Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Solid States Devices => solid state devices => Topic started by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 02:00:23 AM

Title: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 02:00:23 AM
http://youtube.com/watch?v=vch5_9T4lo0

this is a circuit i have created, it appears to be over unity

http://youtube.com/watch?v=vch5_9T4lo0

have fun with this.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 02:19:53 AM
Hi,
looks very interesting.


What exactly is your pulse input ?
What frequency and what voltage and what duty cycle ?

What kind of transformer did you use ?
Could you please post a parts list ?
Many thanks.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 02:36:08 AM
the battery was dead so i didn't bother measuring anything, it wouldn't even hardly make a arc.

the 555 timer used a 2a224k cap, that transformer from radioshack is sec 12.6-0-12.6v 2a pri 120v 60 hz, no part number. it is 125 to 24 volt step down transformer.

the capacitor was from a microwave,. it was 1.05 uf, allthough the size is not crucial to get this to resonate.

i am sorry but i dont know the rating of the cap for the timer, only the part number, the size is within the part number. the light was 60 watts 120 volts.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: retrod on October 15, 2007, 03:17:55 AM
Interesting, can you try this with a small battery, like a common 9 volt? Can you then wire the lamp so it stays connected for more then a few seconds and see how long till the little battery exhausts?

RD
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 04:04:10 AM
@Spewing
many thanks for the infos.

Do you have a scope and can measure somehow the frequency your
555 timer puts out ?

What transistor or MOSFET are you using to pulse the transformer ?
Do you use any freewheel diode in parallel with the transformer coil ?

 
Stays the bulb so bright all the time or does
the electrolyte cap at the output discharge fast ?
What is the uF ratingof the output cap and what voltage rating has it ?

What exactly is the DC voltage at the output cap, when the
light bulb is connected ?
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 04:08:46 AM
@Spewing
can you please make a longer video with it and
show us each part of the circuit and let the light bulb longer
connected, so we can see its function better ?
Many thanks in advance.

I wanted to do today already some new experiments,
but had to help a friend something, so when I get some
time tommorow I want to replicate this and the Dr.Stiffler
circuit.

Regards, Stefan.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 04:32:59 AM
i tried it with a new 9 volt battery with no success, the battery is to small and the transformer doesn't hum like it does with the bigger battery.

i don't know what this circuit is doing, thats why i posted it. allthough the battery is gone it still makes the transformer hum, and the battery cant light the light for some unodd reason, hook the circuit to the light and it will light brightly.

i dont know what it is doing, but it is something different.

i figured someone smarter than me would figure it out with spare parts laying around, anyone happen to have a 120 to 24 volt transformer and a way to drive it??

just a small discovery that could be bettered...

this is a possible overunity circuit, but i did not claim that, i will leave it up to you guys.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: IronHead on October 15, 2007, 04:37:38 AM
Just Build It , there is enough info for everyone to get started on this simple circuit.
Thanks for sharing this little experiment "Spewing ..
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 04:55:35 AM
i dont want to cause you people to stop work on this circuit, but my measurements is below, i would like to add before you read them, there is something different even though math say different, why is it that the battery can not light this light and the circuit can???? the output of the circuit is DC, so the dead battery couldn't lite it but the circuit could!!!

now that you understand that something is different, i will post the outputs i made, this circuit is defantily worth looking into, and i stumbled upon this with a clunky 120 to 24 step down transformer, lord knows what the proper transformer and components would do.

here we go
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
volts across the battery is 11.76 volts when the ac light is on, the amps draw from the battery is 2.11 amps


the output is 36.6 volts DC UNDER LIGHT LOAD and 200v DC under no load

the amp pulled by the light is .27DC
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 05:15:30 AM
i
the output is 36.6 volts DC UNDER LIGHT LOAD and 200v DC under no load

the amp pulled by the light is .27DC

Hi,
is this a typo ?
Did you mean 136.6 Volts under load ?

Otherwise just with 36.6 Volts the light would be not so bright....

Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 05:19:51 AM
This is a typical impedance converter.
The bulb will not burn on a 12 Volt battery directly, as the
filament resistance of the bulb is too high, so
it needs higher voltage to start burning, but lower current then.

