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Author Topic: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices  (Read 90224 times)

Offline MarkSnoswell

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Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« on: July 15, 2007, 03:17:10 AM »
This thread discusses a possible explanation for TPU and other devices. It is intended to support and lead directly to rational experimental design.

Time permiting I will modify this first post as an index to valuable material as the threas gets longer.

The ideas I bring to the area come from years of part time experimental and theoretical research. I am well versed in the activities of the "free energy" and skeptic communities visible on the web now and in the past. My contribution is in developing new conceptual models that fit both classical engineering and the potential new phenomena being observed.

I am not interested in theory alone nor abstract concepts and maths. I seek simple conceptual models that can be visualised and used to design new technology. I have a well equiped workshops and do as much experimental work as time permits.

In post 5 & 6 I give an outline of the experimental sequence I will be following when I get time. If you have/are already doing simillar experiments or you plan to follow through the tests I suggest please let me know.

Cheers

Mark
--------------------------------------
Dr Mark Snoswell
President of the CGSociety  www.CGSociety.org
Publisher www.BallisticPublishing.com
CEO www.cgCharacter.com
« Last Edit: December 30, 2007, 03:03:59 PM by MarkSnoswell »

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Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2007, 03:22:56 AM »
Originally posted at: http://www.overunity.com/index.php/topic,2637.65.html

The three components and frequencies required for "interesting" results corelates with requirments for creating spinors. This is unpublished work so dont bother searching for it -- I would post animations but cant due to the size restrictions for attachments...

A simple spin 1/2 spinor can be constructed from 3 nested (referenced) harmonic oscillations of x, 2x and x frequencies in 3 orthogonal axis. It is possible to make real world circuits that exhibit spinor characteristics. I have sets of 3 orthognal coils that form a passive 3 phase resonator in which positive and negative phase rotation directions are distinguishable independantly of view. I was pleasantly suprised to find that strong resonance can also be achieved by tuning the component coils to x, 2x and x. -- to be absolutly clear these coils sets create passive 3 phase resonators that result in rotational fields and most importantly the two rotation directions are view independantly rocognizable in the same way left and right helices (and positive and negative charge) are distinct. It is also posible to make spin 1/2 neutral spinors in which the field is spinning but with no net view independant rotation -- as in neutrons.

I comment here simply to make the observation that the TPU and other related devices (Aurelano's "Mexican device" and Hollingsheads devices) all appear to embody spinor resonance configurations. No one seems to have noticed this as yet... Regretably the quaternion maths to describe spinors is hardly taught outside the one practical application of 3D rotations in 3D applications. Visualization of quaternion and spinors is even less know -- barely done at all.

I have been working on new vizualizations of spinors and have discovered a diverse range of coil configurations that make sense from the point of creating (or tuning into) spinor resonance but are nonsensical in any other context. I supose I can release one image now -- all of the apparent "coils" in the attached image are actually snapshots of trace lines through 3D space as it is distorted by a radiating spinnor. -- forget any intuition borrowed from simple axial rotation as you look at this image. Spinors work quite differnetly -- the spin direction and axis are indicated by the white arrow in the foreground. If you look closley you will also note that the traces spirall in counterwound fashion.

anyway... a lot of what people are stumbling onto appears to make good sense from the standpoint of spinor resonance which, as you can see, is very different from simple single axis rotational systems.

I also attached a (sorry for the blur) scope trace showing output of a passive 3 phase resonator. The phase separation is not perfect in this shot -- it's very dificult to tune perfectly and reject the background single phase resonance in the component coils. The 3 phase resonance has a Q >10x the Q for single phase resonance of component coils and is very difcult to tune into. If you didn't know it was there it would be extreemly dificult to find.

Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2007, 03:26:44 AM »
Originally posted at http://www.overunity.com/index.php/topic,2637.69.html

In response to questions in a few PM's.

One of my recent activities is as founder and president of the Computer Graphics Society www.CGSociety.org

I have been lurking around this field for a long time. I have rarely posted anywhere before because of the low signal to noise ratio in public forums. I am posting here now because I noticed a good signal to noise ratio and a number of people that are doing real work and thinking.

