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(December 19, 2006, 11:27:19 PM)
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Author Topic: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University  (Read 11819 times)

Offline hansvonlieven

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Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« on: December 20, 2007, 08:10:24 PM »
G'day all,

This has just wound up on my desk. Very Interesting

http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2008/january9/nanowire-010908.html

Hans von Lieven

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline Megla

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2007, 12:43:42 AM »
It's very interesting.
Did you know that magnetism is only EM oscilation. Because the frequency of magnetism is so high it's look like field. In the case that we have very small antenna then it's possible that we catch this wawe. If we put the net of tiny antennas before strong magnet...     This is battery.



Offline hansvonlieven

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2007, 12:58:54 AM »
It's very interesting.
Did you know that magnetism is only EM oscilation. Because the frequency of magnetism is so high it's look like field. In the case that we have very small antenna then it's possible that we catch this wawe. If we put the net of tiny antennas before strong magnet...     This is battery.

No Megla,

I don't know that, neither does anyone else. This is just a fancy speculation that has never been proven. It is highly unlikely.

Hans von Lieven

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2007, 12:58:54 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2007, 01:43:38 AM »
Hans:

This appears to be a great advance in the technology of these types of batteries.  By virtually eliminating the fracturing problem by using the nanowires who can say where this might lead?  Thanks for posting it.

Bill

Offline powercat

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2008, 10:25:56 PM »
nanowire manufacturer
Advanced Battery Materials
http://www.predmaterials.com/en_batt/graphite_carbon_nano.html

pc

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2008, 10:25:56 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline FreeEnergy

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2008, 10:41:09 PM »
It's very interesting.
Did you know that magnetism is only EM oscilation. Because the frequency of magnetism is so high it's look like field. In the case that we have very small antenna then it's possible that we catch this wawe. If we put the net of tiny antennas before strong magnet...     This is battery.




you mean something like this? http://www.metacafe.com/watch/665396/how_increase_speed_of_electric_motor/
but only use an antenna as the load?

i could be wrong, or not.

-edit-
it could also possibly work with a crystal radio :) http://www.overunity.com/index.php/topic,3788.0.html

Offline FreeEnergy

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Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2008, 11:07:46 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline Localjoe

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2008, 07:04:15 PM »
@Freeenergy

You just gave me a novel idea to try .. Good deal

Im going to make a small electromagnet , a small feild coil and mount a magent stationary put the head of the electromagnet like an inch away skrew that thing in something solid so there bothheld in place then place a small air core field coil in between them the magnet and the electromagnet try to center the two in the circle and hang the feild coil in mid air..

Would a larger disturbance be created in the field coil with and without the magnet.. could be a simple ou test.. Ive got a bit of bismuth left here too and i want to say it  has reflective properties from my experiences with it.. what i wouldn't give for someone to mold me a barrel for my coil gun out of bismuth.
                                                                                                 Joe

Offline capthook

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2008, 08:54:59 PM »
Cool stuff!  Huge strides in battery tech lately.  Carbon nano-tubes offer enormous potential IMO.
I want a practical/affordable/range extended/convenient Electric Vehicle (EV) TODAY! (asking too much LOL)

Have you seen the batteries developed by Altairnano?

http://www.altairnano.com/

Battery characteristics:

1) Fast charges times: 6 min. full recharge using high-capacity charger (making a recharge comparable to filling gas tank)
1) Higher energy density:  3x
2) Fast Discharge rates
3) Long life-cycle: up to 20x standard Li-Ion (20,000 cycles)
4) Safety: reduced/eliminated thermal runaway

Drawback:  Cost.  Limited production of new technology results in excess of $40,000 for an EV application

With mass production reducing costs - this could be the technology needed to make EV's practical.


Hydrogen is NOT the answer as the losses converting say water to hydrogen and then H2 back to electricity are a HUGE waste compared to storing in a battery.

A battery will discharge to an electric motor 90% of the electricity used to charge it. If that same electricity were used to electrolyse hydrogen, at least 30% of the energy would be lost, and if that hydrogen were then ran through an on-board fuel cell to power an electric motor, another 40% of the energy would be lost. That is, if you put 100 kilowatt-hours into a battery, you?ll get 90 kilowatt-hours back to power your motor. If on the other hand, you put 100 kilowatt-hours into electrolysing hydrogen, then in-turn convert that hydrogen back into electricity to power your motor, you will only have 42 kilowatt-hours available from your original 100. For storing electricity, a battery is more than twice as efficient as a fuel cell.

- - - -

"The results of these tests have indicated that batteries constructed using Altair's nano-lithium titanate electrode materials could have the following characteristics:
-- Very fast charge rates - currently measured at six minutes to a full
charge. In the power tools market this is a major breakthrough compared to
the current two to four hours. And in the electric vehicle (EV) market this
would allow a recharge in the same amount of time as it currently takes to
fill a car with gasoline.  Rapid charge rates would provide a significant
performance improvement for current EV designs, which presently take
several hours to charge and make them only practical for short haul trips.

