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Author Topic: notes from Linden, Switzerland  (Read 25784 times)

Offline hartiberlin

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Re: notes from Linden, Switzerland
« Reply #30 on: February 16, 2008, 02:28:03 AM »
Now I finally found it again here
from Tim?s site:

http://www.americanantigravity.com/plasmavolt.html

The same principle the Testatika and the Morray devices are based off.

Betavoltaic's PlasmaVolt Technology
By Tim Ventura, August 7, 2003

World Exlusive from American Antigravity: Batteries that run for years on end, promising endless energy from a clean, safe, environmentally-friendly fusion technology. This is the one man's incredible journey into a branch of physics that isn't supposed to exist - low energy transmutation of elements.

It's the middle of August and I'm standing in the basement of a house a few miles outside of Redmond, grateful to be in a cool area. The room itself is as large as the main floor of the aging brick house above it, but it's a completely separate entity - the only entrance is a semi-hidden door with a tarnished padlock hanging off the edge of it.

I hadn't seen the entrance to the basement I was now in from the street, due to an abundance of sun-bleached weeds blocking the view through the short driveway. The house itself hadn't been much more visible, as the bricks on the outside had aged enough to make it seem almost invisible next to the other houses in this middle-class suburban neighborhood. This house was only a few miles outside of Redmond, and just a few blocks away from my own home, but as I'd entered through the door I'd realized that this was an entirely different world than anything in the surrounding area.

From what I can now see of the basement's interior, it appears that this house was built in the 1960's or 70's - it certainly doesn't appear new, but I'm also not smelling that thick damp musk that accompanies the interior of a lot of older homes in the Pacific Northwest when they begin to age.

A series of metal racks fill the wall space along most of the interior of the basement - a few of the racks have recognizable objects in them, such as a set of 30 or 40 large glass jars containing what appears to be herbs - I can read names like "Ginseng" and "Gotu-Kola" scrawled in magic marker on the screw-top lids. Not everything down here is immediately recognizable, though - several pieces of large equipment are strategically placed amidst the racks, and while I recognize one of them as a gigantic oscilloscope, the rest are unknown. Most of the equipment in the lab can be identified as electronics equipment, but there is so much of it that it tends to blur together into a gigantic collection of parts and gizmo's - a visual collage of technology in a very raw form.

This basement is the "secret lab" of experimenter Merlin Del Orion - a white-bearded gentleman in his late 60's that bears more than a little resemblance to his namesake from the age of Camelot. In addition to the physical resemblance, a slim pair of spectacles adds a bit more to his personal mysticism. I suddenly realize that perhaps I'm projecting - in addition to being a former Boeing employee and long-time electronics experimenter and engineer, Merlin is also one of the few practicing alchemists in the modern world. While in many ways a wizard, he is also well versed in contemporary science.

Merlin pauses to adjust his spectacles and frowns slightly, with one eyebrow curling up just slightly. "Betavoltaic cell?" he asks, questioningly. I've just finished telling him about my encounter with businessman and inventor Michael McDonnough, and a remarkable new technology that I've been building a page for on the American Antigravity website. "It's a nuclear battery," I tell him, "using a method of stimulating the decay of a nuclear isotope to produce abundant, safe and clean electric energy. I don't know if it's for real or not, though, because I haven't actually seen one yet."

Merlin walks over to a shelf in one of the racks covering the entire back-wall of the basement. I can recognize an electric typewriter and several other pieces of electronics test-equipment on the shelf, but what he pulls out of a shadowy area is unrecognizable. "Oh, they work," he says, "Here's one that I've been tinkering with for the last few months".

The device that Merlin is holding is obviously a piece of electronics equipment, but I can't really place many of the parts on it. Mounted on a 1-foot square epoxy circuit board, I recognize the familiar dull-green plastic case of a high-voltage flyback transformer, and after realizing what that component is I then recognize the multi-vibrator circuit that feeds it - a set of two transistors set to pulse at a specific frequency through the flyback to power the device.