I have been doing some caerfull experiments in a number of areas for a a number of years. The research and experiments are aimed at understanding what is really happening rather then trying to duplicate others work.

I have visited some very interesting people and groups that are very secretive. Steven Marks TPU is not unique -- it has almost exactly the same behaviour, artifacts, failure modes etc as at least one other groups technology that I have seen.

I have been developing conceptual models for spacetime, particles (spinor waves) and spherical wave interactions etc for some years now. Spinors are central to this -- I cant stress enough just how different real spherical rotation (spinor) is to the common concept of rotation. No one will fully understand untill you see the animations and play with the parameters -- lots of them.

One of the rare posts I made a while ago is here http://marksnoswell.cgsociety.org/gallery/329928 it's rough and unedited but will interest the readers here.

I believe I have a good conceptual model that fits with current theories but simply explains what is happening in areas that embarass current theories -- things like black holes, renormalization, and the ratio of gravity to electromagnetic forces. When I find time to present it well I'll put it up on the web. It also appears to fit with a number of features people ar stumbling onto in areas such as the TPU -- it also neatly supports Randal Mills CQM. However what is most encouraging is that it has suggested practical devices and experiments which are exhibiting predictable and novel features in early research.

AH -- I see I miss read the attachment limitation previously -- I can upload some of the animations. Attached is a recent development I made -- it's a simple three shell solution for a spinor. There are three nested shells - each linkes to the next. There is a simple harmonic rotation on each shell as shown. This demonstrates the application of 3 components -- two at a fundamental frequency and one at the second harmonic -- that combine to create a spinor. I made this development in response to the desire to come up with a spinor fomulation that I coul make from nested coils. I believe that this (and it's topoligical equivelants) is the simplest posible formulation of a spinor. The practical side of the research is in early stages but appears to support the theory so far.

goto go now.

cheers.

Mark.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2007, 03:26:44 AM »
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Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2007, 03:28:23 AM »
Originally posted at http://www.overunity.com/index.php/topic,2637.72.html

just time for some quick notes...

Must have pulses for (efficent) OU effects... you need a spin wave front. If the core effect is due to spin waves fronts driving spinor resonance then the timing of component signals within SM TPU configuration will not be what you expect -- Start with full control of pulse timing and separation for three drive coils and just tune up one at a time.

Drive coils dont need to be closed -- leave them open circuit and it will still work (with dramatically lower input requirment). It's the spin pulse on potential jump that is the motive force. This is the pulse Edison engineers noticed and Tesla called the radiant pulse. By wrapping a collector wire with the drive coil the resulting spin wave front drives current down the central collector coil -- this is what SM alluded to as "like squezing water along a hose". (Ideally the potential pulse is so short that it can be contained within a percentage of the drive coil -- there will be an optimum pulse width but that probably a lot shorter then anyone is using at present.)

Static bias potentials -- both electric and magnetic -- can/need-to be controled for tuning. (This can be used to modulate the output for ease of matching/forming to power grid frequency.)

There is an exponential relationship of static potential to output -- drive with high voltage pulses for maximum effect. Conversly you will have a hard time tuning devices with low voltage pulses.

Start with sine waves and you wont get anywhere. -- you will get lots of nice rotating fields but no easy access to interesting effects.

cheers

mark.

Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2007, 03:32:05 AM »
Originally posted at http://www.overunity.com/index.php/topic,2637.75.html

Quote from: Jdo300 on July 13, 2007, 01:56:09 PM
...
The "second harmonic component" seems to line up with your idea of using x, 2x, x harmonics. Can the effect still work if all three frequencies are the same and just phase shifted?


No. In principal -- 3 in phase signals in 3 non-linked coils just vectorially add to a single component. You need independant control of pulse timing and the right coil design... but this is all based on work I have done simulating spinors. This work seems to fit SM and other devices better than any other theory I have seen but thats no guarantee that its right. Right now I am trying to extend my spinor generation software (a plugin within 3ds max) so I can search for higher order frequency relationships. I expect that exact phase timings will depend on the physical relationship of the coils -- there will also be different timings (harmonics) you can drive at given a single physical setup.

