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Author Topic: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine  (Read 26041 times)

Offline Pirate88179

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Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« on: November 03, 2009, 07:27:42 AM »
Electricme (Jim) has come up with a new and novel twist to engine design.  I started this topic for him.

Bill

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« on: November 03, 2009, 07:27:42 AM »

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2009, 07:30:45 AM »
@ All:

His original designs as posted can be viewed here:


http://www.overunity.com/index.php?topic=7769.700

Bill

Offline electricme

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2009, 08:58:57 AM »
At Bill,

Thank you again my good friend, for doing this for me I appreciate this very much indeed.

*****      *****     *****     *****


TOO EVERYONE WHO READS THE INFORMATION ON THIS FORUM


THIS ENGINE WHICH I HAVE DESIGNED,      TODAY I HAVE FREELY GIVEN TO THE WORLD

on this day Tuesday the 3rd of November 2009, which just happens to be Melbourne cup day in Australia

I electricme present

            The
  DUDGEON ENGINE


In honor of my deceased father Mr BOB Dudgeon, who's occupation was a humble motor mechanic.

This engine wipes away forever the notion that the humble 4 stroke engine is locked up with a long crankshaft, that it must be forever be run in a 2 revolution cycle.

I HAVE THROWN AWAY THE CRANKSHAFT AS WE ALL HAVE KNOWN IT    ;D

I HAVE ALSO THROWN AWAY THE CAMSHAFT   ;D
 
I will make even more outstanding claims that Will border on the absolute impossible, but it will be verified by mechanical engineers who examine my engine with an open mind.

WHAT ELSE WILL IT BE ABLE TO DO
The actual 4 stroke cycle is built into a revolving flywheel as a deeply machined groove, this groove allows the engine designer to add in to the working of this engine the usual 4 stroke principle on a 2 revolution of the crankshaft but combines it to a SINGLE revolution of the flywheel. ;D

To my knowledge, this has never been achieved anywhere. :)

I also claim that the same principle can be used to have 2 complete spark plug fireing of a single spark plug, by designing the deep groove to accommodate this, just double up the high and lows of the deep groove. ;)

That's just for starters.     

This engine will run on petrol, diesel, paint thinners, eather, HHO even cooking oil, as long as you raise the compression enough or alter the timing allowing it to do so.


I also have NEVER made this engine, nor made any model of it, I simply have no desire to do so as strange as that may seem.

Below I present the only drawing of it, the engineers of the world can take it from this point onwards, make it work, redesign it to their hearts desire if they so wish.

In the next few pages I will explain how it works, step by step, I encourage everyone to copy and print out what they feel free to use to make one of their own. There are NO measurements, you just go from scratch, that way YOU will be the one who has the success with it. As you look closely at it, you will begin to see the enormous way it can be configured to be made to work for you.


Here is the diagram as a JPG file. Please enjoy

jim electricme

   

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2009, 08:58:57 AM »
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Offline MW383

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2009, 06:37:16 PM »

Jim,

I will be reading and interpretting this design over the next several days. What I would like to do is get this modelled up within Solidworks. I would be able to build a full assembly and apply motion to its various moving components. Solidworks a good tool here not only from a modelling standpoint but also in its ability to quickly generate official machining style blueprints. Through auxillary program add-ons, some amount of simulation could also be done (stresses-forces, thermodynamics).

Let me know if you are interested in this. In the mean time, I will attempt to wrap my mind around what you are proposing here.

Best regards,

MW383

Offline electricme

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2009, 09:48:34 PM »
mw383

Thank you for your input and the Solidworks option sounds excellent to me.

I appreciate this, and it will be a good test to run.

I would like to speak to you on this topic soonest if this may be possible.

I will PM you with the NS papers within the next couple of hours.

In the mean time, below is a further explanation on how I perceive the operation of the engine occurs relating to the usual 4 cycle engine as most people know it today.

Over the last couple of days I have had questions relating to people who need a clarification on just how the 4 "normal" strokes relate to this new engine of mine, so I will endeavor to explain this principle in a more graphical way.

I will post jpgs with just their number to identify which belongs to what photo eg 1696.jpg is (1696 = and the story follows)
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
1696 = I depicts the 4 stroke of the "normal" engine as we all understand it today as a graphical BLUE WAVY LINE.

