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Author Topic: Nathan Stubblefield Earth battery/Self Generating Induction Coil Replications  (Read 1294604 times)

Offline tgraca

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Earth Battery System - Initial Planning
« Reply #4035 on: December 28, 2014, 05:40:09 PM »
So, I ran a quick test on materials to determine which ones to work with, which I included in this video.
http://youtu.be/T_SlWrkbc_g

I just stopped into the local hardware store in invested another $3.09 into large bolts of various materials.
It seems aluminum and copper is my best bet. I did find some 1/4" copper pipe for $0.99/foot which
might be a better solution than copper pipe. It costs a bit less than the 1/2" diameter pipe per foot and
I can "wrap" it into a coil. I would have to drive about 60 miles round trip to pick up the copper ground
wire, so I am leaning toward this now.

Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. Here's the first draft of what I have in mind. I am
thinking in terms of 30 earth batteries in series to get 18 volts. I will probably have to run 3-4 rows of
these batteries to make them fit my back yard. That's about 300 feet of insulated copper wire to
connect the rows (pos to neg per row) and about 300' of un-insulated aluminum to connect the earth
batteries (pos to neg per battery), plus the metal in the earth batteries.

I have a few months to plan and do the initial tests and plan to run some 1, 2 and 3 cell tests initially
before I make that kind of commitment. I would like to get at least 1 amp per battery to create 18 watts
(18 volts times 1 amp), but I may need a large design per earth battery.

Again, I look forward to any comments and suggestions as I read through this thread.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2014, 08:38:56 PM by tgraca »

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Earth Battery System - Initial Planning
« Reply #4035 on: December 28, 2014, 05:40:09 PM »

Offline tgraca

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Earth battery cost analysis
« Reply #4036 on: December 28, 2014, 09:00:55 PM »
Earth battery cost analysis: I can get a pallet of solar panels delivered for $1,500, which (with an average
of 8 hours per day) equates to 28,000 watt hours per day, or 28 kWh per day. The disadvantage of solar
panels is that they are above ground, have to be mounted in some way (mount costs) and may occasionally
have to be cleaned, maintained, or snow shoveled off the panels. I always recommend a back yard
installation if possible, but that still takes up A LOT of space and is ugly in my opinion and at least hard to
incorporate elegantly into your backyard space. It takes significant landscaping skills and is expensive to
make the panels look at least ok and much more to make them look really cool. Making basic mounts out
of treated wood would cost at least $500 in materials, so lets round it to $2,000 for 28 kWh per day, or
~ $0.07 per watt hour per day.

If I can meet my goal of 18 volts at 1 amp, that's 18 watt hours, but this is 24 hours per day, which equates
to 432 watt hours per day (24 hours times 18 watts). Based on the the material costs, I am anticipating the
cost per 30 earth battery system to be about $52, or $0.12 per watt hour.

So, at best, it's more expensive, but has the advantages mentioned (everything is underground / it's
unobtrusive), plus there is a lower investment to get started (about $80 versus $1,500).

Issue... can I really get 18 watts per 30 earth batteries? If less, then that increases the cost per watt hour.

Your thoughts?


Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Earth Battery System - Initial Planning
« Reply #4037 on: December 28, 2014, 09:43:54 PM »
I just stopped into the local hardware store in invested another $3.09 into large bolts of various materials.
It seems aluminum and copper is my best bet. I did find some 1/4" copper pipe for $0.99/foot which
might be a better solution than copper pipe. It costs a bit less than the 1/2" diameter pipe per foot and
I can "wrap" it into a coil. I would have to drive about 60 miles round trip to pick up the copper ground
wire, so I am leaning toward this now.

Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. Here's the first draft of what I have in mind. I am
thinking in terms of 30 earth batteries in series to get 18 volts. I will probably have to run 3-4 rows of
these batteries to make them fit my back yard. That's about 300 feet of insulated copper wire to
connect the rows (pos to neg per row) and about 300' of un-insulated aluminum to connect the earth
batteries (pos to neg per battery), plus the metal in the earth batteries.

