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Author Topic: Why Doesn't A Magnet 'Feel' Like A Gyroscope?  (Read 23977 times)

Offline e2matrix

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Re: Why Doesn't A Magnet 'Feel' Like A Gyroscope?
« Reply #45 on: March 14, 2017, 07:21:27 PM »
Also the fact that "magnetic force equals centripetal force and is expressed in the equation Bqv=mv^2/r" and that the only explanation for centripetal force would seem to be gravity implies that magnetic force and gravity are of the same 'ilk'.   I state that just as a support for the idea that magnets do not involve electrons - unless you think gravity involves electrons  :)

Offline Eighthman

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Re: Why Doesn't A Magnet 'Feel' Like A Gyroscope?
« Reply #46 on: April 05, 2018, 07:41:17 PM »
It suddenly struck me that the opposite poles of a magnet represent spin in different directions.  Thus, if you put two spinning rotors on one axis - and they are rotating in different directions, the gyroscopic movement or feel is canceled out.


Is the answer really that simple?

Offline Cherryman

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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Why Doesn't A Magnet 'Feel' Like A Gyroscope?
« Reply #48 on: April 06, 2018, 04:30:23 AM »
Also the fact that "magnetic force equals centripetal force and is expressed in the equation Bqv=mv^2/r" and that the only explanation for centripetal force would seem to be gravity implies that magnetic force and gravity are of the same 'ilk'.   I state that just as a support for the idea that magnets do not involve electrons - unless you think gravity involves electrons  :)


That is an incorrect assumption
When we ionize a magnetic material it loses its’ magnetism
The ‘magnetic memory’ is stored nucleically, and it becomes a magnet again
when it deionizes.
The motion of the electron defines the magnetic moment


Offline Eighthman

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Re: Why Doesn't A Magnet 'Feel' Like A Gyroscope?
« Reply #49 on: April 06, 2018, 04:23:05 PM »
I can now understand why gravity and magnetism would be of the same "ilk" - as magnetism is caused by centrifugal force, spinning a bit of space around by electrons.  Compress that space/vacuum or curve it ( a la Relativity) and you've got gravity, right?

Offline AlienGrey

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Re: Why Doesn't A Magnet 'Feel' Like A Gyroscope?
« Reply #50 on: April 07, 2018, 02:11:39 PM »
I can now understand why gravity and magnetism would be of the same "ilk" - as magnetism is caused by centrifugal force, spinning a bit of space around by electrons.  Compress that space/vacuum or curve it ( a la Relativity) and you've got gravity, right?
All material is photon-electromagnetic structure so in effect it has it's own type of DNA if you like and i bet i'm not far wrong and any mass is like a huge entral pull like an electron rotating it's nucleus every thing is alive but not like us as such.

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Why Doesn't A Magnet 'Feel' Like A Gyroscope?
« Reply #51 on: April 09, 2018, 10:02:40 PM »
To understand where “gravity” comes from
We must look at the internal nucleic interactions
as well as the internal interactions of sub-particles
It is these forces that expand and contract space-time


The expanding and contracting oscillations result in gravitation
this is where unidirectionality comes into play
During the expansion part of the cycle, the space around
the mass is expanding, there is no “pushing away” force
of gravity in this form
 (there can be, but not in normal gravitation in this part of the universe)
durzing the contraction part of the cycle, the space around the mass is
contracting, everything is drawn towards it.


These are locally simultaneous events


Meaning that all particles gravitate at the same time
Although their frequencies of the gravitational moment are different
from our perspective.


Relativity controls time in a very discrete way
and the local universal conditions control the response of matter
to the universe itself.


There is nothing of sufficient mass in close proximity to us that would
change these universal conditions.


The gravitational moment is a “polarized” event, but cancels itself around
360-degrees, and is always 90-degrees to the electric moment and/or
the magnetic moment (when and where applicable)
as their driving mechanisms are all derived from the same source.


In the simple case of a sub-particle (mass) it gravitates at a frequency slightly
lower than sub-space Lambda.
Complex masses can gravitate with higher or lower frequencies, (from our perspective)
but the events are simultaneous, within the constraints of special relativity from the perspective
of either mass being observed.
And as such, results in a constant acceleration force.




Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Why Doesn't A Magnet 'Feel' Like A Gyroscope?
« Reply #52 on: April 09, 2018, 10:23:53 PM »
tiny masses without electrons, still have gravity.
and these allow us to study gravity without having to
mathematically deal with electromagnetism.






To answer the main question here:


Think about the mass of the electron
Vs the mass of a proton (for iron add 1.3 neutron mass)


c is constant, you can calculate the forces using a ground-state orbital
diameter
How much force is seen by the nucleus?
Now we must consider that no 2 of the 26 electrons can exist in the same
place at any given time
So, in which direction is this force to be manifest?


While many of these are indeed orbiting in the same direction,
they are all out of phase with each other.


with the exception of magnetized metallic hydrogen.........


Offline loner

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Re: Why Doesn't A Magnet 'Feel' Like A Gyroscope?
« Reply #53 on: July 25, 2018, 11:56:55 PM »
If you pick up a spinning gyroscope or any spinning mass, you will feel or see the effects of inertia and centrifugal force. The gyro will resist your efforts to twist away from the plane of its rotation.


OK, so why don't all permanent magnets do this? Do electrons have mass? Are they spinning? Are those spins aligned ( as the REASON WHY it has a magnetic field)? 


https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110405161715AAuefVm          I can't find any clear answer to this question. Indeed, it gets more weird as you look at it since some physics books claim that magnetism IS a form of centrifugal force.


I wonder if the answer to this question could open up some very important discoveries.
My oppinion is that magnetic field and gravitation is the same animal.