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Author Topic: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler  (Read 1088190 times)

Offline armagdn03

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #90 on: October 17, 2007, 05:05:47 PM »
Nice post, one has to respect a post backed up by numbers.
I did all the math and you are definitely correct in your assessment,
Of the circuit, but I think that something has been missed. I could definitely be wrong on this one, and im sure ill be corrected. But, you cannot just simply stick a 50 ohm resistor across the inputs of the circuit and expect that to solve your impedance matching issues. According to the equations for adding resistances in parallel (counting one resistance as the 50 ohm resistor, and the other as the whole circuit behind it by Theviens Theorem) if you have one low resistance and one extremely high resistance the total resistance will be close to the low resistance, which should be intuitively correct. But I doubt that the resistance of the circuit is very high even with that 10k ohm resistor in place. The resistor is in parallel with the capacitor, and we all know that capacitive reactance is inversely proportional to frequency, and we are driving this set up at high frequency so the electric signal would bypass the 10k resistor. Now there are a lot of inductive elements in the circuit for which the opposite is true, but we would need to know their inductive values to know how many ohms of reactance they have at each frequency.

Basically, what im saying is that the resistive nature of the circuit at each frequency changes, and im not totally convinced that throwing a 50ohm resistor across the inputs will give you accurate enough results to base all of your math on, which by the way was correct, and I wish more people would take the time to work out the numbers! GOOD POST!

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline armagdn03

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #91 on: October 17, 2007, 05:27:54 PM »
Also this brings up something interesting that I have not thought of before. Many cores have a resonant frequency based off of their physical dimensions, I never really thought about looking for resonant points related to the molecular makeup of the core. What is the resonant frequency of the iron in the core? What if one were to have high power frequencies driven over the same core one at irons frequency and one at bariums frequency, would we see a disassociation of the material much like what Hutchison saw? I have no idea, Im definitely going to have to do some research on this one.

Offline armagdn03

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #92 on: October 17, 2007, 05:43:17 PM »
Well, the video was pretty cool, but now that we have the schematic and parts list, it's easy to see that the circuit is powered by the signal generator.  It's capacitively coupled through C2, bypassing the 10K resistor, and then through the input capacitance of the 2N7000 MOSFET, which is quite high.

R2 keeps the gate-to-source voltage around zero, and the data sheet for that MOSFET (http://www.ortodoxism.ro/datasheets/vishay/70226.pdf, for example) shows that the added 1V p-p signal from the signal generator is not enough to make it conduct at all, so capacitive coupling to B4 and L1 is its only function.

The inductances, C1, and other capacitances form a resonant circuit through which the signal generator drives the step-up transformer formed by L2 and L3.

L3 transmits the power to the LED at high voltage through one wire, which is pretty cool, and the D1+D2+D3 circuit picks it up.  I'm not able to analyze this part very well, but I'd guess that it uses the stray capacitiances beween the parts of the breadboard that Dr. Stiffler has already mentioned.

All in all, this circuit is pretty wierd.  I wonder why anyone would build such a thing?

Cheers,

Mr. Entropy


I guess alot of what I said was already said.
If this is negative energy, entropy, then we should be able to remove the ?Plug? part of the circuit from the bard, and it will still light the LED distance not really being an issue.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #92 on: October 17, 2007, 05:43:17 PM »
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Offline fritz

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #93 on: October 17, 2007, 05:51:31 PM »
mmmH,

Lots of things to bring together....
The impedance of the 10pf cap is 318Ohms at 50Meg
and 160Ohms ato 100Meg (thought it would be higher).
So this means a 5mW load which reduces the amount
of resonance voltage needed to suck even more power.

Another thing came to my mind:
The blue LED is operated pulsed with a frequency of
10MHz and a very short pulse duration.
Could be that the visual effect of such operation is
higher than the equivalent rms value DC operation
would be. Even the video camera can make the LED
shine brighter (on the recording).
My instinctive voice tells me that the losses increase
dramatically in this 1N4148/914/LED if operated in the
100 MHz range - a normal 4148 is slow as hell and stores
more charge than it switches (;-)))).
Maybe the state of the art blue LEDs have different behaviour.
So my contribution to that will be that I make an investigation:
Blue LED pulsed vs. DC, measuring the light intensity and
envelope with my highspeed photodiode.
Could be that the secondary voltage is rectified in the diode
itself, the transformed charge stored in the diode, 4148
works just as protection "resistor" hihi, hoho, hihi

rgds,

Wolfgang

Offline edork

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #94 on: October 17, 2007, 05:58:03 PM »
armagdn03 HI!