The line begins,
As you can see, the 1st upward line at the left depicts the piston rising, compressing fuel mixture, it rises to TDC.

At this point the "red" X denotes the spark plug fires, and the POWER stroke begins.
The blue line begins to fall, this indicates the piston is being forced down.
The blue line begins to flatten out, the EXHAUST valve is opening, the blue line begins to rise upwards on its exhaust stroke.
Towards the top the exhaust valve closes and the INLET valve opens, this is the INTAKE stroke.
The blue line continues it's downward travel, it begins to flatten out, the Intake stroke ends, the intake valve closes and the COMPRESSION stroke begins and rises to the top and the whole procedure starts all over again.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

OK now we have to "S T R E T C H" THIS IMAGINARY STROKE PROCESS by pulling the blue line longer.
This will give you a better understanding on how my engine converts this 4 stroke principle 2 revolution (which does not alter) into a single revolution but still using the 4 stroke principle to work.

Let us now look at graph 1697.

1697 = The same image that you saw above is now a shallow wriggly line, I have done this on purpose to explain this easier.
At the left is the upward rising COMPRESSION, which rises to the SPARK PLUG and FIRING point.
All the stroke principles are still there as you can see, BUT from this point onwards, we now take the end of this wriggly line and begin to form a circle with it, so the END of the line representing the downward power stroke now is taken around and underneath, then back upwards towards the beginning of the 1st line at the left side, you will have formed a very crude circle.

Now lets take a look at the this final image which looks like a deformed peanut.
The RED X denotes the FIRING POINT, the blue line we bent represents the channel or SLOT which is machined into the flywheel.
The Black small X in a circle represents the fulcrum or axle centre.

So as the PISTON is FIXED to the piston SHAFT (which is no longer a conrod) can only move in two directions (UP or DOWN), as the slot revolves, it pulls the piston either Up or Down, depending on where the wobble piece (affixed at the bottom of the piston shaft) is in relation to the moving slot machined inside the flat face of the flywheel.
 
If you take a straight wire coat hanger and form all the above curves as seen in image 1696, then stretch it as seen in 1697, then form a circle, you will end up with the peanut image as seen.

This shows you how TWO complete rotations of the crankshaft is transformed into a SINGLE rotation, but the 4 stroke principle is still retained.
 
jim

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2009, 09:48:34 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline MW383

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2009, 10:01:59 PM »
Jim,

I really like your diagrams and analogy. My mind is now wrapping around this much faster now. The next step for me is to understand your mechanical components and movements thereof. This is quite interesting. I will say right now that this design should prove to be more thermally efficient than conventional 4-strokes. We will prove this out in the future and even apply some design tweaks to make even more efficient.

This is a very interesting thing you have here Jim,

MW383

Offline mondrasek

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2009, 10:28:35 PM »
This is unfortunately not a new design.  It is well known and is sometimes referred to as a "Crankless"  or "Cam Drive" engine.  Here is one example:  http://www.rexresearch.com/revetec/revetec.htm 

I remember seeing one on the cover of "Popular Mechanics" several years back that had upwards of 18 or so pistons arrayed around the cam/main shaft.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2009, 10:28:35 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline electricme

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2009, 10:30:28 PM »
BURN TIMEs and explanations

I have refined this a little further to make it easier if some people still might not understand the operating principle.

In image 1698 = I have added in RED the main points or KEYS representing the 4 strokes
                        Just follow them around the blue line image from 1/ to 5/

OK at this point, we can play around with the firing of the mixture between points 1 and 2.

As you can see, there is a slight downward drop between point 1 and 2, this represents the "time" you want the mixture to BURN during the cycle in relation to the amount of degrees of angle available to carry out the burn process.

A machinist can machine the slot to give a tiny burn time or a longer burn time.
The longer the "burn" time the more fuel is consumed, the higher the pressure builds, the more torque is available.

This section alone could in no doubt be machined to reflect what ever senerio  was required.
In a recropicating engine, this is a fixed quantity as the crankshaft is directly affixed to the big ends, but here, because the "big end" is done away with, the machined slot takes its place, and by the changing of the flywheel accommodates this.

