Solid States Devices > solid state devices

Rotation?

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pauldude000:
@Esa

I am not trying to be facetious, but where did that come from?

Whether a field is in motion relative to you, or whether at rest, the field is always moving and never "static" (in the sense of completely devoid of motion), and that is true for both DC and AC.

Even in relation to you, a DC field can move. Consider the magnetic field in a straight wire of great length, with a dc voltage applied. Electrons flow through a conductor at a given speed, which is not c by the way. This applied current requires an amount of time to flow from one end to the other. As this current flows, a linear motional magnetic field is evident. (Magnetic field moves down the length of the conductor at the same speed as the electron flow.)

The only differences between a DC created field and an AC created field, is that the AC field switches polarity with the voltage, and that the AC field varies in strength over time. That is it.

Paul Andrulis   

BEP:
@Esa & Pauldude000

Since this sidebar seems to relate to rotation I'll add to it.

Are we talking transverse or longitudinal?

If transverse then yes voltage travels down the long wire the same no matter what it looks like. However, if it is transverse the current lags and therefore the magnetic field lags.
If longitudinal then the current and voltage are in phase so the magnetic field travels with the voltage.

And no it is certainly not c. T waves have been proven to be slower - as much as a third depending upon the media. L waves are faster than c by about 26%. This is also recently cropping up around the globe by highly qualified sources. Last I looked most of their web sites are still there.

You can create my ideal rotation with either AC or DC but not via transverse. At least I haven't suceeded in the last 30 years. DC always seems to work best as long as it had fast rise time. AC didn't perform well probably because of slow pulse sources, media losses, personal loss of brain cells, etc.

Transverse is fine for jerking rotors around but it does not rotate the field in the stator. The rotation is 'apparent' only. Magnetic fields don't rotate upon their axis. Not normally. At least not in the sense being discussed by most here.

But like a bar magnet we can change the position of the poles. The trick is to not have dead space between one position and the next and make use of the constantly changing gradient moving around the ring as viewed from our relative position (the load connection point).

Ideally we want that true rotation because only then do we have a dilation effect that creates potential as viewed by us the fixed observers.

BTW:
Resonance - as it applies to true rotating magnetic fields - has more to do with Entrainment (as referred by physics) than ringing that bell. Instead of ringing a bell it is more like playing a singing bowl (a real one).

And Pauldude000, I don't disagree with anything you said about hammers, accidents and so on. The math needed to figure coil details for rotation generally fits on one legal pad. Maybe I need two pages if I want to make free DC.

Esa Maunu:
Are you talking about magnetic fields or electromagnetic waves?



--- Quote from: pauldude000 on October 13, 2007, 12:15:52 AM ---@Esa

I am not trying to be facetious, but where did that come from?

Whether a field is in motion relative to you, or whether at rest, the field is always moving and never "static" (in the sense of completely devoid of motion), and that is true for both DC and AC.

Even in relation to you, a DC field can move. Consider the magnetic field in a straight wire of great length, with a dc voltage applied. Electrons flow through a conductor at a given speed, which is not c by the way. This applied current requires an amount of time to flow from one end to the other. As this current flows, a linear motional magnetic field is evident. (Magnetic field moves down the length of the conductor at the same speed as the electron flow.)

The only differences between a DC created field and an AC created field, is that the AC field switches polarity with the voltage, and that the AC field varies in strength over time. That is it.

Paul Andrulis   

--- End quote ---

innovation_station:
hey guys in playing with audiohenge i found this out

rotation is made on it own you can control the dirrection of rotation and speed by changing the freqs it is easy and can be done with all freqs  ;D

so we only need to make 2 freqs in a tpu rotation and 3rd freq are biproducts as soon as the {feedback} or 3rd freq  mixes in our balum it runs on its self and we turn our starters off  {the amps and freq gennys} because it is our feedback that is our output power and it gets amped through the coil after it is started  or right now we are force feeding 3 freqs in to see the effect insted of building and tuneing the tpu to do it on its own

 for the tpu to do its self we need the right amount of windings and freq for our distance to the balum as i understand it

ist

BEP:
@IS

I don't know if you see this by experiment or theory but you are right.

2 Freqs generate the third. Same thing in antenna theory. Some satellite downlinks use this. They have two antennas 90 out from each other and two separate signals (two copies of one). Then a phase shift is introduced between the 2 signals. This creates a helical signal. They can control the pitch and direction of rotation just by adjusting the phase difference between the two signals. The result signal is stronger than the two combined.

This is exactly the problem I am correcting in my travels these past couple of months. Someone decided it couldn't possibly work well this way so they made some adjustments and took the system down. That person is not in the same position now. He didn't care if it worked this way for the past decades. He said it wasn't possible so he changed it. Now my employer is collecting big bucks for me to fix it.
Sorry to say, my pay didn't increase :'(

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