Flyback transformers are used in television sets and HV-experimental equipment to step up a low-voltage input current to a high-voltage output, and can be further connected either directly to a rectifier diode or instead to a Cockroft-Walton voltage multiplier, which then steps the voltage up even further. These devices are almost always used in circuits with a high-voltage direct-current output, probably because it's much easier to simply use a neon-transformer than go through the trouble of putting together a flyback circuit if high-voltage AC is required.

In this case, I can't recognize the circuits that the flyback is connected to - they're utterly meaningless to me, and they appear to connect to an even stranger device - a round metallic post with a metal ball mounted on the top of it, which gives the entire board and its apparatus the appearance of being a scale-model of an airport traffic-control tower assembled by a deranged electronics technician.

"Wait a second", I tell him, "this nuclear battery technology is totally new stuff - even Michael McDonnough doesn't have a prototype that he can demonstrate for me yet. You're actually telling me that this device is a working model of a nuclear battery?"

Merlin responds by launching immediately into an explanation of how the device works, and explains to me that the flyback transformer powers a circuit that provides the stimulating charge to the nuclear isotope, which in this prototype is contained in the metal ball located at the top of the post. It turns out that this isn't a strange model of an airport traffic control-tower after all, and I can see what he's talking about in more detail as he twists at a seam in the middle of the metal ball and lifts off the top portion for me to look inside. The ball contains a collection of maybe 20 or 30 small pellets. From their dull-gray metallic color, these might as well be made of lead or pewter, but I know better as I realize that they are the Americum-241 pellets used to provide ionizing radiation in smoke detectors. "I had to pry these out of the little epoxy cases that they're normally housed in within the smoke detector", Merlin tells me, "and they're safe as long as you wash your hands after touching them."

Merlin explains to me that this device must be primed initially by being connected to the flyback transformer. After external power has been applied and a static-charge initiated through the special control-circuits running into the isotope chamber, the isotope becomes self-sustaining for a period of time and generates its own electricity as the decay-rate of the Americum-241 accelerates and releases a steady stream of high-voltage electrons. Merlin's device isn't perfect though - it won't self power indefinitely after it has been initially activated. "I put it on the oscilloscope a while back," he says, "and it basically rings. It doesn't generate enough electricity to completely self-power, and that's mostly because of inefficiencies in the feedback-circuits that I've designed. The result is that as the power winds down the overall static-charge in the device decays very slowly when compared with an inert test-sample, which provides a ring-curve on the oscilloscope. I'm planning on modifying the circuitry to allow it to completely feedback the electricity that the isotope generates through the stimulation circuit in the near future - that should let it run indefinitely, and after that I can attempt to draw high-voltage electricity from it to power other projects. For the moment, though, it just rings ..."

Merlin's nuclear-battery does more than just ring, though - and both he and I know it. After spending a good 4 hours earlier in the week on the phone with Michael McDonnough, I know that the electricity given off by Merlin's Americum-241 battery when it 'rings' is accompanied by an enormous surge of nuclear-energy in the form of high-energy neutrons and protons. I know that Merlin also realizes this, because the inside of the reflective metal-ball that the isotopes sit inside is lined with at least 1/8th inch thick lead-shielding. After taking into consideration the possibility that I might want to actually have children in the future, I decide not to ask him for a demonstration of the device - at least not today.

Betavoltaic's Two-Stage Process

It's August 2003 - almost exactly one year after Merlin's demonstration of the stimulated decay cell, and I'm sitting at a desk in the basement of my home on the phone with Michael McDonnough. At 40 years old, he's old enough to be experienced in business, but still young enough to follow his dreams. The dream that we're discussing is his vision of environmentally-friendly stimulated-decay technology in the commercial marketplace, and he seems sensible and motivated enough that he just might pull it off.

""Hold on a second", he tells me. I can hear him talking to somebody else on his end of the phone, but it's difficult to tell what he's saying. After a moment he's back, "Sorry about that, Tim - I'm in the living room because it's not as hot here, but this is a busy area." In my location in the Pacific Northwest it's a cool 55 degrees outside and raining, but at his residence in Tulsa it's 11 o'clock at night and still sweltering from the August heat wave.