So looking at the diagram again, we see the whole process begins at
 
position 1/ then when the flywheel rotates to X the spark plug fires the compressed mixture, the mixture is burnt between X and 2/.
2/ represents the point where the pressure of the burnt gasses is really applied in a downward force, which is controlled by the machined slot in the flywheel.
Positions of 1/ to 3/ combines position 2/, it may look a little confusing, but I did it this way to explain the burn time procedures.

The positions between 1/ and 3/ represents the  POWER           stroke.
The positions between 3/ and 4/ represents the  EXHAUST        stroke.
The positions between 4/ and 5/ represents the  INTAKE           stroke.
The positions between 5/ and 1/ represents the  COMPRESSION stroke.

-------------------------------------------------------

Now print out the next jpg which is 1699

Next using scissors, cut out the peanut image, and past to thick cardboard.
Draw a piston on some scrap paper with a vertical fixed shaft, then cut it out and fix to cardboard too.

Grab a drawing pin and shuv it through the round hole with the black X in it
Now grab your cutout piston place it vertical on the peanut, the bottom of the piston shaft always points to the blue line.

ROTATE the peanut slowly, matching the blue line with the bottom of the piston shaft, remember, the piston shaft must NOT move sideways, it MUST be FIXED in a UP or DOWN ward motion.

Keep rotating the peanut, and you will begin to see how the 4 stroke principle actually does follow the blue line you have on the peanut.

That's it folks, my DUDGEON ENGINE and the way it works.

jim

Offline MW383

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2009, 11:05:24 PM »
I just looked at these links and materials and they indeed appear to be cam driven and employ a Scotch Yoke type mechanism between 2 opposing pistons. There was actually a chap building something similar right after WW2. Bourke perhaps? I forget as it has been a long time since I read about them.

Regarding Jim's design, I think some principals may be similar but from my initial assessment, he is applying other design aspects which appear unique. I will now read his latest post to confirm.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2009, 11:05:24 PM »
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Offline electricme

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2009, 11:28:23 PM »
VARIABLE PISTON SPEED during each cycle/revolution. :D
ADDING a extra STEP in the Exhaust procedure, creating a 6 cycle procedure in a single revolution. :D
ENGINEERING SOFTWARE

Over the last centuries, the piston cannot alter its designed up or downward movement. :(
 

This engine of mine also has another unique feature, which is impossible in the usual 4 stroke engine.
Engine designers will love this.

As the machined slot is machined in the flywheel, the position of the slot in any position can reflect what the engine designer wants to do with it.

For instance I have already showed you the burn time can be made flexable by lengthening the position of the burn between points X and point 2/.
This WAS a dream that engine designers could not do on a normal engine. 8)

In the same way the compression can be altered to reflect a slow rise in compression, OR, it can start as a low compression rising to a rapid compression. :o
Let us take a closer look at the position of the slot between position 5/ and 1/.

As the flywheel revolves further around the axis, the machined grove forces the piston to follow a pre planed movement, if the machined slot had a deeper wave to it, the piston would have to follow this pattern, reflecting it in its operation.

The piston in this engine does not rise simply up or down at a fixed pattern as is expected in the usual 4 stroke principle which is governed by the rotating crankshaft.

This piston will have many different variable speeds applied to it, which depends exactly where the position of the machined Slot relates to the bottom of the piston shaft where the swivel plate is in relation to the flywheel.

So the designer engineer has a lot more scope/flexture which he can incorporate into the final design of this engine.

The engine is extremely flexable in design and those designs can be incorporated into this engine by placing them in the machined flywheel grove.

For instance, if a designer wanted to allow only a low compression engine, all he has to do is to use a shallower wave for the piston to follow in the machined slot.
If he wanted a higher compression, the wave is just made a bit more aggressive.

If for instance the engine designer wanted the engine to expunge the exhaust gasses TWICE instead of the usual only allowable ONCE, because of the 4 stroke principle, he would only have to create a small EXTRA wave during the machining of the flywheel slot to incorporate this.
Between position 4/ and 5/ is the EXHAUST stroke, by placing a ridge in the machined slot this could be achieved, the lower or higher the ridge the more or less aggressive the piston stroke becomes. 8)

So in actual fact the piston would travel in its upward exhaust stroke, then be made to return to the bottom of the stroke with the exhaust valve still open and the return stroke would almost guarantee a 100 percent of all previous burnt gasses evacuated. Something that is IMPOSSIBLE to do on a current 4 stroke engine.

