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Author Topic: Electrinium  (Read 223125 times)

Offline resonanceman

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #405 on: October 29, 2008, 06:21:04 AM »
i have a new idea.


a very thin sheet of copper foil.
a very thin layer of dried glue.
a very thin layer of steel.

like this:


copper
glue
steel
copper
glue
steel
copper
glue
steel


stack up 100 of each, in that order.
and compress all of them, with a vice!


the constant pressure of the vice, will keep them together, force them to connect, and likely cause the atomic disruption that drannom talked about.

it will last for as long as the vice can compress them.

nitinnun

That  sounds  very similar to  something else that I remember

It  had the same  configuation  except it  had copper aluminum and acrilic layers

 I believe that  it needed  a magnetic field to work .

I was thinking that it was called an  electron cascade .

I will see if I can find  it tomorow .


gary

Offline nitinnun

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #406 on: October 29, 2008, 07:30:39 AM »
acrylic glass is a polymer. just like elmers school glue!

it is mostly carbon and hydrogen. just like the glue.


but elmers school glue can be applied in very thin layers. which is what we need.
even if scrylic glass is tougher.

Offline nievesoliveras

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #407 on: October 29, 2008, 02:48:01 PM »
Hi!

@nitinnun
How many volts does it have as output? How many milliamps?

Jesus

Offline resonanceman

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #408 on: October 29, 2008, 03:00:17 PM »

Offline nitinnun

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #409 on: October 30, 2008, 09:29:50 AM »
i pressed together a very thin sheet of copper,
a very thin sheet of dried glue,
and a very thin sheet of steel.

all sheets were 1.5 inches long by 1.5 inches wide.

there was only about a 1.5 centimeters diameter, that was pressed with the vice.
the rest was unpressed.

the vice DID NOT electrically connect the copper and the steel.



the output was about half a volt, at 0.5 uA.
which is a little worse than a bunch of small wired dried in wet glue.

i think it would have worked much better, if the glue had dried onto the metals.
that way some of the glues polymers would have covalently bonded with the metal.
better integrating the polymers magnetic field, with the metals magnetic fields.

regardless, it shows something that none of us knew before.
and PROVES once and for all, that there is no freaking galvanization happening through rock solid glue!



i didn't try stacking together multiple layers.
because my interest is currently on the bedini motor.

in which i see vast potential, for my creative optimization skills.


but it would be easy as rancid firtilizer, for one of you to stack together and press dozzens of layers of copper foil, dried elmsers school glue, and steel sheeting.

Offline Koen1

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #410 on: October 30, 2008, 11:07:09 AM »
Yes, stacking different metals seperated by isolators, especially bad isolators,
will give you a voltage. And especuially when there is pressure on the stack.

You may want to check out the Zamboni or Duluc "Dry pile" in that respect;
those are basically Voltaic stacks of different metals (silver-copper for example)
that were seperated by pieces of paper, pressed together, and sealed in an isolating
layer. In contrast to the Voltaic and other Galvanic piles, they work
without having to submerge the pile in an acidic or electrolytic fluid, but on the other hand
they also produce mainly volts and very little if any amps.
It is classical electrical stuff, from way back in the 1800s or so.

I have recently made another version of such a "dry pile" to show a friend that the principle
works. The version I made consists of approximately 40 stacked layers of copper foil, kitchen
paper (the waxed kind), and aluminium foil, and measures 4cm by 4cm (by something like 2cm high).
The thing is nothing more than a stack of alu-copper-paper-alu-copper-paper-etc.
Wires are attached to the outermost aluminium and copper foil layers, and the entire thing is
squeezed together.
Last time I checked it, which was last week, it still did what it's supposed to do: after touching the
wires to eachother to allow the plates to discharge, and hooking up my multimeter, it read
a very low 0.01V which within a minute or two had risen to 0.5V, and then the self-charge speed
drops drastically and it takes another 5 minutes or so for it to reach 1V. Seems as charge increases
so does charge time, and after another 5 minutes or so, at approx 1.2V I decided I had been waiting
long enough.
This self-charge behavious is exactly what it did before, it is very similar to the same type of behaviour
as some of my past test showed, and it is exactly the type of behaviour said to describe the Duluc
and Zamboni dry piles. It is said that the electrostatic bell at Oxford is and has been powered by
such a type of dry pile since 1840 or so.
So yeah, these are electrostatic power sources. Zamboni style piles, it is said, could easily reach
the kilovolts.

But really, we've been over all this in the Crystal Cell thread. ;)

Offline nitinnun

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #411 on: October 30, 2008, 12:02:07 PM »
the electrical resistance between the 2 metals is SO HIGH, that my multimeter cannot read the resistance.
even though my multimeter can read up to several mega-ohms.

this cell does not start charging up when i connect the leads.
it is already charged up. and stays charged up forever.
until i either hsort it out or destroy it.

i seriously doubt that your0.5 volts of metals and paper, was 1/16 of an inch thick.



do you EVER type anything that is worth reading, koen1?

do you EVER type anything, that is not an attack on something?

do you EVER type a post, that is less than 80% useless-wordage?

Offline nievesoliveras

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #412 on: October 30, 2008, 01:01:29 PM »
Hi!

@nitinnun
You are always occupied on something and that is good. There is a saying that states "Keep busy and youll be alright".
I have not tried the glue battery yet, because I am waiting for a good result to start spending more money on experiments. I have spent thousands and have not gotten anything OU, but has adquired some good knowledge in the process.
Keep being as you are!