What is certain is that three independant components are required to create spinors. There is a huge range of physical ways to generate these components. There is also a corresponding large range of potential signal sets to create different spinors. As SM said -- start with one drive and then just vary the second component looking for maximum output... and then add the third and itterate to improve. After you have a set of timings that work then you can start to experiment with resonant feedback.

hm... if I get a chance over the next few days I'll put up an animation that makes this all clearer.

Mark.

PS. In some ways SM's TPU designs are sloppy -- at a guess about 10 years behind a competive technology. Although interesting effects seem easy to get *precise* physical designs should result in even more suprising effects. Whatever people make they should strive for very neat construction and be aware of small design changes that influence the output. As a hint look at Randal Mills work with generating Hydrinos and ask yourself how a low energy (reduced spin) electron from a hydrino would behave as a charge carrier in a wire.

Mark.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2007, 03:32:05 AM »
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Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2007, 03:35:16 AM »
Originally posted at http://www.overunity.com/index.php/topic,2637.78.html

Hi,
     If I am on the right track with the spinor resonance then phase, pulse timing and coil configurations wont quite be what you expect -- that doesnt mean they will be complicated, but not what classical intuition would lead you to expect. Simple experimentation is called for...

I won?t have time to do experimental work on this project for a few months. I have some other projects to finish, an overseas trip and an office to move first.

 If anyone is interested this is exactly how I will start. I?m giving instructions here so that others can try this if they wish. No guarantees -- this is just what I plan to do based on every bit of practical, hearsay and theoretical information I have to hand.

Construction:

1.   Starting with a single collector coil and primary. I would use some heavy duty coax for my collector coils as this provides a perfect core to wind the primaries on. RG218 is a good candidate. Cut 1196mm length and strip the outer sheath and remove the braiding ? this leaves the 15.7mm OD PE dielectric with 4.95mm OD copper core. The reason for using the coax is that you want precise and even spacing of the primary coil from the surface of the collector wire. I think this will work better than a stranded core ? it?s the precise/consistent spacing that is critical. Leave the striped coax straight for now.

2.   Wind a primary coil. I would do this on my lathe winding tightly with 1mm OD magnet wire over a  15mm OD steel former. After winding ? when the tension is released the coil will spring back enough to easily remove it from the former. It should slide snugly over the 15.7mm coax core you have prepared.

3.   The RG218 core is 5mm OD solid copper ? not very flexible and very hard to solder too neatly. For connecting to it I would drill 0.95mm holes radial into it right near the ends. I would then inert 1mm solid wire that I had sanded to a slight taper.

4.   Shrink wrap to hold the primary firmly in place. Alternately wrap tightly with a single layer of electrical tape.

5.    I would bend the completed collector with primary coil assembly over a circular former to bend into circular form. Tape the ends together and you can remove it from the form. The heavy copper core of the RG218 will help to stabilize the circle.

6.   *Variation: I would actually wind a perfect counterwound primary in anticipation of testing single primary vs counterwound. The reason for this is that we are interested in the spin wave front and not the B field generated by the primary. It may work better to eliminate the B field by applying the pulse to a counterwound primary. It is easy to wind a counterwound primary now and start testing driving just one helix. (I attached a photograph of the first counterwound coil I ever wound -- I found a novel way to make these perfectly and easily and made a whole lot of them a while back

**OK -- you can also try a complete coax solution -- using the shield as the primary and core as the collector. In theory I thik this would work but the speed fo the spin wave front would be to fast to make for a practical design with a managable circumference.


Test procedure:

1.   Start with just one primary/collector coil.

2.   Connect the collector to a low impedance load ? a 100w incandescent light bulb.

3.   Drive the primary coil with the shortest pulse you can cleanly generate.  I would use a 600V MOSFET and drive with rectified mains voltage ~ 340V. I would use a good MOSFET driver like TC4421 and do everything else possible to ensure a clean fast pulse.