I suppose in effect this could be termed a 6 stroke engine, BUT it occurs only during the SINGLE revolution or complete turn of the flywheel.
As I said earlier, this is AMAZING stuff, and the mechanical engineer, will have his head spinning at the possibilities he will be able to incorporate in the design phase.

In effect the piston would not have to actually go all the way to the bottom again if not required, but it could be made to rest a split second if needed then it could be sent on it's way again to complete the current cycle. To do this, a small step would be machined in the flywheel plate to accommodate this.

As I mentioned previously, this engine is not a standard engine that we are all used to, it has amazing features available to the engine designer that he has never dreamt about, it is truly the most flexable engine, which is capable of truly amazing features, no doubt over time, designers will come up with other operating features that will be utterly impossible to the usual 4 stroke cycle engines that are used today.

ENGINEERING SOFTWARE.
Well, I guess you all know by now I don't use any, lol, the old pen and paper is my tool, but I know the design of metal parts for fabrication requires software, probably the old CAD stuff, but no doubt these companies who make these might have to take a look see at this engine idea of mine and reflect the changes in their programs.

jim

 

Offline MW383

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2009, 11:49:41 PM »
Jim,

I remain intrigued by the flexibility here. Very cool.

I look at this and see that it should transfer mechanical power efficiently and that it would do so in a less mechanically stressed manner. I would think this to be useful in any mode of operation.

I like the ability to tune in combustion timing aspects. I would assume this to be a multi-fuel capable engine, just modify the curve accordingly.

Keep drawing the pictures Jim.

, MW383


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2009, 11:49:41 PM »
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Offline electricme

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2009, 01:02:50 AM »
The PISTON ASSEMBLY see image 1700
The SWIVAL BAR         see image  1701
The END GUIDE PLATE  see image 1702 and 1703

-------------------------

The PISTON ASSEMBLY

The piston can be any piston the designer engineer wants to use, whatever material it is made of, dimensions is entirely up to the purpose it is used for, I have no other comment to make about choices.

BUT in this engine of mine, there is a GREAT difference from all other engines.

The current way of affixing a piston to the engine is to use a CONROD.
The CONROD is NO MORE, I have pitched this away as it is now no longer cannot be filtered to my engine, there is NO BIG END.

The old problem of "throwing a rod through the side of the block is OVER"

There is NO little end bearing or Gudgeon Pin or Wrist pin, instead I have replaced this component with a FIXED SQUARE SOLID SHAFT.

Please look at image 1700


One end of the solid shaft is affixed inside the piston rock solid, so it has no lateral or side movement.
The other end has a large Heavy Duty solid shaft attached through a hole in the square solid shaft.

Over this Heavy Duty shaft is placed the Thick SWIVEL PLATE, which is designed to rock on the Heavy Duty shaft during operation.

Please see image 1701


This whole piston, Square steel sliding shaft, Shaft Bearing and Swivel plate is as one unit assembly, is held in place inside the engine by a CHANNELED GUIDE which is machined into the END GUIDE PLATE.

Please see images 1702 and image 1703


The End Guide Plate is the same diameter as the Flywheel which contains the machined guide.

The machined Channeled Guide allows the main square shaft to slide UP or DOWN inside it.

Its main purpose is to hold the Square Shaft securely, so preventing it from rotating or making any sideways movement.
It also presents the main Guide swivel Plate Pin in its correct working position which is 90 degrees to the face of the rotating Flywheel.

Sufficient clearances will need to be set to prevent any form of seizure or lock up.

As the flywheel which contains the machined guide rotates, the Swivel rocker plate is matched inside the guide, this now makes the piston rise or lowers relating to the position of the machined guide.

If the guide is in the lowest position, the piston assembly will be at its lowest, if the guide is in it's highest position, the piston assembly will reflect that position.

The piston reflects its position that the mechanical designing engineer designs into the machine guide.

