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Author Topic: Kicks explained  (Read 45201 times)

Offline poynt99

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2008, 03:04:41 PM »
the speed of sound through copper is 3800 m/s. what speed are you referring to with electrons and 50000 km/s?

Offline aleks

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #16 on: April 13, 2008, 04:37:37 PM »
the speed of sound through copper is 3800 m/s. what speed are you referring to with electrons and 50000 km/s?

Atomic lattice phonons travel at 3800m/s, that's why any phonon non-equilibrium is dissolved slowly. Electrons in potential field travel much faster - well, maybe slower than 50000km/s, but should be close to that number.

Also, are you aware that modern science accepts existence of Copper pairs meaning two electrons that travel at equal velocity bounce phonons between each other? This is how superconductivity is described on micro level. Well, this is a stupid explanation because phonons should lead to repelling (due to excessive pressure between bodies), but what if in Copper pairs a local gravity is created that sticks electrons together?
« Last Edit: April 13, 2008, 05:00:29 PM by aleks »

Offline z_p_e

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #17 on: April 13, 2008, 05:54:14 PM »
sorry..change my mind

Offline poynt99

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2008, 06:44:46 PM »
are you sure cooper pairs would only have repulsion between them? why couldn't they alternate between attraction and repulsion due to high and low pressure changes?

double-check your electron speed through copper, it's many magnitudes slower

Offline aleks

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #19 on: April 13, 2008, 07:07:13 PM »
are you sure cooper pairs would only have repulsion between them? why couldn't they alternate between attraction and repulsion due to high and low pressure changes?

They'll alternate only if they form a system in the first place (like an atomic lattice). And it is exactly where existence of 'gravity' is necessary in the equation. Generally, electron's electrostatic field repels other electrons.

double-check your electron speed through copper, it's many magnitudes slower
So, you really think electrons move at a speed of 0.00024 m/sec in copper (for about 1.5A, 0.5mm2)? Unfortunately, this is a deduction from a model, there is no real measured electron speeds in copper available to my knowledge.

In either case, if electron speeds are unsatisfactory to you, it is absolutely possible to change them to EM waves. There is a known effect exists called 'pressure of light', which means that EM waves can excitate phonons. This is even more important as theory exists for such interaction. The pressure scales as the fourth power of solid's temperature which interacts with EM waves. This may be in concordance with Otto's circuit's observed behavior that his circuit starts to 'kick' when MOSFET heaters achieve a certain temperature.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2008, 07:45:02 PM by aleks »

Offline sparks

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2008, 07:54:34 PM »
   The pulse energy does not have to navigate the atomic lattice.  The MOLECULAR structuring of the conductor allows for overlap of the valence orbitals with the conduction band.  This overlap creates an electron cloud.  The pulse potential can travel through this cloud much faster than if it had to travel from atom to atom.  This electron cloud may have some sticky electron pairing due to magnetic dipole moment relations,  Snowflakes. :)  I believe that the electrons in this conduction band are influenced by the ambient magnetic field.  Their lack of an electric dipole moment causes them to align their magnetic dipole moment with the ambient magnetic field.  When a voltage gradient is applied to this magnetically structered ELECTRON lattice there is a scalar wave produced.  The electrons travel in a response to the applied voltage with aligned magnetic dipole moments.  The magnetic and electric fields surrounding the conductor are changing in a unified manner.
   It can be seen that this is only going to go on until the electron cloud is depleted and the voltage starts to go to work on the sub-valence energy shells.  This is the ordinary response of a conductor to impressed voltage. The atomic lattice itself will be responding to the impressed voltage with all sorts of electric dipole  and magnetic dipole moments of the neucleus and electrons getting into the play.
   I don't believe this kick phenomenon is the scource of OU.  It is just the production of a scalar wave energy field.

Offline poynt99

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2008, 08:51:03 PM »
So, you really think electrons move at a speed of 0.00024 m/sec in copper (for about 1.5A, 0.5mm2)? Unfortunately, this is a deduction from a model, there is no real measured electron speeds in copper available to my knowledge.

electron sharing is the basis for chemical reactions, it works, and makes perfect sense in metallic conductors as well. how can you throw this out so quickly when there have been no other explanations to cover how electron flow behaves? Tom Bearden subscribes to this and he's a nuclear physicist, and proponent of free energy.

