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Author Topic: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie  (Read 552244 times)

Offline TinselKoala

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Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« on: June 17, 2009, 03:52:52 AM »
Ramset found this link to Rosemary Ainslie's work, and I found it interesting enough to fool around with. So I built a circuit, identical only with some different components, and started testing it. I haven't done nearly enough to give a final evaluation, but one thing I do see already: the input power signal is very spiky and so will be more or less underestimated by Ainslie's described technique.
That is, if my circuit behaves anything like hers.

http://www.feelthevibe.com/free_energy/rosemary_ainslie/transient_energy.pdf




Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2009, 03:58:53 AM »
So here's a picture of my "replication" of Ainslie's circuit. I couldn't find the IRFGP50 MOSFET locally, so I used a similar one, 2SK1548. And instead of using a 555 timer clock circuit I just used my trusty Interstate F34 function generator to make the gate drive pulses. And instead of using a .25 ohm current-viewing shunt I used a 2.5 ohm shunt. But the rest is as specified.

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2009, 04:06:55 AM »
Here's the instrument stack. From the top, Fluke frequency counter (if it works, it's a "Fluke"!) showing 2.4 kilohertz. Next the F34, set on "pulse" mode with a DC offset to bring the baseline to zero volts and the peaks to about 10 volts, and the duty cycle cranked way down.
Next is the Tek scope, showing the pulse output from the F34. There are 5 minor divisions per horizontal cm, so one minor div would be 5 percent duty cycle if the entire wave takes 4 cm. You can see that this cycle is a bit over 4 cm, and the peaks are about half a minor division, so that's less than 5 percent and more than 2.5 percent. (Ainslie specifies 3.7 percent. How she got that precise with her equipment I'll never know.)
Next is the Philips scope with the current (input) waveform on top and the load (output) waveform on bottom. This is with the gate drive potentiometer turned down relatively low, so there isn't much distortion--that is, the device isn't yet operating in the Ainslie "OU" regime.

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2009, 04:17:11 AM »
Now it starts to get interesting. The MOSFET is being operated way out of its normal operating regime. This circuit is actually a reasonably good amplifier, if you give it a sine input and moderate gate voltage. But with the short pulse input in this circuit the gate voltage has to be turned up higher than spec, so the circuit gets non-linear. I haven't been able to get mine to do the "random oscillations" that Ainslie talks about, but without seeing her scope trace I can't really tell what she's talking about. Things like that often occur from poor circuit layout, but this circuit shouldn't be too sensitive to that since it isn't really high frequency. (The MOSFET seems to do OK up to 2 MHz, which is where my equipment pretty much tops out).
So here's the result of increasing the gate drive to the point of non-linearity. Note the spikes developing in the current (input) trace.

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2009, 04:26:16 AM »
Now, there can be a lot of power hiding in those leading and trailing spikes. My oscilloscopes at home aren't fast enough to reveal just how much power is in there, but you can get an idea from the following pictures. I cranked the gate drive up all the way and here's the result: the output waveform is still OK but there are some huge spikes on the input. There's a lot of power in those spikes. They are the inductive kickback from the inductances formed by the wirewound load resistor and the wiring. They represent energy, input from the battery over a "long" time, kicked back in a "short" time by the collapsing magnetic field.
I think.
The fact that the trailing spike is strongly negative may mean that the battery is self-recharging a bit. But regardless, it represents power that isn't being dissipated in the load resistor.

Now, Ainslie uses a calorimetric procedure to estimate her output, and since she saw her load resistor getting warmer than it should have, _given her input power calculations_, she makes the claim of COP > 17. It will be some time before I am able to repeat her output power measurements...
Since my load resistor has not perceptibly warmed up at all.
Yet...
 :'(

Leading edge spike:

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2009, 04:29:32 AM »
Start and finish of trailing edge spike: (second picture has the area shown in the first picture, cranked a full screen up out of sight, to reveal the bottom of the spike.)

With a faster scope the spike would no doubt be seen to go even further. There's actually a lot of power in that skinny spike.

Offline also antlike

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2009, 04:58:55 AM »
Interesting, I have never heard of Rosemary Ainslie before.

Offline fritznien

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2009, 06:04:39 AM »
nice work TK, i wish my stuff was as neat.
just a couple of things you are using wire wound resisters, lots of inductance at 2.4 kHz. which explains the spikes.
a FET is just a switch so my money is on bad measurements. easy enough to make a filtered supply and measure DC on the input to
see what the real input is.
have fun
fritznien

Offline WilbyInebriated

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2009, 09:33:40 AM »
any plan on doing it right? meaning getting proper components for the ones that you have that are not spec.
do you plan to use a calorimeter if/when you make the circuit to spec?

i am assuming you have a diode on the genny output? could you confirm?

Offline exnihiloest

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2009, 11:43:08 AM »
Hi All,

The paper from Ainslie and Buckley is intriguing because the  output/input power ratio is enormous, near 20!
But the setup is very simple, so electronics engineers should have observed such anomalies long time ago.

1) the main source of errors is RF interferences. A temperature probe placed inside a heating resistance is capacitively coupled to the circuit. As the signal in the resistance has components at high frequencies, HF currents can flow to the "heatmeter" and completely pollutes the measurement. Ham radio operators know what I mean. I don't know the background of Ainslie and Buckley but if they are not familiar with HF, they may have been trapped.

2) we also should not forget that power is needed to control the FET switching. Normally it is weak and negligeable. Nevertheless if the signal amplitude goes beyond the linear limits and the FET spec, a non negligeable part of the switching control power can pass to the output.

Thus take great care when replicating this experiment. In particular, a RF wattmeter should be used.


Offline Liberty

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2009, 01:48:57 PM »
nice work TK, i wish my stuff was as neat.
just a couple of things you are using wire wound resisters, lots of inductance at 2.4 kHz. which explains the spikes.
a FET is just a switch so my money is on bad measurements. easy enough to make a filtered supply and measure DC on the input to
see what the real input is.
have fun
fritznien

Well said, and I agree that it is most likely a measurement error.  If it was actually OU, what would be the source of the extra power?

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2009, 03:13:03 PM »
OK, several points to address.
First, yes, when I can find them I will use identical components to Ainslie's circuit. Her MOSFET is kind of pricey and will have to be ordered; the one I'm using is...well, you can look up the data. It's pretty close, good enough for prelim testing. I will replace the shunt with .25 ohm today.
Second, yes, I know the inductances are causing the spikes. I think that's rather the point.
Third, there is no third thing.
Fourth, yes, in this circuit the pulse generator will be adding power. Ainslie's 555 pulser would most likely be even worse in this regard than my direct FG drive, but without details it's hard to tell for sure.
Fifth, yes, I have access to a proper water-bath calorimetric power meter, but first I want to see if I can get anything using Ainslie's method. So far my load isn't warming at all that I can tell.
More later.

Offline Paul-R

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2009, 03:15:10 PM »
Ramset found this link to Rosemary Ainslie's work, and I found it interesting enough to fool around with.
You may find these useful. The first link connects to her patent
and other papers.

http://www.free-energy.ws/rosemary-ainslie.html

http://rosemaryainslie.blogspot.com/

Paul.

Offline ramset

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2009, 04:20:44 PM »
TK
Quote.>Third, there is no third thing.

3rd is THANKS
You just can't put a price on this[priceless]!!
Chet


Offline qiman

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Re: Claimed OU circuit of Rosemary Ainslie
« Reply #14 on: June 17, 2009, 08:38:12 PM »
If there is anything useful to you all here, feel free to
repost:
http://www.energeticforum.com/renewable-energy/4314-cop-17-heater-rosemary-ainslie.html