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Author Topic: Rotation?  (Read 12350 times)

Offline pauldude000

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Re: Rotation?
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2007, 12:16:42 AM »

*******************
Ideally we want that true rotation because only then do we have a dilation effect that creates potential as viewed by us the fixed observers.

BTW:
Resonance - as it applies to true rotating magnetic fields - has more to do with Entrainment (as referred by physics) than ringing that bell. Instead of ringing a bell it is more like playing a singing bowl (a real one).

And Pauldude000, I don't disagree with anything you said about hammers, accidents and so on. The math needed to figure coil details for rotation generally fits on one legal pad. Maybe I need two pages if I want to make free DC.
*******************

I am trying for longitudinal rotation, but possably slightly different than what discussed. Let me see if I can clearly describe my concept.

First, imagine a collector coil, with four control coils. Imagine a field generated by a pulse from the first control coil as the voltage/amperage peaks. the next control coil in line approaches peak as the field in the previous coil starts to weaken. The field then smoothly transfers from the first coil, to the second.

Repeat this process around the entire section of coils.

What is apparent to the observer is a single field, which is constantly sliding around the circumference of the collector coil. Pole positions of north and south remain constant throughout the process. The control coils might well have to be 0deg, 90deg, 180deg, and 270deg respectively.

There is a practical limit to the speed of such rotation, as the speed at which the controls coils switch will be determined directly by reluctance and frequency. The strength of the field will be determined by the resonance of each control coil to the applied signal. (greater voltage and current) The strength of the useable current should be the overall resonance of the collector coil to the field travelling longitudinally around it.

Paul Andrulis




Offline BEP

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Re: Rotation?
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2007, 04:24:38 AM »
@pauldude000

The description you give is still one of apparent rotation not the movement of one field around the circle. It may be possible to do it in a smoothed motor stator way. I never could. I'm pretty sure the control coils seen on these TPUs are just a means of pushing and boosting the wave that is already in the collector.

The frequency of precession should not care much about the reactive qualities of the coils. Even if it did that frequency should be quite low.

For the first time I am working toward producing a document to aid in creating a rotating field. I WILL be sharing that on this web site after a friend has confirmed it usable and repeatable.

Offline Esa Maunu

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Re: Rotation?
« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2007, 09:48:27 AM »
I agree. When we have a coil that consists of composite material including both magnetostrictive and ferromagnetic particles, those magnetostrictive particles launches an acoustic phonon wave when a magnetic field pulse is created by  control coil. This acoustic phonon wave pulse travels around the toroid and can form high peaks, when pulse frequensies in a control coils are correct. This acoustic phonon pulse is needed to wobble electrons precession in a static external magnetic field in a toroid`s composite ferromagnetic material. When electron precession is wobbling because of the phonon pulse , electron sends an energy packet in a form of photon. This photon wave has a same freguency as electron precession has. Because this photon radiation is typically on a GHz range, it can form also interferencies around the toroid, because it has a short wavelenght that can match on a toroids circumference. Photon radiation is able to give it`s energy to electrons, that occurs on a collector, if first a bias current is used to start electron flow on a collector. If you have more electrons on a collector after startup, so more  energy transfer can happen from photon radiation energy to electrons energy .

http://gamma.ethz.ch/online/esr/vcalc/index.html

Esa


@pauldude000

The description you give is still one of apparent rotation not the movement of one field around the circle. It may be possible to do it in a smoothed motor stator way. I never could. I'm pretty sure the control coils seen on these TPUs are just a means of pushing and boosting the wave that is already in the collector.

The frequency of precession should not care much about the reactive qualities of the coils. Even if it did that frequency should be quite low.

For the first time I am working toward producing a document to aid in creating a rotating field. I WILL be sharing that on this web site after a friend has confirmed it usable and repeatable.

Offline pauldude000

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Re: Rotation?
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2022, 01:32:17 PM »
@pauldude000

The description you give is still one of apparent rotation not the movement of one field around the circle. It may be possible to do it in a smoothed motor stator way. I never could. I'm pretty sure the control coils seen on these TPUs are just a means of pushing and boosting the wave that is already in the collector.

The frequency of precession should not care much about the reactive qualities of the coils. Even if it did that frequency should be quite low.

For the first time I am working toward producing a document to aid in creating a rotating field. I WILL be sharing that on this web site after a friend has confirmed it usable and repeatable.


Please pardon the lateness of the reply. The rotation is indeed apparent, but the device doesn't know that. It is the principle of equivalence applied in practicality. The key to such rotation is considerable in this fashion, and is a matter of critical pulse timing. Coil 1 is activated and reaches full magnetic field strength, then coil 2 fires up and reaches full strength. Coil 3 starts firing up as coil 1 shuts off, etc., etc., etc., down the line until a full rotation is completed, then the process starts over. Firing the coils in this manner doesn't allow the fields to flip, since the field lines are always merged with the field generated by the following coil in line.


I have figured out the TPU. It is a generator that works on the repulsive nature of magnetic fields to electrons. No wires are cut by the rotating magnetic field which is at 180 degrees to the conductor(s) in question, so Lez's law does not apply. It is a miniature type of oddball particle accelerator, in a nutshell. The first law of thermodynamics does not apply as it is anything but a closed system, since it draws free electrons from the environment due to massive amounts of free electron holes produced within the conductor with each pass of the field. Really quite novel and ingenious if you ask me. Simple.


The hard part is getting the timing system functional, which is a complete beast. I have managed to get the rotation of the field a couple of times, but not reliably. Such can also be quite dangerous.