I've been telling McDonnough about the article that I'm putting together on the stimulated decay technology and the Americum-241 battery that Merlin's shown me. "You know," he says, after a pause, "devices like that just aren't commercially feasible at the present time. For instance, nobody is going to be able to get onto a plane with a cell-phone powered by a Strontium-90 nuclear battery. It would set off alarms all over the place -- that's what makes our new PlasmaVolt technology so remarkable - when its not in operation its basically inert."

The basis for Betavoltaic's technology is a clean, safe version of stimulated nuclear-decay technology based on the theoretical research of Dr. Ruggero Santilli and the experimental research of Ted Gagnon. Dr. Santilli's research had shown that with a specific static-charge applied to a nuclear isotope it can be made to break down at a sustained rate in comparison with a control sample.

What this means is that a beta-emitting isotope (one that emits primarily electrons as it decays) can be forced electronically to emit the same number of electrons in an hour as it ordinarily might emit in a year or more. Therefore, instead of a scant-few electrons being emitted from the isotope under normal conditions, the same isotope in a charge-stimulated environment may emit enough to actually comprise a current - perhaps micro amps or even milliamps worth of electricity.

This is what Merlin had shown me - a first generation Betavoltaic cell. The device operates by placing a high-voltage waveform on a small sample of beta-emitting isotope, which then emits electricity as the rate of decay increases.

Michael McDonnough has taken the research of Dr. Santilli one step further, by combining it with the experimental work of Ted Gagnon to create a two-stage process for a Betavoltaic commercial product line. Thus, the PlasmaVolt was born. This device comprises the second part of the Betavoltaic technology base - an environmentally-friendly fusion device, built to deliver electricity reliably for years on end without any harmful byproducts.

The PlasmaVolt is a device developed by inventor and experimenter Ted Gagnon that uses a plasma-vortex to allow the generation of electricity in a low-pressure reactor cavity. While the details of the PlasmaVolt are still proprietary, the device is covered under both US and International Patents, and McDonnough tells me that they have a prototype device on site that has been delivering a constant 50-watt electrical output for several months. In addition to generating electrical energy, the PlasmaVolt generates K40, which McDonnough plans to use in Betavoltaic's nuclear-batteries, due to its high-level of safety and very long decay times.

"Ted Gagnon's technology utilizes inverse quotient potential envelopes," McDonnough said, "This involves loading frequencies (the envelope) corresponding to quantum potentials into a proprietary liquid formula in which the Betavoltaic material is suspended. Once the quantum potentials have been applied to the liquid by the means of a caduceus-coil acting as a tuned antenna, the beta-emitter in solute is perpetually stimulated to emit electrons as a result of these quantum potential states."

The result of Gagnon's technology being utilized in conjunction with the low-energy transmutation research of Dr. Santilli is that isotopes can be utilized with such a normal low decay rate that they are considered for all intents and purposes to be "inert materials". McDonnough tells me that "The primary isotope is K40 (an isotope of Potassium), with a half-life of approximately 1.7 billion years. It has an 89% ratio of calcium formation, featuring a double beta-decay with energy levels of 1.311 Mev (Million Electron Volts)."

Essentially this means that K40 takes so long to decay under normal circumstances that its basically an inert substance - but when it does decay it releases an enormous amount of energy. "It's the perfect fuel for beta-decay because if the Betavoltaic cell is accidentally ruptured during operation K40 goes back to being extremely low in activity," McDonnough tells me, "K40 allows us to throttle the isotope decay. It's a nearly perfect process, because it only releases energy under stimulation, and in the event of a critical failure it immediately ceases energy production." In science, K40 is stable enough that it has little scientific use other than in studying biological systems using a highly bio-available and generally stable isotope. Betavoltaic expects to not only be the only market for this substance, but also expects to be the only supplier - it turns out that K40 is a byproduct of the contained PlasmaVolt power-systems that they plan on manufacturing this year.