I have a few months to plan and do the initial tests and plan to run some 1, 2 and 3 cell tests initially
before I make that kind of commitment. I would like to get at least 1 amp per battery to create 18 watts
(18 volts times 1 amp), but I may need a large design per earth battery.

Again, I look forward to any comments and suggestions as I read through this thread.

I had tried several years ago to wire up my eb in series with no success.  It was explained to me (waaay back in this topic) that I would not be able to do so as
my electrodes all shared the same electrolyte. (The earth)

I have seen videos where folks work around this by using dirt in containers sitting on their deck and thereby they are isolated, but I am not sure that this would really be an earth battery then.  My guess is that if they did a scope shot of that arrangement, there would be no large spikes seen.  Also, I believe they would see degradation of their cathodes.

Bill

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Earth Battery System - Initial Planning
« Reply #4037 on: December 28, 2014, 09:43:54 PM »
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Offline tgraca

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Re: Earth Battery System - Initial Planning
« Reply #4038 on: December 28, 2014, 10:07:35 PM »
I had tried several years ago to wire up my eb in series with no success.  It was explained to me (waaay back in this topic) that I would not be able to do so as my electrodes all shared the same electrolyte. (The earth)
Although I haven't "seen" this done on YouTube or anywhere else, I have interviewed an inventor that has
moved his free energy device to Asia (because the US harassed him - he will sell everywhere but the US),
and he said he had done this successfully. He said the electrodes need to be at least 10' apart for this to work.

His system is 4 posts in a square, each with a 6-filer with 5 leads attached to the ground per 6-filer,
12 wraps above ground for each of the posts (120' per ground), and somehow he gets 6 circuits out of this...
I never understood how to do this, but I am a month overdue for another phone call, so maybe I can get
this clarified. I have done several drawings, but I can not visually reconcile 6 circuits with 4 grounds and
4 six-filars. I just left him a message. Hopefully he will get back with me this week and clarify this.

Anyway...  I will test this 10' idea soon.

Offline tgraca

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Earth Battery System Power And Series Tests
« Reply #4039 on: December 30, 2014, 09:03:32 PM »
Although I haven't "seen" this done on YouTube or anywhere else, I have heard the electrodes need to be at least 10' apart for this to work.
Anyway...  I will test this 10' idea soon.
So here's the test... also, I have tested the power of 2 cells with 2' of copper pipe 1/2" diameter.

http://youtu.be/ddogZ9EOLsk

I will have to think about where to go from here. One thing for sure, I can get much more power from crystal batteries for 1/20th the
cost of materials and they work in series.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Earth Battery System Power And Series Tests
« Reply #4039 on: December 30, 2014, 09:03:32 PM »
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Offline electricme

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@ tgraca
Just popping in here after a long abstance (I usually been in the Stubblefield and Joulthief forums) , was intereresting to read up on your solar remarks, if you are going in that direction the lowest voltage I reccomend is 24 volts (or higher). wish Stephan would put a spell checker in this web site, I have ADHD.


I once made a huge earth battery, way back in the threads somewhere, (Pirate would know where, hi Bill), I also discovered like Bill, the cells need to be insulated from each other, I used copper pipe  and the center electrode was galvanised nails, all cells connected in series, in a stright line, took the output into the house and could light up a bedroom with a white LED.
Ended up blowing the LED when I connected too many cells LOL, (had about 60 cells) I mucked around with connecting cells in strings of Series and Parallel.
Could charge up capacitors, even a super capacitor and was able to use useful voltage but a flood wyped out the experiment in Christmas of 2010 but it was interresting at the time.


