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Author Topic: Mechanical force amplifier  (Read 7937 times)

Offline Eddy Currentz

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Mechanical force amplifier
« on: November 12, 2007, 09:39:17 PM »
This is fundamentally a double pendulum and loosely based on Milkovic's machines. The difference is that the weights rotate (360?) together while being 180 degrees out of phase. They are connected together by a chain, which is also connected to a crank on the fulcrum. The movable portion of the machine, and the fulcrum, is offset slightly to the right of the vertical supports.

(http://img100.imageshack.us/img100/3449/flailerwideke7.jpg)

As the crank is turned, the weights rotate synchronously on their axis. The centrifugal force of the weights are balanced in the horizontal plane as the weights are level with each other both pointing to, and away from the fulcrum.
In the vertical plane the weights point in the opposite direction, twice during one revolution. Consequently, oscillating force is generated through the centrifugal force of the weights in two directions and reflected in the vertical arm.
I don?t have a load rigged up yet, but there is plenty of force on the lever when the weights are spun. The weights are only 10 lbs each, but combine for 20 lbs of force in both directions.
I don't consider this mechanism a gravity powered device, although some may see gravity as the activating force. I rather believe that centrifugal force is the active motivator here. This is because the faster the weights are rotated, the more force is generated, which coincides with the increase in centrifugal force.

(http://img100.imageshack.us/img100/1918/flailerrightsprocketmd0.jpg)

Here is the drive mechanism
 (http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/4254/flailercentermechdi0.jpg)

This is where the work will be extracted from. The weight is there now for damping. I plan on extending a rod from here to a water pump.
 (http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/8167/flailerbottomweighthh7.jpg)

Anyway, more to come in the next few weeks. I also hope to make some quantitative measurements once I have things working smoothly.

Ted


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Mechanical force amplifier
« on: November 12, 2007, 09:39:17 PM »

Offline hansvonlieven

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Re: Mechanical force amplifier
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2007, 10:19:11 PM »
G'day Eddy,

Good show. You are correct, this is not a gravity motor, the device relies solely on the centripetal forces that develop in the rotors.

A word of warning, As the revolutions of the weights increase the centripetal forces grow exponentially. If at high speed one of your weights were to come off there could easily be enough power for the weight to go through an eight inch brick wall. The rest of the machine would totally self destroy in such an event caused by the sudden imbalance. Increase your speed with caution and stand well clear. This is a very dangerous piece of equipment as it stands. No-one would like to see you get hurt.

Apart from that, this is a good approach and could very well develop a lot of power with a comparatively small input of energy.

Hans von Lieven

EDIT: Why don't you ask Mr Entropy to give you the maths on the device, he knows what he is talking about and can explain it much better than I could. I am certain he would be glad to help.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2007, 10:56:24 PM by hansvonlieven »

Offline Eddy Currentz

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Re: Mechanical force amplifier
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2007, 11:25:04 PM »
Hey Hans,
No worries about it turning too fast since I'm only cranking it by hand, but safety is always a concern. Everything is bolted down pretty good as it has to withstand a lot of eccentric forces. I may eventually hook up a small motor, but not until I better understand the machine.
I notice you use the term centripetal instead of centrifugal. I understand the prevailing contention that centrifugal force doesn't really exist, but I dispute that notion. I would argue that the centrifugal force is the operative force here since it is away from the axis instead of towards it. Centripetal force is only enabled by the strength of the rod that holds the weight. Centrifugal force is that force which is acting against the weight changing direction, and hence is the force that moves the mechanism.
In a balanced wheel, the centrifugal force is equalized in all directions and not apparent while the wheel is in rotation. This is only because of the physical strength of the wheel holding itself together. At a high enough speed, any wheel will eventually fly apart.
Anyway, I suppose you can look at it both ways. I just see centrifugal force as an added force with a rotating mass. The thing to determine is the amount of work that can be extracted compared to the loss of angular momentum. That's where a motor will be helpful as a means to measure power in to the system. A pump can be rigged up to measure gallons per minute per foot of vertical lift.
At this early stage it feels like there is a lot more force out than energy put into cranking, but that remains to be measured.

Ted

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Mechanical force amplifier
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2007, 11:25:04 PM »
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Offline hansvonlieven

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Re: Mechanical force amplifier
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2007, 11:38:34 PM »
Sorry Ted,

Centripetal force is the correct term here. The centripetal force is the force that develops between the weight and the axis as the weight spins. The word centripetal means towards the center. This is the force you are using. Centrifugal force is when the weight gets disconnected from the axis. It is strictly speaking the equal and opposite force that Newton talks about which is liberated when disconnection occurs. But this is only a way of speaking since the only force present is the centripetal force that when liberated propels the weight tangentially.

Perhaps I am not explaining this very well but this is the way I was taught.

Hans von Lieven

Offline hansvonlieven

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Re: Mechanical force amplifier
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2007, 07:27:58 AM »
Quote
Centripetal force
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A ball tethered to the rotational axis. The centripetal force is exerted by the tether on the ball to keep it rotating around the specified path. The centripetal force is what gives the tether its tension.
A ball tethered to the rotational axis. The centripetal force is exerted by the tether on the ball to keep it rotating around the specified path. The centripetal force is what gives the tether its tension.

The centripetal force is the external force required to make a body follow a circular path at constant speed (speed being the magnitude of velocity). The force is directed inward, toward the center of the circle. Hence it is a force requirement, not a particular kind of force. Any force (gravitational, electromagnetic, etc.) can act as a centripetal force. The term centripetal force comes from the Latin words centrum ("center") and petere ("tend towards", "aim at."), and can also be derived from Isaac Newton's original definitions described in Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica.

The centripetal force always acts perpendicular to the direction of motion of the body. In the case of an object that moves along a circular arc with a changing speed, the net force on the body may be decomposed into a perpendicular component that changes the direction of motion (the centripetal force), and a parallel, or tangential component, that changes the speed.

Hans von Lieven

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Mechanical force amplifier
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2007, 07:27:58 AM »
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Offline Eddy Currentz

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Re: Mechanical force amplifier
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2007, 02:55:07 AM »
Rats, Milkovic beat me to it.  :(  Other than the hammer, it's basically the same machine.

(http://www.rexresearch.com/milkovic/19yu545.jpg)

Offline hansvonlieven

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Re: Mechanical force amplifier
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2007, 04:08:58 AM »
Don't worry about MIlkovic Ted,

Just about everything he says is documented in George Constantinesco's patents from the 1920's. I doubt he knows about them, neither does the Serbian Patent Office.

Hans von Lieven

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Mechanical force amplifier
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2007, 04:08:58 AM »
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Offline Eddy Currentz

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Re: Mechanical force amplifier
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2007, 05:25:31 AM »
George is a god.

 

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