Language: 
To browser these website, it's necessary to store cookies on your computer.
The cookies contain no personal information, they are required for program control.
  the storage of cookies while browsing this website, on Login and Register.

GDPR and DSGVO law

Storing Cookies (See : http://ec.europa.eu/ipg/basics/legal/cookies/index_en.htm ) help us to bring you our services at overunity.com . If you use this website and our services you declare yourself okay with using cookies .More Infos here:
https://overunity.com/5553/privacy-policy/
If you do not agree with storing cookies, please LEAVE this website now. From the 25th of May 2018, every existing user has to accept the GDPR agreement at first login. If a user is unwilling to accept the GDPR, he should email us and request to erase his account. Many thanks for your understanding.
Amazon Warehouse Deals ! Now even more Deep Discounts ! Check out these great prices on slightly used or just opened once only items.I always buy my gadgets via these great Warehouse deals ! Highly recommended ! Many thanks for supporting OverUnity.com this way.

User Menu

Tesla Paper

Free Energy Book

Get paid

Donations

Please Donate for the Forum.
Many thanks.
Regards, Stefan.(Admin)

A-Ads

Powerbox

Smartbox

3D Solar

3D Solar Panels

DC2DC converter

Micro JouleThief

FireMatch

FireMatch

CCKnife

CCKnife

CCTool

CCTool

Magpi Magazine

Magpi Magazine Free Rasberry Pi Magazine

Battery Recondition

Battery Recondition

Arduino

Ultracaps

YT Subscribe

Gravity Machines

Tesla-Ebook

Magnet Secrets

Lindemann Video

Navigation

Products

Products

WaterMotor kit

Statistics

  • *Total Members: 83885
  • *Latest: geovat

  • *Total Posts: 523024
  • *Total Topics: 15575
  • *Online Today: 44
  • *Most Online: 103
(December 19, 2006, 11:27:19 PM)
  • *Users: 2
  • *Guests: 9
  • *Total: 11

Author Topic: Where can we find Radium chloride or Radium source ?  (Read 38729 times)

Offline Koen1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1172
Re: Where can we find Radium chloride or Radium source ?
« Reply #30 on: March 31, 2009, 02:02:49 PM »
I'm not sure, may be a web error along the line somewhere,
but I also cannot download those files from google.
Or at least, I couldn't last night, I may try again later.

Why does Rexresearch sell the book?
Well probably because that's the way it's supposed to work:
you write a book, you sell it, others pay to get it.
What Google does is in fact illegal in many countries:
they simply move into a library and scan in all the books there,
even though just about all of those books have a copyright clause
and may not legally be copied and distributed without authorisation
of the authors or publishers.
Many books by foreign authors are simply copied by Google without
even attempting to get authorisation from the authors or their legal
heirs or representatives.
It's great advertising for Google, it is convenient for those who can now
easily get books they used to have to go borrow at the library or buy
at the shop.
It is however not a civil way to proceed, in many cases not actually legal,
and for the authors it is theft of their work and income.

And why would anyone want to build a nuclear reactor?
Well that's quite obvious, isn't it? For the energy.
Basically, we have radioactive materials in the earths soil that is there,
it is radioactive, and it decays. We can leave it there and not get
any usefull energy from it, which means it takes a very long time
before it has decayed enough to no longer be a radiation hazard.
Or we can take it out of the ground, put it in a reactor, and use some
of that radiation that is emitted anyway, to produce some usefull energy.
Afterward, we have the energy we collected, and some material
that is significantly less radioactive than before. We can put that back
in the earth where we found it, and we will now have removed some
of the naturally occurring radioactivity and turned it into a usefull form
of energy.
In a way, nuclear reactors only decrease the amount of radiation and
radioactive material on our planet.

A better question might be why not get our energy from this source?
Is it not better to remove potentially harmfull radiation from the planetary
system than to for example burn fuels that produce additional pollution?