It is some kind of resonance step charging for the output cap.

Would be good,if you could post the waveform.
Also the output cap would charge faster,
if you use a real brigde rectifier with 4 fast diodes !

Now please again post the voltage at the bulb load
and the current through it.

Was 36.6 Volts a typo ?
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 05:36:09 AM
no typo, my battery is dead, and everytime i use the battery it gets worse and worse, my test station is dieing on me:(

i did not get to test this with a hot battery:(

The light is Bright!
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 06:15:58 AM
Well, we need to see a scopeshot of theoutput waveform.
cause at 36.6Volts the bulb should not be this bright...
Probably it still has spikes in it, which the multimeter
does not register.

At which frequency do you drive this circuit ?

By the way, you should never discharge a lead acid accumulator
below 12.0 Volts, otherwise it is dying.
So never discharge it fully into the deep low voltage to still have a healthy
battery and recharge it, when it crosses the 12.0 Volt marking in open cell voltage,
cause it is then already 80 % discharged.(when I remember correctly)
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 06:19:20 AM

volts across the battery is 11.76 volts when the ac light is on, the amps draw from the battery is 2.11 amps


the output is 36.6 volts DC UNDER LIGHT LOAD and 200v DC under no load

the amp pulled by the light is .27DC

So you are pulling out of the battery about 25Watts,
but at the bulb only having 10 Watts ?

Looked much brighter the bulb than 10 Watts to me.

You need to measure this thing with a scope.

Can you loan a scope from a friend or visit a friend
who has one with your circuit and try again ?

Many thanks.

Regards, Stefan.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 06:47:00 AM
i have a old scope here that has been repaired, the only thing you will see from the scope is the waveform, would you like that?? and it is a 5mhz scope i was told.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 06:58:00 AM
here is some shots
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 07:07:07 AM
Yes, sure the waveform across the output bulb would help much
and also the waveform at the drain of the MOSFET versus
battery ground.

Many thanks in advance,
Please also state, where the groundline is
on the scopeshots and whatthe Volts/div
and millisec/div are set to.

Many thanks.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 07:11:46 AM
Okay, our messages crossed.

Looks like the lastshot you posted is definately
the voltage across the output cap and the ripple
ontop of it is due to the lightbulb putting the load on
the cap, so we see the chargeup ripple from the transformer.


Could you please also show the drain voltage of the MOSFET,
there where it makes contact with the transformer coil.
Any use battery ground as the minuspole for the scope.

Thanks.
Please state also how much volts per unit you have set and
what the timescale is set on the scope.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 07:23:13 AM
THis is driving the Transformer.. under a load
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 07:28:26 AM
looks like a man in the picture, you can see his ear eyes mouth and arm, that is just frekky as hell
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 07:29:58 AM
THis is driving the Transformer.. under a load
Where exactly did you measure this between ?

What is the amplifier setting on the scope and timing setting on the scope ?

Otherwise one can not say much...

Please also measure the voltage across the 24 Volts winding
of the transformer with the scope.
Many thanks.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 07:39:06 AM
see, my scope dont measure, only let s me see waves.   

the voltage going to and comming from the primary transformer is 13.40 AC and 9.86 DC                   

i grounded the oscilloscope to the battery, and hooked to the drain of the mosfet.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 07:51:27 AM
Can you please show the waveform with the scope directly across the
primary 24 Volts winding of the transformer ?

Is it a pure sine wave or does it also have pulses in it ?
Does the transformer make a hum noise when it is driven this way ?