Offline aleks

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2008, 09:04:42 PM »
electron sharing is the basis for chemical reactions, it works, and makes perfect sense in metallic conductors as well. how can you throw this out so quickly when there have been no other explanations to cover how electron flow behaves? Tom Bearden subscribes to this and he's a nuclear physicist, and proponent of free energy.
Well, let's forget about it. I have collision theory, electron sharing has nothing to do with electric current in my opinion since electric current is based on free electrons where as electron sharing is based on ions with ions being something 'stable'. There is of course ionic electric current available, but then again - why not see moving ions interacting with free electrons? This will be also leading to collisions, and ions themselves will react on potentials hence working as charged particles.

Let's not beat a dead horse if you will. So, continuing, what are you objections about EM waves in this scenario?

Offline poynt99

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #23 on: April 13, 2008, 09:35:50 PM »
the idea of electron sharing is the exchange of electrons.

electrons are given up and gained in a daisy-chain fashion. these are the free electrons, the conduction electrons I am talking about.

electrons boiled off a hot filament are a different story, and so in this case they do travel quite fast, depending on the voltage gradient. particle acceleration.

what you mean by changing electrons to EM waves, in what context?

Offline aleks

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2008, 08:48:16 AM »
what you mean by changing electrons to EM waves, in what context?
In context of phonon excitation. Fast EM waves, slow phonons -> a lot of powerful phonon non-equilibriums.

Well, you probably know much and you will by all means try to prove there is no such thing as DC acoustic wave possible and you are talking that TPUs are no overunity, so your words in this context may not be of much value after all. Just be warned - there is no need to spend your valuable time proving I'm fool knowing nothing.

Offline sparks

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #25 on: April 14, 2008, 01:54:25 PM »
       A conductor shares electrons to fill it's outer valence shell.  All the good conductors are looking for 7 electrons to become noble.  Electron pairing is now a problem.  This leaves an electron pair with one of the electrons only weakly attracted to the atomic lattice.  These electrons are the ones that it is easy to play with.  Magnetically and electrically.  I believe these electrons bubble up to the surface of the conductor and we get the skin effect.

Offline allcanadian

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #26 on: April 14, 2008, 03:19:36 PM »
There may be an easier answer, the kick is associated with the rapid closure of a switch closing the circuit of a conductor usually containing higher voltages. We know all conductors have the properties of inductance and capacitance, and the storage capacitity of a capacitance increases greatly when the potential difference across a dielectric is increased. What we seem unwilling to concede is the fact that the dielectric could be the space surrounding a conductor, the conductor is one plate---- the space surrounding the conductor the other. In this case a disruption in the media could produce a temporary storage of energy in the dielectric surrounding a conductor which must discharge itself in order to find balance. Or in cases of extremly large disruptions this dielectric wave could radiate outward, this wave like one capacitor charging the one next to it in a progressive fashion. We could compare this scenario to a lightning strike, the lightning strikes because the potential difference has become so great it causes the dielectric (air) to break down forming a conductive path. Maybe we should consider what may happen if the dielectric does not break down but does never the less conduct.
Just a thought

Offline sparks

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #27 on: April 14, 2008, 04:04:51 PM »
     @all canadien   

I believe that when we get the electric field fluctuating with the magnetic field in alignment we get scalar waves.  The collapsing magnetic field producing an electrical current and the electrical current  producing the magnetic field over and over again in the same spot.  As you noted this electrical current does not have to go to the length of ionizing the air,  just causing an open air capacitor charging and discharging.  This is what Tesla did.  His lightning was just to awe the audience.
   Meanwhile scalar waves were time traveling right through them.   :D

Offline Grumpy

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #28 on: April 14, 2008, 04:23:24 PM »
Doh!

Offline Grumpy

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Re: Kicks explained
« Reply #29 on: April 14, 2008, 06:09:19 PM »
If the space surrounding the conductor is a "dielectric", then how can it be the "other" plate?  The "other plate" is a different part of the same conductor.