The PlasmaVolt

The PlasmaVolt is a device developed by Ted Gagnon that creates a sustained plasma-vortex for a unique method of energy production based on the low-energy transmutation of elements. "The PlasmaVolt Technology will allow us to produce unlimited amounts of K40 isotope as per Santilli's low-energy transmutation theory," states Michael McDonnough, "Our existing prototype PlasmaVolt has already produced over 6 grams of nearly pure K40 this year." He begins to get excited while telling me this, then elaborating, "with the exception of K40 deposited on Earth from distant supernovae events, we've got the only source for this isotope on the planet! The K40 produced as a byproduct in commercial nuclear reactors is thoroughly contaminated with heavier isotopes, and produced only in tiny quantities. We've got 6+ grams of the stuff, and it's almost perfectly pure!"

One of the reasons that McDonnough is so excited about the production capability of Potassium40 is due to the sheer energy storage potential of the isotope. He tells me that "A kilogram of K40 has the same energy content as 35,000 gallons of gasoline"....assuming, that is, that it can be made to release that energy using the proprietary Betavoltaic technologies. Michael McDonnough insists that this is not only theoretically possible, but that its been demonstrated in the lab, "Ted Gagnon has already reached 200% stimulation using a very initial and inefficient frequency envelope, and he is currently conducting research on our behalf to create a much more efficient envelope for commercial use."

The PlasmaVolt almost looks like a tall, skinny blender in appearance -- it consists of a long, thin quartz tube that rises up from a square-black base containing control electronics. A coil of wire is wrapped around the upper-most portion of the tube, and obscures the interior of the otherwise transparent container from view. Located underneath the coil of wire, out of sight from my prying eyes, is the cathode at which transmutation occurs and energy is created. McDonnough tells me that the PlasmaVolt is impossible to replicate without knowing the shape of the cathode and composition of the anode.

Functionally, the PlasmaVolt operates in many ways as a conventional low-pressure plasma-reactor. The elongated tube is pumped full of Hydrogen, and the pressure is then reduce with a vacuum-pump to the desired operating pressure to maximize energy production. A unique electromagnetic charge is used to stimulate the hydrogen into a rotating column of energetic plasma, and the exterior coil is then used to reclaim that energy to prevent excessive loss. The energy input and reclaimed through the electromagnetic coil apparatus wound around the tube occurs nearly without loss, because the low-pressure of the gas allows energy input and extraction from the kinetic rotational energy of the hydrogen without many of the normal friction problems occurring in a higher-pressure container.

Main power from the PlasmaVolt is drawn from the cathode at the top chamber. Obscured from view by the coil apparatus, the cathode facilitates low-energy transmutation of Hydrogen into K40 by a unique and innovative method. What McDonnough claims is occurring inside the device is that Hydrogen molecules are first split from H2 into single atom by the high-voltage ionizing charge, and are then reduced even further by having the same ionizing energy strip the electron from the Hydrogen atom -- leaving only a single proton, which is all that an ionized Hydrogen atom consists of. The transmutation process is supposed to involve these single protons descending into the seed-material of the cathode to build it up, which eventually results in the production of K40. Most people are aware that the heavier elements consist of both protons and neutrons -- from what I've been able to gather protons are added easily via the addition of ionized hydrogen to the cathode structure, and the neutrons are supposedly created through an extra reactive-step in line with Santilli's low-energy transmutation theory.

The idea behind the PlasmaVolt seems similar in a very general sense to what is believed to occur during the infamous Pons and Fleischman "Cold Fusion" process so rigorously investigated during the 1990's. While the scientific community in general remains very skeptical about the Cold Fusion concept, a growing body of scientists is now convinced that putting Hydrogen-ions in close proximity with heavier metals can allow low-energy transmutations to occur that release energy in the process. In the case of Cold Fusion, the method involves immersing an anode and cathode in a body of water made conductive through the addition of specific salts - the PlasmaVolt takes this idea one step further by allowing the effect to happen in a plasma chamber, where the higher energy-levels of the ions and increased reactance should facilitate the production of larger amounts of power.