I would be interrested in this set of 4 cells set out in a square that you know of, just draw a "plan" of the setup like you would be looking down at the cells, showing how they are connected


You could try this experiment, setup a sensitive moving coil meter, connect wires to the back of it, connect the other ends of the wires to a steel post in the ground, then connect the other wire to another steel rod, then place the meter where you can watch it.
Next take just ONE rod and start to move it backwards and forwards in the ground, slowely moving it backwards and forwards, the meter needle will begin to snap backwards and forwards too.
There is NO battery in the circuit, so where is the energy coming from to move the needle in the meter? is it friction or earth energy?
I have done this experiment many times, it does work. ;)


Keep up the good work

Offline tgraca

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It's doesn't take much aluminum and copper to produce enough power to my simplified JT circuit,
which powers an LED as brightly as a cheap $1 yard light.

These could be made so the metals are at the bottom of the pointed end of the yard light.
 - Of course, the metals can not be touching or it shorts the earth battery.

The key advantage is that there is no solar panel or battery. It also runs 24/7.

I welcome anyone to take this technology and have it mass produced.

I would like to find these in the $1 store instead of the ones I use.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

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Offline the_big_m_in_ok

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Re: Earth Battery System - Initial Planning
« Reply #4042 on: January 14, 2016, 03:32:18 AM »


Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. Here's the first draft of what I have in mind. I am
thinking in terms of 30 earth batteries in series to get 18 volts.


      When I lived on the streets in Oklahoma City, I built a similar system that was even simpler:
A spliced, copper 2-conductor with garbage-found, heavy aluminum strapping wire from a commercial palleted shipment amongst more pallets in a vacant field.   Supports were rebar lengths beaten into the ground and then having aluminum wires as alternating support:
       Fe---Al---Fe---Al---Fe---Al---
The return wire was the intact half of the 2-conductor in one single piece that was connected to a copper pipe, pounded into the dry ground about 6", as my earth ground.   I got 1/2 volt immediately from my Radio Shack multi-meter, and after 2 hrs., it rose to 2 volts.
       I found a place to live shortly thereafter, so I never returned to that lot.  The system was successful, however.   I just didn't have the time to develop it further.


--Lee
 

Offline triffid

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test

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline triffid

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Re: Nathan Stubblefield Earth battery/Self Generating Induction Coil Replications
« Reply #4044 on: February 22, 2018, 03:17:29 PM »
Just when I thought it couldn't get worst I find this news:
Two companies are currently engaged in the late stages of commencing to mine seafloor massive sulfides. Nautilus Minerals is in the advanced stages of commencing extraction from its Solwarra deposit, in the Bismarck Archipelago, and Neptune Minerals is at an earlier stage with its Rumble II West deposit, located on the Kermadec Arc, near the Kermadec Islands. Both companies are proposing using modified existing technology. Nautilus Minerals, in partnership with Placer Dome (now part of Barrick Gold), succeeded in 2006 in returning over 10 metric tons of mined SMS to the surface using modified drum cutters mounted on an ROV, a world first.[56] Neptune Minerals in 2007 succeeded in recovering SMS sediment samples using a modified oil industry suction pump mounted on an ROV, also a world first.[57][/color][/font][/size]
[/color][/font][/size]
Potential seafloor mining has environmental impacts including dust plumes from mining machinery affecting filter-feeding organisms,[53] collapsing or reopening vents, methane clathrate release, or even sub-oceanic land slides.[58] A large amount of work is currently being engaged in by both the above-mentioned companies to ensure that potential environmental impacts of seafloor mining are well understood and control measures are implemented, before exploitation commences.[59][/color][/font][/size]
[/color][/font][/size]
Attempts have been made in the past to exploit minerals from the seafloor. The 1960s and 70s saw a great deal of activity (and expenditure) in the recovery of manganese nodules from the abyssal plains, with varying degrees of success. This does demonstrate however that recovery of minerals from the seafloor is possible, and has been possible for some time. Interestingly, mining of manganese nodules served as a cover story for the elaborate attempt in 1974 by the CIA to raise the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, using the Glomar Explorer, a ship purpose built for the task by Howard Hughes. The operation was known as Project Azorian, and the cover story of seafloor mining of manganese nodules may have served as the impetus to propel other companies to make the attempt.[/color][/font][/size]

 

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