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Gravity powered devices => Gravity powered devices => Topic started by: Alexioco on May 24, 2008, 04:53:36 PM

Title: Overunity?
Post by: Alexioco on May 24, 2008, 04:53:36 PM
Ok I just found an extremely simple mechanism that does something interesting, before I show you though I have a question.

Suppose I have two weights, one falls one foot lifting the other weight 4 foot up, is that more output then input?
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: gyulasun on May 24, 2008, 05:22:42 PM
Hi,

If I assume the two weights are equal (you did not state) then it sounds overunity indeed...

Gyula
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: Alexioco on May 24, 2008, 06:02:37 PM
Yes the weights are equal, well this is what I have...

The weight on the right only has to fall so far to lift the other weight on the lever a full half circle due to where the the string is attached on the lever, It uses a pulley


Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: broli on May 24, 2008, 06:20:28 PM
Could you please make a more clear drawing, oh and please use colors so you can refer to what the colors are in your explanations.
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: AB Hammer on May 24, 2008, 06:43:44 PM
Greetings Alex

 Your diagram it fine, but your question seem to not work with the diagram. You asked if one weight falling one foot lift another four feet. It would depend on the speed of the first weight. This is what is missing out of the question for a good answer. This is also where Physics can kick butt. What you are looking at is an energy transfer effect.
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: Alexioco on May 24, 2008, 07:11:16 PM
Could you please make a more clear drawing, oh and please use colors so you can refer to what the colors are in your explanations.

Here we go, when the lever on the right falls to the right, it will lift the other lever 4 times higher...



Alan;

So what can I learn from this thing I found, could it be used in a wheel?
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: shruggedatlas on May 24, 2008, 07:40:56 PM
Here we go, when the lever on the right falls to the right, it will lift the other lever 4 times higher...

Based on the diagram, it will not do that.
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: Alexioco on May 24, 2008, 07:48:50 PM
Based on the diagram, it will not do that.

Not drawn to scale
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: AB Hammer on May 24, 2008, 09:19:31 PM
@ Alex

 I must be missing something here, or you are not making yourself clear.
I do allot of leverage test and weight test, and I am not sure what you are doing, with this one. But if you want to know there are several ways to move 4lbs. with just 1lb. using leverage, but most of those ways don't work in wheels.

 We would need a better diagram to be able to discuss it. E-mail me if you need to limit its exposer.
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: Alexioco on May 24, 2008, 09:45:25 PM
nah its ok, it was just an idea I though I would share...
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: gyulasun on May 24, 2008, 11:55:55 PM
nah its ok, it was just an idea I though I would share...

Well, Alexioco will you share it once you drew attention and asked the question?

Gyula
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: Alexioco on May 25, 2008, 12:41:13 AM
The lever on the left (weight A) will be lifted up a full half circle when the little lever (weight B) falls down a half circle.

The difference between both weights is that weight A travels a much further distance than weight B through the use of the pulley, so because of this, I was asking, is this overunity?

Here is another way of putting it.

When weight B has fallen and stopped at point X
Weight B will have raised and stopped at point Y
and they both get their points at the same time meaning that weight B must of also traveled faster than weight A

I have tested the idea without the weights and the mechanism works...
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: broli on May 25, 2008, 10:03:28 AM
Yes I understand your idea but this isn't going to work if the weights are the same.The right weight needs to be x times heavier than the left one to make this mechanism work. Since the closer you get to the pivot of that long lever the bigger force you need.
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: gyulasun on May 25, 2008, 11:35:36 AM
The lever on the left (weight A) will be lifted up a full half circle when the little lever (weight B) falls down a half circle.

The difference between both weights is that weight A travels a much further distance than weight B through the use of the pulley, so because of this, I was asking, is this overunity?

Here is another way of putting it.

When weight B has fallen and stopped at point X
Weight B will have raised and stopped at point Y
and they both get their points at the same time meaning that weight B must of also traveled faster than weight A

I have tested the idea without the weights and the mechanism works...


Hi Alexioco,

Because you have not used weights yet, would you tell or check what is the weight ratio or how the weights of the two arms you used are related? Are they of the same weight or due to their lenght difference the left hand side arm is heavier than the arm on the right side?

Thanks,  Gyula
Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: pese on May 25, 2008, 12:37:00 PM
it both weight are equal
if both leverage are equal
if both moving way of weight (lengh) are at minimum equal
than is OU.

The drawlings here, will not shown this

If the moved way in output  ist longer that this from input  ( with 2 equal weigths)
Than you have an additionally  Power
This can  drive itself also more additionally devices (on your choise).

Hoping that another "Bessler" find this again....

That Power is existing !

GP

Title: Re: Overunity?
Post by: Alexioco on May 25, 2008, 01:26:01 PM
Yes I understand your idea but this isn't going to work if the weights are the same.The right weight needs to be x times heavier than the left one to make this mechanism work. Since the closer you get to the pivot of that long lever the bigger force you need.

You are right, so weight A would have to be heavier than weight B