DO you think the frequency is in the 1 Khz to 20 Khz range or only in the 100 Hz to 1 Khz
region or still lower like 50 or 60 Hz ?
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 08:11:31 AM
all of these where taken across the primary coil, the frequency was unchanged on every one of these photos, i did the best i could with what i have.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 03:44:53 PM
Hmm, strange, why does the waveform change so much, when you did not change the frequency or anything else ?
Was it once with outpu bulb and once without it ?
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Paul-R on October 15, 2007, 03:45:07 PM
the capacitor was from a microwave,. it was 1.05 uf, allthough the size is not crucial to get this to resonate.
These capacitors (high voltage) usually have a resistor built into the device and connected across the output connections. Does this matter?
Paul.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 06:06:16 PM
microwave over transformers used pulsed dc, but it is not needed because i think the magnetron is the resistor, i wouldn't bet that the capacitor is discharged when you remove the case, be carefull. the use a secondary resonance where i was using a primary resonance.

the resonance in my circuit depends on the primary coil and not the primary capacitor, my core is soft iron i think, this circuit could be so much better! and the secondary side could resonate with the primary creating even more energy.

the oscilloscope was free to me, i repared it, i get different wave forms when i turn the sweep speed. the oscilloscope is doing a damn good job for its vintage age.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 06:23:09 PM
could you please post the sweep speed to each posted scope shot ? We have to find out the exact frequency which works best and the optimized pulse width.
Is your scope maybe still defective, so it shows different waveforms ?
Many thanks.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 15, 2007, 07:11:24 PM
i don't have a good scope, i think it is somewhat defective, it is old and it was given to me buy a good guy. i don't know anyone in a 50 mile radias that does electronics like i do so i cant borrow one:(

ironhead said he built the circuit, maybee he has an oscilloscope?

surly someone with an oscilloscope could help?

i am working on charging my battery.

BTW< my typing is sloppy this week, forgive me, to tired to correct every typo...
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 15, 2007, 10:59:21 PM
I am going to experiment now with it.
I have many parts here and will try it first with a square wave from my function generator.
Could you please let us know, what pulse generator you used ?
Please document it all some more, so others can also replicate it more easily.
Maybe also do a new video and show all the used parts for better documentation.
Many thanks in advance.
Regards, Stefan.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: IronHead on October 16, 2007, 12:35:15 AM
Spewing  post the pulse circuit diagram you are using.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 16, 2007, 02:22:22 AM
i am not sure about the frequency, maybe someone could check it?

0.0000594 kilohertz = 0.0594 hertz
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Mr.Entropy on October 16, 2007, 02:35:47 AM
Spewing,

Are you serious, or is this thread a mean-spirited joke?
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 16, 2007, 02:50:49 AM
i have not claimed over unity, i seen something about this circuit that was unusual and i wanted to share it. i am not trying to be mean entropy

i did say it appears to be overunity, the battery want light the lite but the circuit will, that is very unusual so that is the reason for this post.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Mr.Entropy on October 16, 2007, 03:28:31 AM
i have not claimed over unity, i seen something about this circuit that was unusual and i wanted to share it. i am not trying to be mean entropy

i did say it appears to be overunity, the battery want light the lite but the circuit will, that is very unusual so that is the reason for this post.

Well, OK, but I don't see how you can do that kind of work without knowing Ohm's law.

The light bulb is a 60W 120V bulb.  That means that if you connect it across 120V, it'll draw 0.5 amps, because P=VI, and 120V * 0.5A = 60W.

From Ohm's law, V=IR, we know that the bulb's impedance 120V / 0.5A = 240 Ohms.  You can check that with your mutimeter.

If you connect that across 12V, it'll draw 12V / 240 Ohms = 0.05A.  Power into the bulb will be 12V * 0.05A = 0.6W, and that's probably not enough to light it.

You measured your own circuit, and saw that it draws 25 watts, which enough to push a fair bit of light out of the bulb.  You use an oscillator and a step-up transformer (a step-down backwards is a step-up) to provide that power at a much higher voltage so that the bulb will draw enough current to light.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 16, 2007, 05:41:54 AM
Thank you for clearing that up for me Mr.Entropy, i have learned a great deal from you, i knew ohms law but i didn't know how power was used, where was you at a few post back?

Thanks man!
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 16, 2007, 10:11:21 AM
Hi  Spewing and ALL,

this is a really strange circuit !

I am using an IRFP250 MOSFET and a regulated 14 Volt
Power supply and pulse the MOSFET with my square pulse
generator on and off.

The + 15 Volts positive side of power supply goes into the
low voltage transformer winding and
back out from the other end of this winding into the
MOSFET Drain and the Source of the MOSFET goes to powersupply
ground.
I have put 2 neon bulbs in series across drain and source, so this
saves the MOSFET from spikes bigger than about 160 Volts.