-- Fast discharge potential - required when high amounts of power are
needed by power tools and electric or hybrid vehicles. An Altair scientist
commented that an EV powered by batteries using Altair's electrode
materials would have a 0-60mph speed that would leave other EVs in the
dust!!

-- Extremely long cycle life - Reported by Rutgers at 9,000 cycles and
estimated at 20,000 plus charge/discharge cycles. This compares with less
than 1,000 for all other types of rechargeable batteries. Using Altair's
electrode materials, this would allow lifetime rechargeable batteries. In
power tool applications, as well as providing a cost benefit, it also has a
substantial environmental impact because it would significantly reduce the
toxic hazards from discarded batteries. In EVs, it significantly improves
the cost of ownership because the batteries would not need to be replaced
during the typical life of the vehicle and in fact could be transferred to
a replacement vehicle.

-- Safe design - Because of the electrical characteristics of the Altair
electrode materials they are operating at a level that avoids the explosive
potential inherent with current Li Ion batteries.
This will enable large configuration batteries to be constructed required in EVs or telecom switching centers. As well as solving a major safety problem, it also will reduce the cost of battery manufacture because the safety mechanisms included in current Li Ion batteries to mitigate explosions will likely be minimized.
)--Feb 10, 2005 -- Altair Nanotechnologies, Inc. (NasdaqSC:ALTI - News) announced today that it has achieved a breakthrough in Lithium Ion battery electrode materials, which will enable a new generation of rechargeable battery to be introduced into the marketplace, as well as create new markets for rechargeable batteries. These new materials allow rechargeable batteries to be manufactured that have three times the power of existing Lithium Ion batteries at the same price and with recharge times measured in a few minutes rather than hours"



Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2008, 08:54:59 PM »
3D Solar Panels

Offline powercat

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2008, 09:12:59 PM »
@Freeenergy

You just gave me a novel idea to try .. Good deal

Im going to make a small electromagnet , a small feild coil and mount a magent stationary put the head of the electromagnet like an inch away skrew that thing in something solid so there bothheld in place then place a small air core field coil in between them the magnet and the electromagnet try to center the two in the circle and hang the feild coil in mid air..

Would a larger disturbance be created in the field coil with and without the magnet.. could be a simple ou test.. Ive got a bit of bismuth left here too and i want to say it  has reflective properties from my experiences with it.. what i wouldn't give for someone to mold me a barrel for my coil gun out of bismuth.
                                                                                                 Joe
hi joe
this may help  bismuth manufacturers, http://www.himanufacturers.com/sou-2-bismuth-0-0.html

pc

Offline FreeEnergy

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2008, 09:21:24 PM »
also might work with an earth battery system.  :) http://www.overunity.com/index.php/topic,3500.0.html

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2008, 09:21:24 PM »
3D Solar Panels

Offline Koen1

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2008, 01:59:53 PM »
Ive got a bit of bismuth left here too and i want to say it  has reflective properties from my experiences with it.. what i wouldn't give for someone to mold me a barrel for my coil gun out of bismuth.

Erm, didn't Bismuth show those magnetic field reflection characteristics
only when cooled with liquid nitrogen, and only because at that temp
it becomes superconducting?
Any superconductor will reflect the magnetic field, as far as I know...

Bismuth may be commercially available (more so in the Americas than in the EU it seems),
but you would probably still have to build a liquid nitrogen cooling system around your
Bismuth barrel...
Which is doable of course, but just something you may want to keep in mind?
;)

Offline helmut

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2008, 10:12:13 PM »
@Koen1
I read somewhere,that the privat fishermen take instead of lead Ballast alternative Bismuth as Ballast.
So it could be commercial  available in such a shop .

helmut

Offline rensseak

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2008, 09:46:41 AM »
@Koen1
I read somewhere,that the privat fishermen take instead of lead Ballast alternative Bismuth as Ballast.
So it could be commercial  available in such a shop .

helmut

Hello all

@helmut

schon irre was sich so alles patentieren l??t!

EP000000658305A1

Allerdings ist dieses Bismuth dann nicht so rein.

Gru?
Norbert

Offline Koen1

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Re: Revolutionary Battery developed at Stanford University
« Reply #14 on: March 15, 2008, 02:47:34 AM »
thanks I guess? Idunno what that EP thing is,
but

@Helmut: yes, bismuth is used as non-toxic lead replacement
for ballast/weights/sinkers, and also in shot (for hunting).
But not in all countries, and not in all such shops.
Although if one were to want to use bismuth, one should
remember it has a very high melting point so it is not easy
to melt it into a usefull shape. An alloy may be easier,
such as "Rose's metal", which is an alloy of 50% bismuth,
25% lead and 25% tin, and melts at 100 degrees C (give or take
a few degrees). That's a much more workable temperature,
but I'm not sure how much of the desired reflection effect
will remain when you dilute the bismuth so much...

 

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