4.   Slowly sweep the drive frequency from 1Khz or so up to 100Khz looking for a peak in output. At this stage any peak should have a relatively low Q so it should be easy to find.

5.   I would then vary the pulse width ? looking to see if there is an optimum.

6.   I would repeat the previous step with single wound and counterwound primaries. I would try it with the primaries open circuit first and then closed to ground through a modest resistive load ? 1K ? 100K or so. The reasoning here is that we are looking for the optimum timing of the spin wave front pushing (SM talks about kicking and squeezing) a charge pulse down the collector == very fast circulating static field == very fast rotating magnetic field.

7.   After finding the optimum drive frequency for the first collector coil I would then add a second coil set. Space it one primary minor diameter above the first coil set ? that will be 15.7mm. I would use acetal or nylon spacers to hold the coil sets apart and tape them firmly together.
 
8.   I would series connect the collectors and check that with just driving the bottom primary things are working as expected. With the first primary (bottom coil set) running I would sweep the drive frequency of the second primary looking for further increase in the output. I would expect the Q to be higher now so I would sweep more slowly so as not to miss a resonance peak.

9.   I would repeat the previous step with the third (top) coil set added.

** After getting the three coil sets working as well as possible I would look at adding a bias coil around the whole set ? this is the single outer toroidal winding over SM devices.  I would use this winding to control both the static and magnetic bias environment for the three coil sets.

** All of this would be done with three independent signal sources. Only after getting everything tuned and working like this would I attempt to put in resonant feedback ? from one collector to the next primary.

** I would also repeat all of the above with three segment primary coils on a single colector and injecting the three frequencies into those three primaries on a single collector. I would try 3 primaries covering 120 deg and also 3 primaries covering 360 deg but tharting 120 apart.

If any of you are looking for control boards check out www.futurlec.com ? I would not use the http://www.futurlec.com/ATMEGA_Controller.shtml even though it has 6 independent PWM?s ? it?s too slow and you cant get good precise pulse width control over 10Khz or so. I am looking at using 3 of these http://www.futurlec.com/ARM7024_Controller.shtml and syncing them up.


Mark.

Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2007, 03:41:01 AM »
Originally posted at http://www.overunity.com/index.php/topic,2637.80.html


Additional note for experimenters:

When series connecting the colector coils you have to either trim the conector length or tune the pulse delay (phase) of the drive coils. The reson is that it's the phase alignment and spacing of the multiple pulse trains in the collector coil that can give rise to a spinor resonance.


Tao -- yes I saw your posts... and everything else in this forum.


Rob -- "RE: spinor_--_electrical_coil_analouge_-_45deg_helicies.jpg
Does this show 4 conical shaped vorticies of magnetic field?"

No. I have attached the image here again for reference. The "coils" you see are trace lines through 3D space. This image is a composite showing some of the distorion of space at various points inside a spinor. As it is a spin 1/2 spinor it repeats every 720 deg (NOT 360 deg). At + 45 deg you get the orange and at -45 deg the red conical pairs of spacial distortions. At 360 deg you get the pancacke and solenoid distortion (in fact all of the spherical volume is wound up at 360 deg).
This image suggests that a spinor resonance could be generated with various coils wound in a simillar fashion to the image. However phasing of the coils would be dificult -- thay would best be driven with timed pulses at the phase angles I indicated.

I have attached two animations of composite spinors. There is *no* tnagling of space. In the first animation you can see that the central spere rotates twice in one cycle -- this is a spin 1/2 characteristic. You are looking at a representation of a spherical wave like the one that could be an electron or proton. These waves spin space continuously but never tangle space. There is no magic or trickery here although it is beyond everyday intuition -- you really can take any closed 3D volume and spin it continuously in oue direction without it ever geting tangled.

In the second animation you see a layered spinor (it's still spin 1/2). With the multiple spinors layered it is easier to se the regular distortions of space at various points in the 720 deg cycle.

