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Author Topic: Dry Cell voltage leakage  (Read 5074 times)

Offline Artic_Knight

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Dry Cell voltage leakage
« on: February 25, 2010, 01:51:44 AM »
after reading some work from wood pecker (i think was the user) it dawned on me, reguardless of dry cell or wet cell, people are having exposed edges under water for current leakage. the user who origionally tried to remove the bottom submerged hole to save on current leakage still had to fill the unit from the top hole. this would still allow currents to short out between cells.

so perhaps we should discuss methods of covering the edges of holes cut in the metal plates of a dry cell? i have thought of perhaps a liguid electricians tape or peraps some kind of rubber gasket?

please share your ideas.

thanks

Offline Artic_Knight

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Re: Dry Cell voltage leakage
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2010, 02:16:10 AM »
well there are so many opinions to consider! ok sarcasm aside, i see a smacks booser which would have eliminated the "leakage" by using a "fuel injector" type system for the cells. now if i understand electrolysis correctly its the current flowing through the water that generates the hydrogen, so if you eliminate that then all you sucessfully do is evenly distribute the current accross the full surface area of the cells. it appears someone demonstrated on youtube that this is actually less efficient unless you are using neutrals where it can bypass the neutrals. i dont see the need in a neutral plate please correct me if you know how or why it works but again youtube videos have show it doesnt work so the leakage current doesnt really seem to be an issue unless you are skipping neutrals.

any opinions?

Offline Artic_Knight

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Re: Dry Cell voltage leakage
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2010, 03:48:03 PM »
i have read multiple statements and youtube videos theres a hand full saying neutrals are useless and then the others saying they are "voltage dividers" or simply series cells so that the voltage accross any cell is 2v ish  that makes sense. not sure why some say that it doesnt do any good. i looked at what someone calls the tero cell, its available on another website, it speaks of putting gas and water refil ports in the corner and alternating plates so that if there is leakage current it doesnt have a strait path.  that seems to be a real easy and efficient manner of doing it.

Offline HeairBear

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Re: Dry Cell voltage leakage
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2010, 01:10:56 AM »
In any series cell configuration you end up having the disadvantage of inline resistance. Each plate in succession will have a voltage drop resulting in an uneven voltage distribution. For example, the first plate will have a full 12V across it, though it's voltage drop will only allow 10V to the second plate and 8V to the third and so on.