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Gravity powered devices => Gravity powered devices => Topic started by: grayone on May 27, 2009, 06:11:49 PM

Title: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: grayone on May 27, 2009, 06:11:49 PM
I have been searching about gravity wheels and it seem only the Mann device is the only sideways gravity design being worked on. Does anybody have other sideways wheels that they know about that I may be able to look at? Or what you think about the sideways approach?

Thank you
Michael
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: petersone on May 28, 2009, 04:30:53 AM
Hi Michael
What's a Mann devise?
peter
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: grayone on May 28, 2009, 04:53:30 AM
Hi Michael
What's a Mann devise?
peter

petersone; The Mann gravity prime mover. This link tells about it.

http://india.bigpatents.org/view/96227/45cd58db7dc

Michael
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: petersone on May 28, 2009, 05:02:20 AM
Hi Michael
Thanks for the link,I read it,all be it quickly,but can't follow it,never was any good at that,always looks more complicated when read,a picture usually helps me.Looks interesting though.I will read it again,and again and-----
peter
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: hansvonlieven on May 28, 2009, 07:13:36 AM
Here is the Peswiki article on the device which gives a lot of detail. 

http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Mann_Gravity_Mover

It does not work of course.

Hans von Lieven
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: Obelix on May 28, 2009, 10:43:54 AM
Hi,
a lot of details, but not how it work.
And the diagram are black on black !
So it's obvious to say don't work .....

Chris
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: petersone on May 28, 2009, 11:02:43 AM
Hi Hans
Thanks for the link, I won't waste time reading it, if you say it won't work that's good enough for me.
peter
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: grayone on May 28, 2009, 02:33:08 PM
I have been searching about gravity wheels and it seem only the Mann device is the only sideways gravity design being worked on. Does anybody have other sideways wheels that they know about that I may be able to look at? Or what you think about the sideways approach?

Thank you
Michael

 This is the reason I am asking. For it looks like to me, that no one is even considering the possibilities. So I will keep looking for other possibilities. For I think there may be some avenues that are not being explored.

Michael
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: hansvonlieven on May 28, 2009, 09:28:00 PM
This is the reason I am asking. For it looks like to me, that no one is even considering the possibilities. So I will keep looking for other possibilities. For I think there may be some avenues that are not being explored.

Michael

Since gravity acts perpendicular to the ground this is the only direction in which this force can be utilised. Gravity does not push or pull sideways. This is something the Indian gentleman is unable to understand by the look of his devices and drawings.

On his so-called buoyancy machine he does not even give any details, he just asks for 30,000 Rupees per Kilowatt output power (That is for the plans, not for the device as I understand it)

I believe the man to be a fraud.

Hans von Lieven
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: grayone on May 28, 2009, 10:08:58 PM
Hans von Lieven; Thank you for your information. I guess I should have made it a bit clearer. I was figuring some form of reaction or a ramp with a reset. In most gravity wheels, you go down 50% and then up 50% of the total distance. On a sideways wheel "ramp" you have 90% down and only have to get up 10% to reset. I was liking the odds. I know it has to lift 100% of the height to reset but it is in a short distance to do it. So I was looking for what others may have done on this approach.

Thanks again
Michael
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: pstroud on May 29, 2009, 12:23:54 AM
Hi Michael!

I have been working with the Mann Gravity Mover for about 10 months now.  I created the PES wiki page but I have not yet posted my test results or other details I have collected on the invention.  I have had parts fabricated for my testing.

The inventor indicates that he is under contract with India to built them for power production.  They have built many test models and his website indicates which had more power for faster speed.  It should not be disregarded so easily.  Most people do not understand the concepts because it is not your normal vertical out of balance wheel design.

This is the inventors website:  http://gurbakhshsinghmannglobalenergy.com/biz/index.htm (http://gurbakhshsinghmannglobalenergy.com/biz/index.htm)

This is the PES wiki page that I have started with "some" of the details that I have collected on this project but not yet showing test results:

http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Mann_Gravity_Mover (http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Mann_Gravity_Mover)

Michael - I suggest you study it with an open mind and make up your own mind.

Preston
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: hansvonlieven on May 29, 2009, 01:09:18 AM
The Mann device reminds me very much of a self moving car I saw seriously proposed some years back. It seems to employ the same principle of operation.

Hans von Lieven
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: Paul-R on May 29, 2009, 03:25:36 PM
Since gravity acts perpendicular to the ground this is the only direction in which this force can be utilised....
What about when the moon is at an angle to an ocean? it pulls at whatever
angle it is, Hans. Get a grip.
Paul-R
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: grayone on May 29, 2009, 08:37:31 PM
I found one atorffyre.com MT124

 http://www.orffyre.com/mt121-143.html

I will start posting any I find on line to give us more to discuss I hope.

Michael
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: grayone on May 29, 2009, 09:08:27 PM
Can Trains be Run by Perpetual Motion (Aug, 1930)
This is a form of sideways.

http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2007/11/06/can-trains-be-run-by-perpetual-motion/

Then there is Finsrud's Perpetuum Mobile

http://video.google.co/videoplay?docid=553061720631716456

I also have notice Finsrud pages here on Over Unity. But I also don't see any use outside of a toy for it.

Michael
Title: Re: Sideways gravity devices?
Post by: hansvonlieven on May 29, 2009, 10:22:23 PM
What about when the moon is at an angle to an ocean? it pulls at whatever
angle it is, Hans. Get a grip.
Paul-R

Incorrect, The line of force between Moon and Earth is from centre to centre. Besides, the moon is too far away for there to be a meaningful deviation from the perpendicular.

Hans von Lieven