I had it all wrong, I do 50ohms transmitter with 50 ohm line and put 50 ohm load on it. Now I see, it is really 25 ohm, no wonder standing wave there.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #94 on: October 17, 2007, 05:58:03 PM »
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Offline fritz

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #95 on: October 17, 2007, 06:03:38 PM »
Just to clarify:

Measuring the voltage on the output resistor (inside the
pulse generator) with a scope (using  2 channels vs. gnd)
- or simply measure its temperature - is what I ment.
Output power can be calculated graphically - wouldn?t
trust ANY rms meter in this setup.
Or measure the power consumption of the pulse generator
output stage (DC) with open, shorted, or cirucuit attached... -
and than estimate....

rgds.

Offline jonesbeene

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #96 on: October 17, 2007, 06:45:18 PM »
If this type of circuit really does involve so-called "cold electricity" then why would you Fritz (Wolfgang), or anyone else expect a "conventional" meter or scope to give an accurate representation of what is happening?

Let me say up front that I do not know what cold-electricity is, nor do I know if it is a total fiction or not, nor do I know how to measure it otherwise. Until a few days ago, I would probably have chimed-in with the rest of you with a resounding "balderdash- no such thing as cold electricity" refrain.

That is precisely why this circuit begs to be replicated by those coming from differing backgrounds and perspectives. If others see the same thing, then perhaps it will allow a bit more credence, or confidence - to the entire concept of "cold electricity".

Otherwise Wolf and Linda, who are generally correct wrt conventional EE- are spinning their collective wheels in the mud of mainstream-limited-horizons.

Of course, even if cold electricity does not exist, the idea of a SigGen heating a resistor to such a degree is laughable.

Jones

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #96 on: October 17, 2007, 06:45:18 PM »
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Offline Freenrg4me

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #97 on: October 17, 2007, 07:24:08 PM »
*Removed* by RStiffler
« Last Edit: April 05, 2008, 09:12:41 PM by RStiffler »

Offline BEP

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #98 on: October 17, 2007, 07:45:38 PM »
My definition of cold electricity:

It is when your 10 Watt 1 ohm resistor, wired in series to the test circuit gets noticeably cooler than it should be. You freak out and check it with your IR thermometer and it shows much cooler than the bench area - even though it has been setting there all day and it is carrying current. Then you give up and have a cool one to clean the wild thoughts from your head. (Notice I didn't say 'another cool one'.)

After clarity arrives you decide to keep it to yourself because you are still bruised from the last time you made something like that public for replication.

Just my opinion.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #98 on: October 17, 2007, 07:45:38 PM »
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Offline jonesbeene

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #99 on: October 17, 2007, 07:46:10 PM »
Let me add one further thing into the mix - i.e. there is a distinct possibility of driving an LED to full brightness with a circuit which indicates absolutely *zero power* (measured with a conventional dedicated power analyzer) yet this circuit need not violate the sacrosanct Laws of Thermodynamics.

Just  today this story appeared in the science press
http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/533411/?sc=dwhp

... where an RF circuit is used "cool" a tiny silicon cantilever?  similar to the tuning forks used in 'quartz' watches but smaller ? and vibrating at 7 kHz its natural ?resonant? frequency and not far off from the loopstick. Well, this is a conversion, or transfer of one form of energy to another, and it is conservative - but it can offer some insight on how other resonant circuits might operate to "bootstrap" thermal or natural magnetic vibration into a separate electrical circuit - and give the appearance of overunity, when in fact the circuit is merely taping into a bit of ambient energy, not necessarily thermal.

In this case above the experimenters cooled the miniature lever from room temperature down to -228 C - quite impressive. I mention this experiment in the context of a ferrite core, where an (unnoticed) one degree or less, delta T change in entropy could perhaps- be converted into milliwatts of another form of energy ? We simply do not know what is going on.