Now the 2 diodes at the output winding are VERY IMPORTANT !
Without them this is a normal transformer circuit,
but WITH them you get strange effects !
By the way, the big output cap could be scraped, you don?t need it !
This makes thecircuit much saver.

It seems that due to the 2 diodes, the circuit re-induces a spike back to the
input winding into the direction of the MOSFET.
This way, this circuit works up to 100 Khz !
I have as a load GU10 socket halogen lamps, one 20 Watts, one 35 Watts and
one 50 Watts.
The 50 Watts is the brighest, but also draws more input power.

I am using a 220 to 2 x 22 Volt transformer, where I did put the
2 x 22 Volts windings in parallel, so the winding resistance is lower
and I use this then to drive it with the MOSFET.

It really matters, how I connect these 2 coils in parallel to the MOSFET.
If you reverse connect the 2 coils , the effect is not there.
( I don?t mean to connect it, so the 2 x 22 Volts coils coils cancel each other
out, no I mean which coil end goes to the drain ofthe MOSFET !)

This is very important, cause the 2 diodes also only conduct
in one direction and thus it is inmportant in which
direction the primary 2 x22 Volts coils are energized !


Anway, I have about 0.7 amps input at the best setting at around 14Volts
DC input and my best GU10 bulb has about the brightness of around 10 to 15 Watts
I would say.

The amazing thing is, that if you short out the 2 diodes, then the input power
rises and you can only pulse the circuit to a few khz and then the light will
go out.
But if you leave the 2 diodes at the output in front of the incandescent GU10
bulb, you can switch to around 100 Khz and the light will stay on
with the same brightness !
Also the output wave is still a very nice square wave !

How could this be with a 50 Hz iron transformer ?

Well there is this pulse being induced back from the output
to the input and this somehow kills the hysteresis...

I have to study this circuit much more and need to take videos
and pictures, but now I am too tired, as I have worked on it now
for a few hours and have not slept the night...

Okay, try this circuit, it is amazing, could be an overunity
transformer, but I still need to do better measurements
of the input and output power.

Okay so far for now.

Regards, Stefan.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 16, 2007, 10:24:52 AM
P.S. My circuit works better WITHOUT the cap in parallel to the
input coil.
Then there are more bigger spikes and thus the input
power also is lower.

But I must still try to do experiments with a different transformer,
which has a lower impedance in the input coil.
My 2 x 22 Volts coils in parallel still has a too high resistance...


It is amazing to see, that when you short out the 2 diodes at the output
with 2 small cables, that the voltage waveform
at the 2 x 22 Volts input coils is changing dramatically and you will be drawing
more input power.
When you don?t short out the diodes and leave them in the circuit,
the input power will fall and there will be a spike induced back,so the input
current falls due to this back spike, but the bulb does not change its brightness
much lower...so this back induction pulse seems to help the circuit save input power....

Regards, Stefan.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 16, 2007, 10:26:18 AM
can you scribble down what your setup, if i understand you're using 3 transformers?

i used the ac capacitor at the primary of the transformer because it Drops Amps and it also makes the light Brighter. it appears to be resonating.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 16, 2007, 10:50:47 AM
Okay, here the change to your circuit.

Look I have here 2 versions.

It really depends, how you hook up
the primary coil !

When it makes more noise due to
the core vibrating more, then it is the right version !
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 16, 2007, 10:57:17 AM
No,
not 3 transformers.
You can use also just one 22 Volt coil as the primary and the 220 Volt coil
as the secondary.

I have to see, if I will find a better transformer, which has
a high wattage 240 to 6 Volts or so relationship.

This will probably then work much better,cause the 6 Volts coil
has a much lower resistance.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 16, 2007, 11:00:20 AM
P.S. I did not draw in the 2 neon bulbs in series, which are then hooked
across (parallel to) the drain and source.
These are important, when you use no cap parallel with the
coil, cause otherwise you will blow your MOSFET ,especially
at low frequencies !
A freewheel diode parallel to the input coil did not work... !
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 16, 2007, 11:35:18 AM
P.S: I used 2 x P600 diodes.

