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Author Topic: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power  (Read 230506 times)

Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #555 on: August 10, 2019, 05:52:13 PM »
This half a Hallbach array is hard to squeeze into the sides of the EM coil. A strong rubber band is necessary.

Consider the unique effect as far as the monopole "H" bridge oscillator is concerned; The North pole of the EM is amplified in both directions by a current reversal in the electro magnet!

Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #556 on: August 11, 2019, 06:04:33 PM »
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Pressing permanent magnets against the sides of any electro-magnet coil N pole repulsive, should produce the 1/2 Hallbach effect.

Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #557 on: August 12, 2019, 06:44:12 PM »
Pressing magnets in opposition against the sides of an electro-magnet should work much better then the relay coil. A 100 Newton cylindrical metal Case EM with ceramic magnets powerful enough to repel beyond the attraction to the ferrite.

Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #558 on: August 13, 2019, 10:45:50 PM »
Here's Void109's EM Halbach  transformer:

Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #559 on: August 14, 2019, 04:09:24 AM »
Two Horseshoe coils end to end would maximize the field through the center:

Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #560 on: August 14, 2019, 04:42:10 PM »
A microwave transformer with the two outer laminations wound and three strong neo magnets pressed into the side to complete the Halbach would send flux through the "E" core transformer windings on top and bottem like Void conceived:

Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #561 on: August 15, 2019, 05:24:59 PM »
Testing has confirmed the effectiveness of the cantilevered EM coils. Positioning the Electro-magnet coils to the outside allows the permanent magnets a normal surface to attach to while generating very high inductance for maximum magnetic field strength. Remember the strength parameters of inductance. View from overhead:

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The cantilevered EM coils permit the halbach cube to attach squarly to the central keeper with no wire wraps in the way. The Inductance multiplies and the field strength increases proportionally. The EM hybrid would slip sideways into the array and a second transformer stator would attach to the magnets from the other end like above on the left.

Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #562 on: August 24, 2019, 02:19:04 AM »
This geometry quadruples the force or quarters the input:

Offline synchro1

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Halbach MEG
« Reply #563 on: August 25, 2019, 04:34:11 PM »
The encircled area pictures One output coil on the upper "E" stator. There would be six output coils of this type and eight of the two EM "H" core cubes, one not pictured. Fourteen coils and three powerful permanent magnet cubes:

Reversing the current on the "H" core would keep the core de-saturated.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2019, 09:39:38 PM by synchro1 »

Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #564 on: August 30, 2019, 09:56:03 AM »
 "H" core

Here is a picture of 1/2 a welding rod core. The rods would need to be ground flat in the middle for a nickel cube insertion:


Offline synchro1

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Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #568 on: September 03, 2019, 04:20:01 PM »
The magnet propels away from the Gadolinium as the cube losses its attraction and passes the opposition field beyond the Currie point of 68 degrees farenhiet:. Perhaps a Halbach trigger?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCrt5FwzPC4

Offline synchro1

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Re: Mostly Permanent Magnet Motor with minimal Input Power
« Reply #569 on: September 04, 2019, 04:20:05 PM »
Positioning the four 70lb force cube magnets in Halbach arrangement around the Gadolinium cube will require a rigid form. The repulsion force against the fourth magnet is very strong. Once pressured into position, these forces should flip to one side when the temperature of the Gadolinium rises above the currie point. The Gadolinium first focuses the the magnetic forces toward itself, then the forces encounter each other when the Gadolinium grows inert. The fields from the two side facing magnets should show up on one side of the arrangement above the Currie point. The Currie point would be a few degrees higher due to the MCE effect of the magnets.


Maintaining the temperature of the array at just above the Currie point and subjecting the array to additional magnetic flux from an oscillator, would cool it as a magnetic refrigerator works, but flipping the halbach fields.