Even if this explanation is way-off (it probably is since it is not well-thought out yet) the important point is that there are many hidden sources of ambient energy, there is a massive flux of solar neutrinos, Dirac energy and so on--  and a circuit which "appears" to extract 50 milliwatts from "nowhere" may be limited to whatever can be cohered from the hidden source.

IOW this circuit in question need not violate sacrosanct Laws of Thermodynamics, but it may 'violate' that EE degree, if it is frozen-in-time, and cannot be defrosted (even with RF irradiation ;-)

Jones


Offline edork

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #100 on: October 17, 2007, 07:55:42 PM »
Hi All

Hey Stifler not take site down they remove you log in - now very simple yes?

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #100 on: October 17, 2007, 07:55:42 PM »
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Offline Perraultium

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #101 on: October 17, 2007, 08:11:08 PM »
My definition of cold electricity:

It is when your 10 Watt 1 ohm resistor, wired in series to the test circuit gets noticeably cooler than it should be. You freak out and check it with your IR thermometer and it shows much cooler than the bench area - even though it has been setting there all day and it is carrying current. Then you give up and have a cool one to clean the wild thoughts from your head. (Notice I didn't say 'another cool one'.)

After clarity arrives you decide to keep it to yourself because you are still bruised from the last time you made something like that public for replication.

Just my opinion.

Why do you make these posts? You don't answer the question what OU device you have created? You make claims of being experienced but never back them up. Post your cold electricity circuit and I will validate whether it works or not.

Your egocentric need for attention does not serve a useful purpose here. You claim to be from Berlin but seem to use American slang and write like an American.

Now either put up, or shut up mister been there done that.

When life hands you lemons, make Perraultium - The high energy element made from a lemon with two probes shoved into it.

Offline BEP

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #102 on: October 17, 2007, 08:20:53 PM »
@Perraultium

'from Berlin'? I don't recall typing that.

Hmmm.... it seems only certain folks are allowed opinion here. Very well. I think I'll create an alias for myself and argue with myself for a while. That should be more productive than picking someones work apart without building it first.

It is obvious you want action. That type of action is best not posted here. Neither is a continuation of this conversation.

Offline Freenrg4me

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #103 on: October 17, 2007, 08:21:04 PM »
@ EDORK

Hi - Maybe one more post - He did take down some parts of the site. There was a part about an experiment where he was using his transformer to do electrolysis that was interesting.

He was hanging it out there as people tend to be critical of him and he had nothing to gain. I don't blame him for not wanting to hear from people. He sure does seem like an intelligent and nice person that I could learn a lot from.

What? No comment on the fundamental difference between the Meyer and Stiffler circuit? Compression vs decompression?

Cap, inductor, inductor verses inductor, inductor, cap? I really think the compression aspect of the circuit is something that is overlooked. But then I don't know jack about RF.

BIG OLD EDIT HERE

Hey - his BeFe core electrolyzer circuit is still there. I was wrong. He take down his papers for sale which is a bummer cause I wanted to but them and he did take down the ability to send hi a message.

Which I suppose is a message.

Offline fritz

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Re: Selfrunning cold electricity circuit from Dr.Stiffler
« Reply #104 on: October 17, 2007, 08:46:00 PM »
If this type of circuit really does involve so-called "cold electricity" then why would you Fritz (Wolfgang), or anyone else expect a "conventional" meter or scope to give an accurate representation of what is happening?

Of course, even if cold electricity does not exist, the idea of a SigGen heating a resistor to such a degree is laughable.

Jones

Well - what goes in must come out and vice versa -
if everything is shielded and nothing degrades during
operation ..... if not - we have a strange effect - if there
is more useable output than input we have overunity.

Using the temperature (generated heat) at termination
resistors is a typical method of measuring rf rms power.
Especially if the frequencies are very high.
The thermal output gives an exact measure for the rms
power involved. I think the equipement used for that is
called calorimeter (!?) not sure.

If a resistor gets hotter than calculated for the maximum
passive load - the unexpected heating gives the evidence
that the generator operates agains an active circuit or against
a back voltage - could be AC or DC.

This gives you a quite short and easy proof - without changing
the original wiring - because everything you connect might operate
as antenna and may emit em radiation.

So measuring the temperature of a resistor is a quite clever rf
measuring technique.

regards,
             Fritz (thank you for pointing out that I  had some nick
                      inconsistence)




 

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