As these 2 diodes only conduct into one direction,
only during conduction will be a pulse backinduced
into the primary !
This is very important and this way the drag back of a normal
transformer can be overcome ( think of  Lentz law violation...)

I am going to sleep now.
When  I get up in a few hours, I will work further
on this circuit and post pics and videos.

Regards. Stefan.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 16, 2007, 11:37:55 AM
ahh, your saying it matters which end you apply the pulse to..
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 16, 2007, 11:39:03 AM
kewl,, i'm on 56k, cant wait..  :)
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: linda933 on October 16, 2007, 12:27:19 PM
P.S. My circuit works better WITHOUT the cap in parallel to the
input coil.
Then there are more bigger spikes and thus the input
power also is lower.

But I must still try to do experiments with a different transformer,
which has a lower impedance in the input coil.
My 2 x 22 Volts coils in parallel still has a too high resistance...


It is amazing to see, that when you short out the 2 diodes at the output
with 2 small cables, that the voltage waveform
at the 2 x 22 Volts input coils is changing dramatically and you will be drawing
more input power.
When you don?t short out the diodes and leave them in the circuit,
the input power will fall and there will be a spike induced back,so the input
current falls due to this back spike, but the bulb does not change its brightness
much lower...so this back induction pulse seems to help the circuit save input power....

Regards, Stefan.

@Stefan

What you have drawn is a pretty common circuit.  Depending on which way you hook up the primary (low V side), you have either the essentials of a Forward Converter or a Flyback Converter.  When you short the diodes, you have both at once.  Usually, these converters will have an output capacitor and the forward converter usually adds some means to reset the core if a single transistor approach is used but, in essence, you have shown the heart of these basic circuits here.

As you will find in any textbook on switching power supplies, the forward converter is characterized by having its output rectifier(s) conducting forward power while the primary-side switch is on.  The flyback converter is characterized by its output rectifier(s) conducting while the primary-side switch is off.

The two diodes are in series in this particular case and it will not matter whether they are split one on each end of the transformer or just put in series on either side.  They could just as well be a single diode with a high voltage rating.  You would have the same operation and lower overall losses.

I bet your neon protectors never light up when you have the output diode(s) shorted out because, in that mode forward/flyback, the magnetic field always finds a load in the bulb when it is collapsing.  That is why the input waveform looks quite different (less spikey) in that mode, because you have a resistive reflected load for both polarities with the diodes shorted.  The only inductance to provide a spike is the small amount of leakage inductance; the result of slightly less than perfect magnetic coupling in every transformer.

They also probably don't light up when you are in flyback mode, since the collapsing magnetic field finds its current path through the diodes and lamp when the primary is hooked up that way.  Note that you can change between forward mode and flyback mode by either reversing the primary winding polarity or the diode polarities.  Either way gives the same end result. 

In forward mode, there is no means for resetting the core except your neons.  In a one-transistor drive scheme, resetting the core is just another way of saying "allowing the field to collapse through a current path" and it is something that is very important in one-transistor forward converters.  Often, a third winding and catch diode is used, returning the core reset current to the power supply.  In flyback mode, the resetting of the core is inherent, as the collapsing field is what delivers current to the output circuit.

I think all the behaviors you have observed so far are normal, predictable and quite conventional.  You might want to freshen up on your switching power supply basics...the PDF app note file below is interesting and basic...might help you figure out a better way to reset the core and return the power to the input supply...seems like you have an extra winding available...

Also I have added a nice basic PDF on the flyback converter and its topology...

Linda



Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 16, 2007, 10:52:10 PM
Hi Linda,
thanks for the 2 PDF files.

Well, I think, there is still going on something else here.

Otherwise, how could the lamp stay bright all the time
up to around 100 Khz, when I am still using
a old iron transformer only build for 50 Hz ?


I will experiment further starting about in  2 hours from now and
then post a couple of pics and a video later on.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: linda933 on October 17, 2007, 12:22:31 AM
Hi Linda,
thanks for the 2 PDF files.

Well, I think, there is still going on something else here.

