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Author Topic: Single Wire Tests  (Read 73377 times)

Offline hansvonlieven

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #135 on: January 24, 2008, 09:01:03 PM »

BUT... what if, SM discovered that the way to "disable the EFFECTS of the flux, so that now the electrons float freely" was as simple as sending the identical frequencies in opposite directions?  One power source sends them all clockwise and another oscillator and power source (two batteries) sends identical signals counterclockwise?  This would give you the counter rotating fields, and (perhaps, needs more testing) this is how SM disabled the effects of the flux?

Cheers,

Bruce

I think you are on the right track with your thinking Bruce,

Have another look at Mark Snoswell's animation of the behaviour in a bifilar coil  http://www.overunity.com/index.php/topic,2764.90.html

 posts 92, 95 and 96.

As Rosphere has shown there is bifilar behaviour in a single wire with opposing currents. What if you send the same opposing pulses down a bifilar coil? Would the effect be cumulative? Is that how you create the vortex? And what if the bifilar coil was constructed with one iron wire and one copper wire as in the Stubblefield coil? Fascinating questions.

Only experiment will show.

Hans von Lieven

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #135 on: January 24, 2008, 09:01:03 PM »

Offline Freezer

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #136 on: January 24, 2008, 09:21:41 PM »

Offline allcanadian

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #137 on: January 24, 2008, 09:44:24 PM »
I did the crossed current test last night, two batteries with lamps and positive connections cross on the single conductor, this just defies all rational explanation. I have no idea  ??? I mean absolutely nothing comes to mind to explain this ---- good job guys. :)
I tried sending inductive discharges across the current and still ---- Nada, zero interaction ???

Tonight Im going to probe this setup with a compass to see what the hell the B field might be doing, then maybe try Hans setup. This just ain't right-----

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #137 on: January 24, 2008, 09:44:24 PM »
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Offline hansvonlieven

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #138 on: January 24, 2008, 10:05:49 PM »
G'day all,

On this one I need help from you electronics guys. I am only a humble mechanical engineer and though I can read and understand circuit diagrams I don't know enough to design a circuit. What I am trying to do is feed complex pulses (a la Keely) in opposing directions through anything from a single wire to coils to electrodes in an electrolyte to study the effects.

I intend to use my computer as the frequency generator, I have the necessary programmes.

I intend to optically isolate the test rig from the computer using optocouplers. You can see in the attached diagram what I have in mind.

What I need is a circuit that drives the LED's with my audio output. How do I go about this. Any suggestion gratefully received.

Obviously in my proposed setup anything you wish can be connected to the terminals A and B.

Hans von Lieven

Offline BEP

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #139 on: January 24, 2008, 11:30:25 PM »
Info that may be of additional interest:

Replace that 1 wire with a low ohm resistor.
Connect equal resistors across each LED to bring the load up.
If there are amps going through the 1-wire resistor then it would radiate heat, but it doesn't.

If your loads are almost perfectly balanced and both high enough to pronounce the effect you should sense a temperature change in that 1-wire resistor.

I'll not yank your chains on this but balance is the key word here.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #139 on: January 24, 2008, 11:30:25 PM »
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Offline Rosphere

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #140 on: January 24, 2008, 11:48:15 PM »
I replaced the 'wire' and the opposite LED glowed brighter.  I repeated this several times and it happened every time.

When the unexpected LED was brighter did you see if that magnetic field was weaker or gone?

If there is current flow there must be a magnetic field, right?


Sorry, BEP, I used a small compass to detect the magnetic fields in a similar experiment with no LEDs.  When the LED's were in use my small compass would not budge either way.  I suspect that the current was too weak after passing through the LED's.   :(

Offline armagdn03

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #141 on: January 24, 2008, 11:53:02 PM »
Erfinder once said: "Study comes first and then construction! How can you build what you don't understand?".

I was going back through Steven Marks statements and the following got me thinking again. No one has a definitive answer for what the kick is.

SM: I told you that the simplest form of over unity is a piece of wire and a voltage source. Anyone can actually connect it and measure. See for yourself the kick. NO coil no xmrs, just a kick. That should tell you learned gentleman that there exists a form of energy convertible and useable which is directly related to a simple piece of wire and instantaneous electron flow.

The following is my effort to understand the kick using a straight piece of wire.


A possible solution to the kick.

Multiplication of power = multiplication of motion = high voltage.

All circuits contain both induction and capacitance. even a straight wire.  When power is first applied, maximum resistance is found in high induction circuits, which still have some capacitance. The capacitance absorbs the current, and expels it back into the inductance. the first action is energy stuffed into an extreemly small capacitance. Tesla followers should note this. Notice that the kick, is "electrostatic" in nature according to everybodies observations. Think about this, and you will know exactly what the kick is. Also, one might try to apply Bernulli's principle to this problem (really weird I know, but after all this is fluid dynamics at its best.), the higher the inductance, the higher the kick.....why? what does high inductance represent in the face of change?

Also, why has nobody taken a look at the force between charges recently? force decreases with the square of the distance, what doe this imply? A linear increase in voltage = a non linear, (squared) function??? HELLO!!!

Avramenko, Tesla, Frolov = one wire = super conduction at room temp.

this one is gold: EMF reproduces itself through induction, and dissipates itself through condution. How can we induct power instead of conducting it?

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #141 on: January 24, 2008, 11:53:02 PM »
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Offline BEP

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #142 on: January 24, 2008, 11:55:48 PM »

Sorry, BEP, I used a small compass to detect the magnetic fields in a similar experiment with no LEDs.  When the LED's were in use my small compass would not budge either way.  I suspect that the current was too weak after passing through the LED's.   :(

I should have assumed that. Sorry. Yes the LEDs would not provide enough current and mag field to deflect a compass.
If you have enough battery power left you could up the amps with additional resistors and probably make a detectable mag field. I would try each lamp circuit separate first then have both on and check.