The PlasmaVolt is currently patented under both US and international patenting authorities, and Betavoltaic is in the process of having both of those sets of patents assigned from the current holders to themselves prior to the launch of their initial product offerings.

McDonnough indicated that the PlasmaVolt technology will reach the market much sooner than the K40 Betavoltaic technology will, mostly because Betavoltaic Incorporated plans on recycling used PlasmaVolt cells as their primary base for obtaining K40 for the Betavoltaic cells. It's a two stage process: McDonnough expects commercial PlasmaVolt systems to begin going on the market in early 2004. The K40 isotope that these cells produce as a byproduct will be extracted during recycling for use in powering the Betavoltaic power-cells that BVI intends to launch commercially within the next 18 months.

The initial product launch utilizing the PlasmaVolt power-cells is targeted towards the computer-industry - more specifically, McDonnough tells me that the best market segment to target is Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS) systems for commercial computers. He believes that the 400-watt PlasmaVolt will serve in this capacity well, as it should be capable of providing continuous operation producing 400-watts of power for up to 2 years. "The Plasmavolts will look like oversized vacuum-tubes", he tells me, "They're going to look really cool....imagine the engine-core from the Starship Enterprise, and you start to get the idea." Despite the look of the device, he figures that the 400-watt PlasmaVolt should measure about 19x14x4 inches - small enough to fit inside a suitcase sized device, and weighing in at only 8 pounds. This is important for products like backup power-supplies, as space is at a premium, and McDonnough hopes to also come up with a rack-mountable version of the device for direct storage in data-center server-racks. In the rack mountable version of this concept, he envisions the tubes being pluggable into the rack, meaning that by simply opening the rack and removing the tubes one at a time you can maintain constant power and still swap out old Plasmavolts.

Soon to follow on McDonnough's product list is the planned development of a self-powered "luggable" supercomputer. "This would be great for military applications", I told him, keeping in mind the news footage of server-farms and remote power-stations currently being toted around the Iraqi countryside by US personnel. He envisioned something like a machine incorporating a 19-inch TFT-LCD monitor, 8-gigs of RAM, 500-gigs of hard-drive space, and twin 2.6 gigahertz Xeon processors. "With the PlasmaVolt providing power for up to 2 years continuously," he tells me," power-intensive computing device like this suddenly become much more portable." I guess that he has a point - in my experience with the Mil-Spec "toughbooks" that AT&T Wireless relied on for field-operations computing, a lot of performance ends up being sacrificed in order to get every once of use out of the ever-too-small battery packs.


Non-Stimulated Nuclear Batteries

Betavoltaic's two-stage approach isn't the only approach to providing electrical energy directly from beta-decay, although admittedly it may be the safest. In December 2002 I had the opportunity to find out about conventional nuclear beta-decay batteries during a call to inventor and scientist Bob Lazar, formerly of Area 51 fame. Bob became a media sensation when he went to the press in 1989 with a story about being an employee at Area 51 hired to reverse-engineer captured UFO's - Lazar now runs the United Nuclear company in Arizona, which specializes in (among other things) manufacturing Geiger counters for use by the government and several commercial organizations. The United Nuclear website features a collection of naturally-occurring radioactive rocks on the front page that Lazar has collected from trips to the desert, which prompted me to ask Bob if he'd ever considered building a nuclear battery with any of them. "Sure," Lazar replied, "using a piece of radioactive rock to build a simple nuclear battery is easy. You simply get a glass vial and run a wire into the glass until it touches the rock - this is your positive potential. You then suspend another wire inside of the glass vial, but not touching the rock - current will flow between these two wires, although it won't be a large amount, and you can't use it for much."