I found a battery that seems to be made with just zink an carbon, but it is short on details. I know that this for jeanna and her friends would be great to find out. I forgot to jot down the link before the machine froze though.

Jesus

Offline Koen1

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #413 on: October 30, 2008, 02:02:22 PM »
the electrical resistance between the 2 metals is SO HIGH, that my multimeter cannot read the resistance.
even though my multimeter can read up to several mega-ohms.

this cell does not start charging up when i connect the leads.
it is already charged up. and stays charged up forever.
until i either hsort it out or destroy it.
Of course. And then you short it. And then, what happens?
Surely when you short it, the voltage drops?
And then afterward it rises again?
Well, so then it doesn't stay charged forever, but it re-charges itself
after you discharged it, right?
Right. That's what I'm saying.

Quote
i seriously doubt that your0.5 volts of metals and paper, was 1/16 of an inch thick.

Hey doubt all you want. Build a Zamboni dry pile and see for yourself.
Or call Oxford and ask them about theirs.
It's easy to doubt things when you never try them.
It's easy to claim you're right when you haven't tried to falsify your statements.
But it is a well documented phenomenon and setup, the dry pile.
Just look it up.

Quote
do you EVER type anything that is worth reading, koen1?
What kind of dumb remark is that?
Are you saying that your large number of posts in which you basically revisit
old ideas of others and act as if you're the one to "discover" them are worth
more than my simple remark that you might want to investigate the phenomenon
of the dry pile? Don't be silly.

In fact, you were the one who questioned the correctness of my statements
about the dry pile and my replication of one. That is quite silly. It is like
questioning the correctness of the Galvanic cell. There is no question,
they have been around since 1800.

Quote
do you EVER type anything, that is not an attack on something?
Yes, often enough. Like for example the entire post about the dry pile.
That was clearly not an attack on anyone, it was clearly intended to point out
the dry pile to those who don't know it. Like, as it seems, you.

Do you ever take the time to just evaluate a post and see the possible positive
value of it, instead of taking everything I post as an attack? It doesn't look like you do.
Well, be like that. But don't accuse me of attacking you when I don't.

Quote
do you EVER type a post, that is less than 80% useless-wordage?
Yes. Q.E.D.

Now get back to the subject; so you claim that you have a pressurised bimetallic
junction that produces high voltage potential

Offline nievesoliveras

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #414 on: October 30, 2008, 03:46:22 PM »
Hi!

@nitinnun and koen1
It seems that there is a very strong competence between you two. But that is very healthy. When you compete you try to excel in what you are doing. So the competence between you two is going to be beneficial to the world in the long run.

Jesus

Offline nitinnun

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #415 on: October 30, 2008, 10:46:06 PM »


there is nothing healthy about listening to koen1.
he couldn't type something USEFUL, even if you held a gun to his head.

and he doesn't realize that he can't do it, either.
which gives him zero possibility for improvement.

if he ever typed anything of value, than not only was it be an accident, but it was something that someone else came up with.

Offline Dr. Tesla

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #416 on: November 02, 2008, 12:43:13 PM »

there is nothing healthy about listening to koen1.
he couldn't type something USEFUL, even if you held a gun to his head.

and he doesn't realize that he can't do it, either.
which gives him zero possibility for improvement.

if he ever typed anything of value, than not only was it be an accident, but it was something that someone else came up with.

Actually, his dry pile is a valid post, but to know that you would need to get informed. And some knowledge. While the dry pile is nothing to write home about, it does demonstrate the basic concepts of capacitance. and self-charge. However self-charging capacitance is already lifted to a higher level and there are better examples than the dry pile. And with higher energy output.

The output that beats the "electrinium" stuff pants down, by the way. And it is much simple to build and experiment with than that crap cyanide and silver-oxide sludge.

I guess, no one here, believing in the electrinium story, is capable of understanding the basic chemical fact that the sludge is energy-spent material and as such is useless for a production of any electrical charge.

So, good luck with that to those who are banging their heads at the wall about the "electrinium", you'll need it.

Offline nitinnun

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #417 on: November 02, 2008, 11:02:52 PM »
Actually, his dry pile is a valid post, but to know that you would need to get informed. And some knowledge. While the dry pile is nothing to write home about, it does demonstrate the basic concepts of capacitance. and self-charge. However self-charging capacitance is already lifted to a higher level and there are better examples than the dry pile. And with higher energy output.

The output that beats the "electrinium" stuff pants down, by the way. And it is much simple to build and experiment with than that crap cyanide and silver-oxide sludge.

I guess, no one here, believing in the electrinium story, is capable of understanding the basic chemical fact that the sludge is energy-spent material and as such is useless for a production of any electrical charge.

So, good luck with that to those who are banging their heads at the wall about the "electrinium", you'll need it.



his dry heap story is a heap of something all right.

it is a nasty piece of irrelevancy, that is NOT a constructive follow up to what i typed.
it seems designed more to sabotage and defocus, than to actually help anything.

and so do your words, "tesla". because there is nothing constructive in them either.

Offline nievesoliveras

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #418 on: November 02, 2008, 11:22:04 PM »
Hi!

I just finished reading the electromagnetic battery thread and I am very disappointed about the end results.
I thought that because electrinium making requires cyanide, that making an electromagnetic battery would be easier, but I found that I was very far from the truth.

Jesus

Offline nitinnun

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Re: Electrinium
« Reply #419 on: November 02, 2008, 11:27:32 PM »
it would be far easier to manually compress the elements you wanted.
by tightening together 2 flat metal plates, with nuts and bolts.

sort of like what i want to do with my 1/16 inch glue cell.