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Author Topic: Dia. Mag. Alternator  (Read 172620 times)

Offline z.monkey

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Dia. Mag. Alternator
« on: May 27, 2010, 01:34:19 PM »
This is the conceptual proof of concept for the Diametrically Magnetized Alternator (DMA). This design is based on Diametrically Magnetized NIB Magnets (N42s). The Lego mock up is to explore the "Auto-Motoring" effect and also to explore the feasibility of using the "Auto-Motoring" effect to make an Alternator...

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2010, 01:37:17 PM »
At first estimate I thought this prototype might cost as much as $200 to build.  But I managed to scale down the unit and purchased the building materials for like $30.  It took a good 4 hours to cut the sheet metal and tubes.  Then also I had to shave about 5 mils off the "Music Wire" shafts.  Got a new way to do that with a file and a drill...

So anyway here is a shot of the assembly process...

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2010, 01:37:58 PM »
Here I have fabricated a prototype out of 1/16" aluminum sheeting, some aluminum tubes and steel rods for the axles. The NIB Magnets are K&J Part number RA2ADIA, which are diametrically magnetized. The NIB Magnets are epoxied to the steel shafts. Here is the datasheet on the magnets...
http://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=RA2ADIA

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2010, 01:38:23 PM »
The next step is to wind a coil that will go in "The Pinch". Diametrically magnetized magnets have an interesting characteristic when they are mounted parallel to each other. They do something called "auto-motoring". If you turn one magnet the other one will stay precisely aligned with the one that is being turned. So, we are going to exploit this concept and make an alternator using this "auto-motoring" concept. "The Pinch" is the area between the magnets. This is where intense rotating magnetic fields are. If we put a coil "In The Pinch" then we should be able to draw current off the rotating magnetic fields...

Offline e2matrix

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2010, 07:01:31 PM »
Cool idea.  I recently learned about Lenz's law firsthand after dropping a neo-magnet down a copper tube and also an aluminum tube to see it fall very slowly in both of these.  I'm wondering if the aluminum side plates will act to resist or slow rotation of the magnets?   

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2010, 07:52:18 PM »
Well, when I hook up the input shaft to my drill it doesn't seem to go very slow...

I guess I would have to build another structure out of plastic as a control set...

Its all in design right now, so it could go many different directions...

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2010, 06:12:02 PM »
So I have a finite space to put a coil.  I don't want the coil to touch either magnet.  Also I don't want the coil to have any ferrous material in it, so that it is not attracted to the magnets.  This melted relay offered to give its cover to make a bobbin for the Pinch Coil...

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2010, 06:13:48 PM »
I am using a #4 x 3/8" spacer for the center of the bobbin.  Then I cut a couple 3/4" squares from the relay cover plastic, and epoxied them together for the bobbin...

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2010, 06:15:37 PM »
Then I use some other hardware to make a winding jig to help stabilize the plastic bobbin while I am winding it.  I started here with red #26 magnet wire, but didn't have enough.  So I unwound the coil and started again with the green wire...

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2010, 06:17:21 PM »
This is the Pinch Coil after winding.  When taking the winding jig apart I broke one of the plastic side off, so I had to epoxy it again.  fortunately the coil didn't unwind, got lucky there...
 

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2010, 06:17:59 PM »
Here is the finished pinch coil...

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2010, 01:29:46 PM »
So the green coil I wound on Friday is Too Fat!  Doh!

I made hasty measurements in the morning before work, and then built the coil in the few bits of spare time I could muster.  I was rushing, and forked up the coil.  I hate it when I do that...

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2010, 01:34:31 PM »
It is almost 1/8" too big.  So, well, guess were gonna do it again.  I still have some plastic from the relay cover.  So I'll build some new sides.  A found some aluminum tubing that I cut to 1/4" inch to be the core of the new bobbin.  Also I didn't glue the sides and the core together this time.  Instead I applied epoxy generously inside the coil a I was winding it.  This way the coil, the core and the sides are glued from the inside.  This makes it a composite coil...

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2010, 01:36:54 PM »
I am also using 1/4-20 hardware this time, so the inside diameter of the coil is larger.  The outside diameter stays the same, 3/4" because we still have that finite space we have to conform to...

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Dia. Mag. Alternator
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2010, 01:39:28 PM »
Now the coil fits in the pinch with around 1/32" (0.031") clearance on each side.  Good, finally fits, now we have to modify the mounting plates to secure the coil...