Lazar told me that he'd actually built two or three batteries like this, and it's a relatively simple and inexpensive process to do (assuming that you have a radioactive rock to start with). A nuclear battery built in this manner is a non-stimulated device, and has several drawbacks. The major drawback is that they don't produce an appreciable amount of power, and use a substantial amount of isotopic rock in the process. Another drawback is that the naturally-occurring radioactive isotope that Lazar had used emits not only electrons, but also a fair amount of neutron and proton radiation - which means that its probably not suitable for a cell-phone battery, even with shielding. The final drawback is something that Lazar mentioned to me nearly on accident. "You know," he said, "I can send you one of them. I can send you one of the nuclear batteries that I've built - I think that you might get at least a couple of milliamps of high-voltage current from it. But now that I think about it, the major problem with mailing it to you is the fact that you can't turn these things off.....it'll be producing a high-voltage trickle of charge all the way through the postal system, which will set off all sorts of alarms."

Biefeld-Brown Applications

My interest in Betavoltaic cells began primarily with regard to the Lifter technology. The Biefeld-Brown effect levitation technology requires a high-voltage direct-current electrical output, which just happens to be the native-output for Betavoltaic cells. Under stimulated decay conditions, electrons are emitted from the isotope at extremely high-voltages, and as they build up on the gold-plated internal collectors, the resulting charge is also a high-voltage electrical potential.

The conventional power-source for Lifter technology is based on a Cockroft-Walton voltage multiplier, which literally just an array of high-voltage diodes and capacitors that are charged and discharged cyclically by a flyback-transformer. The 50,000 volt power-supply that I use from Information Unlimited utilizes an almost textbook approach to a Cockroft-Walton voltage multiplier: a two-transistor multi-vibrator provides 250-watts of power to a heavy-duty flyback transformer, which converts the electricity from an initial voltage of 115 VAC to 3,000 VAC out of the flyback. It also increases the frequency of the charge, from the normal 60 Hz of the power-line on the input side to 13,000+ hertz on the output side of the flyback. This is because flyback transformers are designed to operate more efficiently at higher frequencies - the overall result is a 3,000 volt, 13 kilohertz waveform that comes out of the flyback and is pumped directly into the Cockroft-Walton voltage multiplier.

As I mentioned before, the Cockroft-Walton voltage multiplier is a very basic array of diodes and capacitors, connected to the output of the flyback. During the positive (+) cycle of the flyback's output, the CW multiplier charges the internal capacitor-bank in parallel - perhaps 16 capacitors charging at 3,000 volts each. On the output side of the duty cycle, the CW multiplier then discharges the entire array of capacitors in series - which steps up the voltage from 3,000 volts to 48,000 volts. The only drawback to this process is that the output current of the CW multiplier is reduced by a multiple at least equal to the increase in voltage - hence, voltage is multiplied sixteen-fold, but the output current is 16-times weaker.

As you can see, Cockroft-Walton based high-voltage power-supplies have some very definite limitations. In addition to low output current, these devices are a bit on the heavy side for Antigravity research - my 'lightweight' GRA-50 supply contains at least 5 pounds of parts and shielding. Finally, the kiss of death for the CW-based power-supplies is the fact that they require a "wall-socket umbilical cord" at all times - in other words, unless you have a really lightweight 115 VAC battery your CW multiplier won't be very useful unless you have a really long extension cord. While experiments such as Saviour in Belgium have been experimenting with building stripped down "ultra lightweight" versions of the CW multiplier for use in Lifters, the entire concept has some glaring limitations - perhaps limitations that Betavoltaic technology can readily overcome.

Unlike a CW multiplier, Betavoltaic cells produce a high-voltage stream of electrons as a natural by- product of the stimulated decay process. Betavoltaic cells are also readily adaptable to producing a variable amount of current, and have the possibility of readily exceeding the limitations of the CW multiplier in terms of power. By simply varying the amount of energy that's put into the feedback loop through the stimulation-circuitry, it may be possible to produce all the high-voltage direct-current that you would ever need for an onboard Lifter power-supply.