Otherwise, how could the lamp stay bright all the time
up to around 100 Khz, when I am still using
a old iron transformer only build for 50 Hz ?


I will experiment further starting about in  2 hours from now and
then post a couple of pics and a video later on.

Old iron cores, especially those with the thinner laminates, have no problem going up to frequencies well above audio.  The limiting factor is usually core losses, but you must realize that you are only putting a few watts through this, so it is probably operating well below any core loss limitations even at 100KHz.  Another frequncy response rolloff mechanism is "leakage inductance" due to finite magnetic coupling coefficients.  This appears as a series inductance to the transformer and can often be compensated with a resonating cap to extend transformer frequency response.

As you increase power throughput, I'd expect two problems:  First would be core saturation because of DC bias.  Unless you add a symmetrical flux resettting method, your forward converter will tend to push its operating point way over to one end of the B/H curve and this brings on early saturation.

The secod problem would be heating of the core due to core losses if you operate at high frequency and high power simultaneously on a physically small core.

Linda 
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 17, 2007, 06:00:10 AM
hey harti, is this your findings? i mean did you make this site?

http://jnaudin.free.fr/html/overtep.htm
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 18, 2007, 04:34:21 AM
hey harti, is this your findings? i mean did you make this site?

http://jnaudin.free.fr/html/overtep.htm

Well, I had the basic idea back then,
but did not have the time to fully check all different setups out.

There was some capacitive coupling via the gate of the Mosfet
where additional power came into the circuit.

Will also try again this circuit soon.
Sorry for not yet providing the videos,
but I am still testing things out and don?t want to rush any
conclusions yet.

Linda is right, that the core can easily go to around 30 to 50 Khz in my case now,
without having any big impact on the output light at this power level
around 20 Watts I am now doing these experiments.
Also have to let it run longer to see, if the iron core
of this big transformer gets anywhere hot.

I still have to test a few more caps with this setup,
but in the moment it looks like this is not overunity
or at least.,what I put in comes out there at the bulb.

The first video user Spewing
posted had a very to light sensitive camera,
probably his mobile phone, so the 60 Watts bulb looked
very bright, but it probably was not in real live.

I also can light up a 25 Watts transparent bulb pretty much,
but I also put in about 14 Volts x 1.3 Amps,
so it is around 18 Watts and the filament looks also like about around a
20 Watts glow.

As user Spewing has already calculated his output at around 36 Volts was lower
than the input power, so I still wonder, if the 60 Watts bulb
still lighted really up as it would be  under a normal 60 Watts bulb at the grid,
or if it was lower and only the videocam overexposed it ?

I also have the effect, that when I don?t connect the lamp, the cap
at the output charges up to around 150 or 200 Volts ( depends on the configuration)
and then when I connect the bulb, it is bright in the first moment and then goes
back to normal glow only.
But I also had used only a 220 uF ( 400 Volts type)
only at the output !
User Spewing,what cap did you use ?

This is pretty dangerous, cause if you accidently touch this
cap the high voltage DC can kill you...
ALso if you accidently short this cap it gives you a real loud
bang !

ALso this is not "Cold" electricity as I once touched accidently
the pulsing output and it gave me a "very nice jolt" !
( Fortunately I did not have the 220 uF cap connected during this ! ;) )

Regards, Stefan.
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: Spewing on October 19, 2007, 07:09:36 AM
The cap is 680UF 200 volts, and it is as bright on the video as it is in person!, i achieved this with a lower frequency.

Thanks Hydrocars
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: hartiberlin on October 19, 2007, 01:57:47 PM
Hmm. did you try to connect the bulb for longer time ? Did the brightness change ?
My cap is only 220 uF, so it does not store so much energy...
Also, what  type of diodes did you use ?
Maybe my P600 diodes are just too slow ?
But I still have some very fast Schottky diodes...
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: 4Tesla on December 01, 2007, 11:28:07 AM
Anyone worked more on this?  It looks like a simple DC to AC inverter (square wave).. Is this what others have concluded?

Thanks,
4Telsa
Title: Re: Appears to be overunity Cicuit
Post by: NerzhDishual on March 31, 2018, 12:39:28 AM


Falstad simulator.
No coment.