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2nd "law" violations => Heat to electric energy conversion => Topic started by: steve_chow on February 08, 2009, 05:27:52 PM

Title: powerverter gas pressure motor- energy problem solved ???
Post by: steve_chow on February 08, 2009, 05:27:52 PM
Hi
Please check...
http://www.powerverdesolar.com/technology.php
does anybody knows how gas power motor works...

regards

Chow
Title: Re: powerverter gas pressure motor- energy problem solved ???
Post by: sushimoto on February 08, 2009, 06:30:16 PM
Hi, thanks for the Link.
this is very interesting, because its combines a heat-pump
with a turbine instead of using heat-exchangers.

Last week, ive talked to an air-condition guy about how to
convert a air condition into a heat pump by swapping the Air-Exchangers
against water types. But as soon i get another hold on him, i will ask
how many pressure on the "hot"-side appears.

very interesting.
best,
sushimoto
Title: Re: powerverter gas pressure motor- energy problem solved ???
Post by: Paul-R on February 08, 2009, 06:38:46 PM
Last week, ive talked to an air-condition guy about how to
convert a air condition into a heat pump
Don't forget the humble refrigerator, particularly the small ones
which work on an electrical heater rather than a motor (quiet).

Recycling centres are full of them. They go for nothing, and
it is easy to undo a few screws from behind, and pull the
works out backwards.

If the refrigerant circuit is broken, then they are useless, of
course. But most people throw their fridge away because
they are bored with its colour.
Paul.
Title: Re: powerverter gas pressure motor- energy problem solved ???
Post by: steve_chow on February 09, 2009, 07:11:57 AM
hi sushimoto

As per PowerVerde systems  they are using  an organic fluid that changes into a gas at a much lower temperature (160F).

Here is my idea , If  we use R134a Refrigerant as a fluid with any steam engine instead of steam it might work because R134a will evaporate in low temp,
but still I need check spec temp vs. PSI for R134a .
please advice....

regards
Chow
Title: Re: powerverter gas pressure motor- energy problem solved ???
Post by: kallstrom_74 on April 05, 2009, 01:21:11 AM
yes i have thinked about the same thing..a liqiud that boils alot easier than water in a closed cirucut in some kind of steam enginge or perhaps a stirling motor...but i will watch this tread with interest
Title: Re: powerverter gas pressure motor- energy problem solved ???
Post by: sushimoto on April 05, 2009, 04:37:43 AM
Don't forget the humble refrigerator, particularly the small ones
which work on an electrical heater rather than a motor (quiet).

Recycling centres are full of them. They go for nothing, and
it is easy to undo a few screws from behind, and pull the
works out backwards.

If the refrigerant circuit is broken, then they are useless, of
course. But most people throw their fridge away because
they are bored with its colour.
Paul.

hi sushimoto

As per PowerVerde systems  they are using  an organic fluid that changes into a gas at a much lower temperature (160F).

Here is my idea , If  we use R134a Refrigerant as a fluid with any steam engine instead of steam it might work because R134a will evaporate in low temp,
but still I need check spec temp vs. PSI for R134a .
please advice....

regards
Chow

Hi Paul, Chow and others to this may concern,

I'm still working on that.
It was a bite hard to get some "old fashioned" steam engine with condensation,
but i have got some now. These things are damn expensive to buy for testing,
because collectors are driving prices.
Instead of piston engines, i would rather test it with turbines,
but they are even harder to get and for now its okay to proof the concept.
Unfortunately, we dont have military or aeronatic junkyards like other countries
where to get a starter-turbine or such from an old Jet-engine .. :/
First tests with fast boiling and condensing "steam" from methyl alcohol and such were very promising because
they are "cooking" at lower temperatures than water.The gases are flammable,
but safety is not he first concern for some experimentators ;D
As you mentioned, fridges are esay to get. It a littly tricky to re-engineer the tubes and
especially the inner "cold" exchangers, but ist manageable in order to get something for testing.
Plus, i have an A/C-Guy, who helps with some special equipment and knowledge.

So if anybody has some more info or experiences to participate on the issue,
i'll be happy with further brainstorming and physical tests as well.

Best,
sushimoto