Michael McDonnough isn't waiting around for Biefeld-Brown technology to mature before beginning his aerospace efforts - in fact, he already has a tentative plan for a high-output plasma drive based on the PlasmaVolt technology. "You know", he said, "We can scale these things up to a Gigawatt without any real difficulties." A gigawatt of power is substantially greater than the largest plasma-drives that NASA has experimented with, which are bulky and generate only kilowatts of energy.

McDonnough's vision of the PlasmaVolt as a tool for space exploration involves connecting the device to an acceleration chamber to create a stream of Plasma out the back end of the device. Therefore, whether or not the Lifter is the tool that the PlasmaVolt ends up powering, it seems doubtless that this device will make its way into space in one way or another.

Conclusion

Certain nuclear isotopes emit electrons when they break down - these are called "beta-emitting" isotopes. The electrons that are released during this natural decay process can be collected to provide a useable stream of electrical energy. According to the research of Dr. Ruggero Santilli, the rate of the decay process can be increased to provide electrical energy on-demand. The experimental work of Ted Gagnon has further shown that by providing an 'envelope' of harmonic electrical impulses into a liquid medium, this process of stimulated decay can be further increased to provide useable power from isotopes that would otherwise have a very low rate of decay.

Building a nuclear battery isn't hard to do - Bob Lazar's comments indicate that generating electricity in this manner can be as simple as putting a rock inside a glass jar, but doing this safely is another thing entirely, and that has prevented the commercial marketing of nuclear batteries for commercial applications up until now.

Over the course of the last year, the Betavoltaic Corporation has moved from a theoretical approach to a successful prototype for a unique power-generation process. They don't have the only technology to deliver electricity from nuclear isotopes, but they do have what appears to be the safest process.

Electron-emitting beta-isotopes are capable of storing incredible amounts of energy in a tiny package - this makes them suitable for a variety of applications that require the delivery of electrical power over a long-term period of time without interruption or recharging. In addition to applications such as microelectronics that require conventional power, the high voltages inherent in beta-decay make them suitable for Biefeld-Brown technologies, or at least allow the possibility of high-voltage energy production with lighter-weight apparatus than the Cockroft-Walton voltage-multipliers currently popular among experimenters.

Time will tell as to the commercial viability of this product. With a non-stimulated half-life of 1.7 billion years, it would appear that that the K40 solution under development by Betavoltaic is the 'perfect' process for liberating energy in a controlled manner from the breakdown of this material.

Whether the PlasmaVolt devices that generate the K40 isotope can penetrate the market enough to successfully launch the large-scale generation of this isotope remains to be seen, but the Betavoltaic Corporation is doing excellent work both in the short- and long-term planning for commercialization of this technology. They've succeeded admirably in the first step towards commercialization, which is demonstrating that the PlasmaVolt can generate power and create the K40 isotope -- the next step requires demonstrating that the K40 can actually power a Betavoltaic cell.

Once Betavoltaic makes it work, they'll be holding the key to an entirely new energy technology that has the potential to revolutionize our world through an inexpensive and efficient method of creating and storing electrical energy.

References

Betavoltaic Industries, http://www.betavoltaic.com

United Nuclear, http://www.unitednuclear.com

Pons & Fleischman Cold Fusion,
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_fusion

Dr. Ruggero Santilli, http://www.i-b-r.org/santilli.htm

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: notes from Linden, Switzerland
« Reply #30 on: February 16, 2008, 02:28:03 AM »

Offline EMdevices

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Re: notes from Linden, Switzerland
« Reply #31 on: February 16, 2008, 02:53:19 AM »
thanks for that info Stefan,   

so that particular model was a fake?   I never knew that.  :-\

EM 

Offline hartiberlin

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Re: notes from Linden, Switzerland
« Reply #32 on: February 16, 2008, 02:59:43 AM »
If somebody wants to begin experimenting with pulsing
radioactive rocks inside a LeydenJar,
maybe you could start with these samples:

http://www.unitednuclear.com/low.htm

These are just 15 US$ each and
maybe it would be a start to see, what power
could be got out of them, if one excites them with High Voltage
pulse inside a Layden Jar capacitor.

