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Author Topic: Newman Motor - tinkering and teething problems  (Read 11013 times)

Offline Spirality

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Newman Motor - tinkering and teething problems
« on: August 02, 2012, 09:53:16 AM »
I'm experimenting with my own home-made Newman Motor at the moment, and just started reading other OU posts about it. (I attached a few images, I hope they appear when I publish the post)
My first version had a lot of windings, and the magnets were too close to the axle, expecting a lot of torque. (Newman2.jpg)
My second version has the magnets on a longer "core" but I suspect has too many windings for 9V (350+350 of 26swg, approx 2.5 inch diameter). I'm not getting any movement at all from that configuration. (Newman3.jpg)

I had wired up a Daftman circuit but again, there are probably too many windings.
I am using a reed switch but I suspect a big spark will just burn it out, so I am open to a rethink.
Going back to simplicity for the circuit until I can sort out the voltage-windings-torque-etc.

I am going to try larger (16mm) magnets and fewer windings (maybe around 100-200), or a combination.
Am also on the lookout for a Brass or Aluminium axle, so as not to divert the flow of magnetism. Certain plastics might do aswel, instead of the steel threaded bolt I am currently using, which is handy for assembly.
Do you think it makes a difference to have the coils wound in a circle instead of in a square?

I'd appreciate any comments, ideas, etc.
Thanks :)

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline Spirality

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Re: Newman Motor - tinkering and teething problems
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2012, 12:15:22 PM »
Using the simple reed/commutator switch, I just linked together 4 small 9V batteries in series and put the 36 Volts into the machine, it turns okay which means the basic arrangement is okay too.
When I spin it, it turns and goes for a bit, but slowly grinds to a halt. There is a lot of friction in my bearings, so I put some wd40 on them and it actually made the Motor go slower. Physics is mocking me :(

I will take a few readings, etc. before I change anything like magnets or that.
Even with just 36 Volts, the reed switch is lit up with a small spark. I know its a high voltage motor, but I'd still like to build something that runs off of 9v. I don't mind using a transformer with the 9v to get the high voltage either. I'd love to get some ideas about how to turn this 9v into around 100v or so.

Offline neptune

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Re: Newman Motor - tinkering and teething problems
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2012, 04:18:51 PM »
I do not think square coils and round coils make much difference. When winding experimental coils, always add coil taps as you wind, so that you can change the number of turns.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Newman Motor - tinkering and teething problems
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2012, 04:18:51 PM »
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Offline Spirality

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Re: Newman Motor - tinkering and teething problems
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2012, 06:16:50 PM »
I know I said I would take some readings before modifying this motor, but I was at an Energy workshop recently and decided to go with the flow.
I made a few changes, 26swg wire, 150+150 turns. The device doesn't operate as well, so the next version will have many more turns of a thinner wire, and better magnets.
I also burned out my Reed switch so I made a new one at the workshop. I used a partially flattened Nail, tied loosely with stripped wire, and flat copper strip (plant-tag) wrapped around a matchstick.

Photos:
Newman4 = the latest arrangement, soon to be changed again.
Core = Magnetic Core made from 4 Neodymium Magnets, 3 Nuts and a cable-tie. You can also see a brass push-end to stop the coil wire from getting damaged by the axle.
Reed-Open-Closed = The new Reed switch in Open and Closed positions.

I do not think square coils and round coils make much difference. When winding experimental coils, always add coil taps as you wind, so that you can change the number of turns.
Thanks for the input Neptune, I will be using the square coils in the next version as its slightly more economical and the angle of wire-to-magnetic-stream is better.
I presume by "tapping" you mean to solder some short wires at various lengths along the coil wire? Great idea, I suppose every 50 or 100 turns should do it, or each time the winding layers reach one end of the coil.

Offline neptune

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Re: Newman Motor - tinkering and teething problems
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2012, 09:12:30 PM »
Yes you got the basic idea on coil taps. Here is how I do it. After winding , say, 25 turns , double the wire back on itself for about 2 inches, and then twist the two resultant strands together. Then carry on winding. The result is a "spur" or branch sticking out from the coil. You only need to strip the insulation from the end of the tap if, and when you decide to user it.
     A useful idea is to add taps after 5 turns, 10, 15,20, and 25 turns. After that, tap every 25 turns. By using various taps you can vary the total turns over a wide range, and use the early, fine taps for fine tuning.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Newman Motor - tinkering and teething problems
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2012, 09:12:30 PM »
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Offline Spirality

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Re: Newman Motor - tinkering and teething problems
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2012, 06:54:21 AM »
Yes you got the basic idea on coil taps. Here is how I do it. After winding , say, 25 turns , double the wire back on itself for about 2 inches, and then twist the two resultant strands together. Then carry on winding. The result is a "spur" or branch sticking out from the coil. You only need to strip the insulation from the end of the tap if, and when you decide to user it.
     A useful idea is to add taps after 5 turns, 10, 15,20, and 25 turns. After that, tap every 25 turns. By using various taps you can vary the total turns over a wide range, and use the early, fine taps for fine tuning.

Thanks for the advice, I'll probably do longer taps and label them, it will be easier later.
I'll be using fine wire so at the end of every layer of turns I'll fold the projecting taps down flat, and bring them all out sideways like a ribbon cable, so I can keep winding over them.

The plan is to add taps as you suggest up to around 300-500, then in steps of 100, and it would be better if the tap legs were tucked out of the way. I have a pound (2x250g) of .236mm wire (34swg) for both coils, and a home-made winding jig. I'll be ready to do a few thousand turns.

Do you reckon its a good idea to vary the tap frequency from 25 to 50 and 100, or do it all at 25?
I am also considering a small bit of glue to hold the tab leg together at the bottom, in the windings, to complete the 360o of a turn. My concern is that the wire will be too thin for a normal twist to hold it together. I may also see about winding it with a physical overlap instead, or a bit of thin tape, to tighten-down the tab base.

I would also like to build an outer rotating armature, and place extra Magnets on it facing the inner core magnets. I can easily visualize a stream of magnetic flux between them and the magnetic core, passing through the wire at 90o as it rotates. This will facilitate the electro-gyroscopic motion of the copper atoms over the widest area at the best angle, especially with bar magnets of a certain polarity. It may be useful (or not) to add taps at both ends of the Coil, with that inner-outer magnet arrangement....

An Electrical Professor friend and I were turning the latest motor conventionally with the Reed Switch Setup, on 51 volts from Golf Car Batteries. For a few seconds it accelerated giving big sparks on the Reed, before the nail began sticking to the copper contact. Both have a layer of soot now. She suggested a normal Relay as the switch, or a light spring against the nail.
I would eventually prefer to power it by JT.  Am curious to hear what other People's in/out Voltages are.

Cheers
Spir

 

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