Okay, unfortunately it is currently not yet feasible to construct latest generation
liquid metal reactors, especially not for the experimenter and home inventor,
so complete conversion of radioactive material to energy and non-radioactive
"waste" products is not possible at the moment. But the research is ongoing
and looks very promising, suggesting that within the next 50 years or so this
next generation liquid metal nuclear reactor technology will actually be
implemented on a larger scale, and when that happens the entire stockpile
of nuclear waste suddenly becomes nuclear fuel again...
Untill that time, "classic" style nuclear fission reactors are still quite a good
source of power that produces zero CO2 emissions.

Well, so much for my rant, ;)
replies are most welcome :)

regards,
Koen

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline DreamThinkBuild

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 569
Re: Where can we find Radium chloride or Radium source ?
« Reply #31 on: March 31, 2009, 08:32:56 PM »
Koen,

Thanks for the information on Google and it's book scanning practices.

I'm in agreement with you on using naturally occurring nuclear for electrical generation. What got me interested was the high radon levels we have in my area. Then I found out that they just pump that radon out of the basement and let it disperse into the atmosphere. Seems like there could be a better way to use that radon as it gets pumped out.


Offline Koen1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1172
Re: Where can we find Radium chloride or Radium source ?
« Reply #32 on: April 01, 2009, 11:50:37 AM »
I never really considered Radon for use as energy source,
since its most stable isotope has a halflife of only 3.8 days or so,
and even that only occurs as trace element... All its other isotopes
are both synthetic (not naturally occurring) and have much lower
halflives ranging from approximately 2 to 15 hours.
But I suppose, if there is indeed so much radon collecting in basements
that it needs to be vented into the atmosphere, that such accumulations
could be used... ;)
Now let's just take that most stable isotope, half of that decays within
4 days and emits an alpha particle while decaying into Polonium.
The Polonium isotope formed , Po(218), is one with a halflife of about
3 minutes, and again quite radioactive. This decays again, well, I think
you get the idea... ;) See the Radium decay chain.

So yeah, if there is indeed that much Radon accumulating, we should be able
to use some of it and collect energy from it by interactions with its emission
products.
With beta particles such collection is relatively easy, as those are basically
high speed electrons. With alpha particles this becomes a little more difficult,
as those are helium nuclei. But as such they are positively charged and will
in most cases accept electrons from a donor or electrode.

Have you already worked out a (partial) plan on how to utilise accumulated Radon
to produce output? If so, I'd like to hear about it. ;) :)

Regards,
Koen

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Where can we find Radium chloride or Radium source ?
« Reply #32 on: April 01, 2009, 11:50:37 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline ALFPARTS

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 133
Re: Where can we find Radium chloride or Radium source ?
« Reply #33 on: April 15, 2009, 11:10:00 PM »
Why doesn't anyone use Google for these things:)  - - - Searching for Radium is a risky business. Possession of it without a permit is a felony and 'they' will try to tag you with accusations of terrorist intent.

You can buy it if you go through proper procedures. Just contact an Isotope supplier and find out how to get the use permits.

Old Aircraft radio dials used it circa WWII. A lot of it became available about twenty years ago when they surplused a lot of stuff from Los Alamos. This guy bought a bunch of aircraft radios. He had mexicans disassembling them and they all dies soon aftwards ( 1 to 5 years)

Offline amigo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 545
Re: Where can we find Radium chloride or Radium source ?
« Reply #34 on: April 16, 2009, 02:15:20 AM »
Why, this is your lucky day...

Just recently I stumbled upon a patent application involving use of Radon as an exciter for production of alpha particles, and it comes from no one else but Bruce A. Perreault, titled "Alpha Fusion Electrical Energy Valve"

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2008/0272680.html

So, if a source of Radon can be secured easily, building one of his valves should not be a big deal, if I'm reading the patent application right.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Where can we find Radium chloride or Radium source ?
« Reply #34 on: April 16, 2009, 02:15:20 AM »
Sponsored links:




 

OneLink