Be sure to put a lead shield around the aparatus and use
a Geiger counter to see, if the radiation level will increase.

Regards, Stefan.

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Re: notes from Linden, Switzerland
« Reply #32 on: February 16, 2008, 02:59:43 AM »
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Offline hartiberlin

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Re: notes from Linden, Switzerland
« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2008, 06:32:04 AM »
I just studied the Kalium 40 isotop a bit more and found out,
where to get it from.

One German page told me:

Pottasche ist Kaliumcarbonat, der Kaliumanteil ist in der Hauptsache f?r die emittierte Kernstrahlung verantwortlich, genauer ist es der Anteil von K-40, einem Beta-Strahler. Neben der Beta-Strahlung ist die Aktivit?t von K-40 auf den K-Einfang und der Emission einer charakteristischen Gammastrahlung zur?ckzuf?hren. Kalium ist ein primordiales Nuklid, das es seit der Entstehung der Erde gibt. K-40 hat eine Halbwertszeit von 1,28 Mrd. Jahren (=1,28 Ga) und ist im nat?rlichen Kalium zu 0,0117% vorhanden. Ein P?ckchen Pottasche von 15 g Inhalt bringt ca. 450 CPM

So PottassiumCarbonat seems to be a good source to contain also K40 isotopes of Kalium,
which is the perfect Beta-decay material.
It is said that a pack og 15 gramms K2CO3 has a radioactive Beta-Decay of 450 counts per minutes.
So with High Voltage Excitation you could enhance this very much.

Also K40 is inside Glimmer and as you can see, in the Testatika demo cell,
which was shown to Hanz Holzherr and his group
and also between the horseshoe magnets we see some transparent quarz like
plates, which surely could be Glimmer plates containing a lot of K40 isotopes.

Has anybody yet tried to pulse Glimmer plates with High Voltage burst pulses ?
What does it do ?

Maybe you need the mesh metal as the cap plates, so the Gamma-Decay goes through it
and does not discharge the Beta-Decay charge from the mesh capacitor plates ?

Sounds all pretty logical, if you think more about it and know, that it is an excited
radioactive process.

Regards, Stefan.

Offline f_dyne

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Re: notes from Linden, Switzerland
« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2008, 06:23:04 PM »


This was a nice fake a few years ago from Italy, when I remember correctly...
;) ;D
You really have to pulse the moutain crystalls with high voltage pulses
or corona discharge RF bursts to get the excited Beta Decay.

Hi Stefan and you all,

I don't know if you have seen my (complete) theory on Testatika.
I demostrated that Testatika power can be generated through electromagnetic devices means only.
Energy should come from air electrostatic energy, an indirect sun powered source.
I have to test it well yet, but I just made some succesful partial experiments.
The theory seems quite easy at first but it is really a bit difficult to grasp, it seems.
Please ask, if you are interested but you don't understand immediately.

http://utenti.lycos.it/fischerconsulting/testatpu.html

F_dyne

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Re: notes from Linden, Switzerland
« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2008, 06:23:04 PM »
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Offline f_dyne

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Re: notes from Linden, Switzerland
« Reply #35 on: February 16, 2008, 06:23:23 PM »


This was a nice fake a few years ago from Italy, when I remember correctly...
;) ;D
You really have to pulse the moutain crystalls with high voltage pulses
or corona discharge RF bursts to get the excited Beta Decay.

Hi Stefan and you all,

I don't know if you have seen my (complete) theory on Testatika.
I demostrated that Testatika power can be generated through electromagnetic devices means only.
Energy should come from air electrostatic energy, an indirect sun powered source.
I have to test it well yet, but I just made some succesful partial experiments.
The theory seems quite easy at first but it is really a bit difficult to grasp, it seems.
Please ask, if you are interested but you don't understand immediately.

http://utenti.lycos.it/fischerconsulting/testatpu.html

F_dyne

 

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