Offline jeanna

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #143 on: January 24, 2008, 11:57:01 PM »
Hello All,
I don't know where else to post this so here it is.

I replicated Marco's 1st experiment a and b .

I used 2 batteries each made up of 2 AAA NiMH batteries recently recharged (around 2.65vdc each ) The lights I used were red LED's.

I burned out a LED very quickly last night so began again more cautiously today.
Part a was easy after I got the new led ready. Very quickly I checked it all out and both lights went on but they were flickery. (The flickery part could be because the contacts were made using twisted wires and clips) I checked the voltage in the middle section (the part with the ?) and got 0.010-0.012vdc (Each battery by itself looked about right but I forgot to record it - sorry)

Part b When the thing was full on the voltage from end to end was 0.010vdc-0.012vdc just like the middle section of the a part. Each battery and its loop showed voltage of 0.234vdc. The batteries got really hot really fast so I pulled the batteries off. Then I rechecked the batteries separately and each battery is exactly 2.61vdc. (I didn't think to record what each battery was before the test see above-sorry. )

jeanna

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #143 on: January 24, 2008, 11:57:01 PM »
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Offline BEP

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #144 on: January 25, 2008, 12:07:48 AM »
@Jeanna

If the circuit was right then the polarity of one of your battery sets was wrong. It sounds like each battery was trying to eat the other's tail  :)

LEDs typically don't like voltages as high as 2.6. You'll have to look at the package they came in for their voltages. Usually you must add a resistor in series.

Offline jeanna

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #145 on: January 25, 2008, 12:45:04 AM »
@Jeanna

If the circuit was right then the polarity of one of your battery sets was wrong. It sounds like each battery was trying to eat the other's tail  :)

LEDs typically don't like voltages as high as 2.6. You'll have to look at the package they came in for their voltages. Usually you must add a resistor in series.
Thanks, BEP
This is from Rosphere's post the pic is called firstexperiment-bjpeg maybe on page 8 or 9 where the batteries are mirror to each other but the ends of each battery driven circuit is out on the ends of that straight wire. I think the heat in the batteries (very hot) might be coming from too quickly "recharging" the battery or maybe just like a shorted battery.- except the voltage didn't drain out.

I was avoiding using a resistor only because SM said that some kind of resistor screwed up the works, so I took my chances (If I hadn't JUST recharged them they would have been  been OK.)

This single wire deal is such an interesting thing.

jeanna

This is YOUR description of it:
Quote
Put a black from bat A along with a red from bat B together on one end and reverse on the other (with the loads connected).
The current from both bats is flowing the full length of the wire but opposite directions. If the wire explodes at 1.5 amps and each load is drawing 1 amp then why doesn't the wire explode? Better yet why does no current show at all in the middle?

I just did it and registered the voltages at those various points.
The wire didn't get as hot as the battery. I checked after my hand got burned. The wire wasn't hot (yet).

« Last Edit: January 25, 2008, 01:26:57 AM by jeanna »

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #145 on: January 25, 2008, 12:45:04 AM »
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Offline eldarion

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #146 on: January 25, 2008, 01:22:50 AM »
OK, I hate to spoil everyone's fun, but can someone who has run one of these tests cut the single wire in the middle?  I suspect that it will make no difference in the load LED brightness or resistor amperage; there is another DC path that does not include the wire.

That being said, I still have no explanation for Bruce's odd effects with the pulsed single wire tests.  (Actually, I do have an idea, but still need to test it, as well as confirming Bruce's results in the first place)

Thanks!

Eldarion

Offline jeanna

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #147 on: January 25, 2008, 01:44:36 AM »
OK, I hate to spoil everyone's fun, but can someone who has run one of these tests cut the single wire in the middle?  I suspect that it will make no difference in the load LED brightness or resistor amperage; there is another DC path that does not include the wire.

Thanks!

Eldarion
I probably blew another fuse. I get zero amps, but

the voltage on this circuit is:

 + to - 2.38vdc one way and
 2.43vdc the other and
 + to + 0.01vdc and
 - to - 0.00vdc

hmm

jeanna
now to find a fuse???

Offline Bruce_TPU

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #148 on: January 25, 2008, 03:29:30 AM »
OK, I hate to spoil everyone's fun, but can someone who has run one of these tests cut the single wire in the middle?  I suspect that it will make no difference in the load LED brightness or resistor amperage; there is another DC path that does not include the wire.

That being said, I still have no explanation for Bruce's odd effects with the pulsed single wire tests.  (Actually, I do have an idea, but still need to test it, as well as confirming Bruce's results in the first place)

Thanks!

Eldarion

Hi Eldarion,

If you could confirm Rosphere's experiment as well.  The question in my mind is this, "Does sending like signals, different power sources, disable the flux or make it stronger?"

"If those two identical signals/different sources are out of phase 90 degrees, what does this do with respect to the flux, etc.?  What about 120 degrees out of phase?" 

I am sure you will see something.

@ Marco
The suspense is getting to me.  So what did you see when you tested opposing signals/different sources in your coil?  I want to ask you, since no one else has.  Also thanks for again bringing this to the forefront. 

Cheers,

Bruce

Offline allcanadian

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Re: Single Wire Tests
« Reply #149 on: January 25, 2008, 04:54:47 PM »
LOL :D
Cut the wire in the middle ---- it's a series connection between the two batteries

 

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