The main flywheel and End Guide Plate are assembled in a slightly larger stubby round drum type container, I have coined the term the DRUM HOUSING.

The end plate guide plate is made slightly larger than the rotating flywheel, then bolt hole positions are machined and matched up with the Drum Housing.
Through bolts are passed through the End Guide Plate holes to mate up with corresponding threads in the drum housing.

We cannot call it a crank case any longer, as the crank and cam shafts simply don't exist.

The whole engine is kept in alignment by the drum housing, the axle is presented into the housing bearing assembly along with the machined flywheel, the piston assembly is presented into the End Plate Guide and the End Plate Guide is attached to the Drum Housing, the through bolts are presented to there respective positions and tightened, so the whole DUDGEON ENGINE is ready, except for the CYLINDER which the engine designer has chosen.

Cooling, this depends a lot with the choice of cylinder housing is used, air cooled or fluid cooled is the choices, I have concentrated only on the bottom half.

jim




 

Offline electricme

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #12 on: November 04, 2009, 01:57:15 AM »
Mandrasek,

I have never heard of the Crankless or Cam drive engine you mentioned, never been aware of it, nor have I had opportunity to see the magazine you refer to.

I am an Invalid Pensioner, I do not have the resources to buy the associated reading materials, or to provide for a fully equipped machine shop, (wow wouldn't that be something). I hope you understand my limitations.

My main hobby is not as an engineer inventor of engines but I enjoy the Joul Thief and Stubblefield forums stuff.

In fact this engine just came to me out of the blue, several years ago before I even had access to the internet.
I just threw a few ideas I had together floating in my mind ages ago, and eventually arrived to what I presented in the last 24 hours on overunity.

No person has spoken to me about the above engine types you mention, and I have not know of this web site, nor been there.
No doubt some person some time will say they have known of my engine, well they didn't get it from me :), and I am not in the habit of stepping on anyones toes.

I have spoken to only three people about this engine, one a qualified machinist (about10 years ago) who said to me he had never ever heard of anything like it, the other was a local farmer (about 5years ago), he also has never heard of it and didn't understand it, and a fellow who has a win solar generator setup out my way, (last year) who couldn't understand it either.

I suppose it could be seen like this, every engine has a rotating shaft, weather it is electric powered, fossil fuel powered or solar powered. But irrespective of the energy it takes to turn the shaft, it still revolves, the only difference is the method to create the motion.

But thank you for letting me know.

jim

Offline tishatang

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2009, 09:23:17 AM »
Jim
I understand everything except maybe the swivel bar.  But that's not important right now.  I see all the advantages you state.  There will be a trade off by how long you can slow the piston for complete burn.  To slow it will require a more shallow ramp.  The shallow ramp will increase side loading on the square shaft when the piston fires, resulting is less torque to rotation.  The overall length of the rod/piston will determine its weight.  It looks heavy?  Overall, I think the engine will be a low-rev hi torque design, which is good in my opinion.  Longer life span and less noise.  To be in balance, it needs to be min of two cylinders in a flat twin opposed engine.  Two pistons working in unison opposing each other.
Looking good.
Chris

Offline tishatang

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Re: Introducing The Dudgeon Engine
« Reply #14 on: November 04, 2009, 09:52:50 AM »
Jim
The engine that mondrasek referenced is nothing like your design.  It is a double piston design as well the Hermann Cam engine I PM'd you about.  That was probably the engine he saw on the cover of the mag as that engine had passed FAA approval as an aircraft engine.  Double ended piston engines are a balancing nightmare.  The 12 cyl Hermann engine shook the concrete floor like mad as it ran on the test bed.  I saw it in operation.  This was near Lockheed aircraft in Burbank, Calif.  These engines can also be machining nightmares also.  Although now with computer controlled machines may no longer be a problem.  You engine is the most simple to make I have seen.  The most difficult part is machining the grove profile.  But nowadays that can be dialed in with the computer control.  Should be rugged and easy to repair. 

Why the swivel bar?  Why not a roller bearing in the grove?  The roller will move around and wear evenly.  Allow for clearance so that it does not drag on both side of the grove at the same time.  Am I still missing something here?
Chris

 

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