In case you think these animations show an unrealistic distortion of space -- they do not. With a Plank length mesh and the diameter of a proton the distortions you see here would be flatter than the curvature of surface of the Earth!


The final image is a snapshot of orthognal trace lines distorted in a 3 phase spinor with homogenous energy distribution into all availble curvature modes, but with rigid shells for any given radius. The remarkable feature is that space is spiraling along every axis -- even though there is no tangling of and we are dealing with harmonic rotations of rigid spherical shells!

Cheers

mark.

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2007, 03:41:01 AM »
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Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2007, 03:53:54 AM »
Answers to Earl's questions

Quote from: Earl
Why do you use the term "3-phase" in the image name:
3_phase_spinor_-__Mark_Snoswell_2006_.jpg

Because the i, j and k components of the quaternion function have sine waves 120 deg apart... as oposed to the classical belt trick forumulation of q(t, β) = [ sin2(β) + cos2(β)cos(2t, π), 0, cos(β)sin(β)(1 - cos(2tπ)), cos(β)sin(2tπ) ] where the j term is zero.

See here for a detailed explanation of the belt trick and quaternions http://books.elsevier.com/companions/0120884003/vq/Belt-Trick/index.html  ... this is as far as anyone had gone visualizing quaternions. I started there and have gone a lot further -- when I get time I will put all the results up on my own web page.

Quote from: Earl
If one was to take the copper-colored cone-shaped coils, as in the image below, and feed the two cones with HV narrow pulses of opposite polarity (at the pointed ends) would a radiant energy collector as shown in green be the best location?  Or the flat spiral Tesla type of coil colored in blue?  Or maybe the outside purple-colored coil?  Here the pulses would have to be sufficiently short and the cone coil conductors sufficiently long such that the pulse would end before something traveling at the speed of light reached the end of the cone coil.  This is an absolutely crazy idea that has nothing to do with traditional engineering thought.

Who knows -- these sorts of things have not been done before. However I am not really interested in random experiments but rather caerfull tests to validate theory and move towards new devices with an understanding of how they work. I have started this and the results are very encouraging -- but I am not commenting further on that work here and now.


cheers

mark.


Offline gn0stik

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2007, 10:02:47 AM »
Awesome mark, and thanks. Like I said, not to detract, but it's better here, anyway. Your theories are all together and make a coherent picture here as well, reading them all in a row like that.

Nice

Much appreciated mate.
Rich

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2007, 10:02:47 AM »
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Offline bitRAKE

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2007, 11:16:18 AM »
Theory is very important with so many unknowns, but my gut has me throwing together a tetrahedral device - should be pumping signals through it soon.
/me sits in front row...

Offline Gustav22

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2007, 11:39:14 AM »
....Cut 1196mm length...

Hi MarkSnoswell,

I was curious why you chose such a seemingly awkward length.
So I tired to find out, and if my calculations are correct, 1196mm circumference lead to a ring of ca. 38cm (15") diameter.

Please let me know why you have chosen this specific diameter
and/or which other diameters you think make sense
and/or whether all collector diameters imaginable are equally feasible to achieve success.

Thank you.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2007, 11:39:14 AM »
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Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2007, 02:16:19 PM »
I was curious why you chose such a seemingly awkward length.
So I tired to find out, and if my calculations are correct, 1196mm circumference lead to a ring of ca. 38cm (15") diameter.

LOL... as good as any size to start with -- not to to small and not to big. There is nothing to indicate that any particular size is best so I figured why not use the size SM has inspired everyone to try. I also dont think that it's a particular fundamental frequency that is important if it's spinor resonances as I suspect -- The absolute frequency is only important to tune to the physical properties of the coils used. It's the topology and frequency ratios that are important -- absolute static biases are also important factors in that they make the systems more coherent. 

Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2007, 04:54:38 PM »
So where does the energy come from?  Electron spin. That?s the short answer? we convert a very small amount of an electron spin to a lot of momentum == electromotive force == useful current.

I figured that?s the best way to start ? just blurt out the answer and then back it up. As time permits I?ll explain more the supporting postulates. They are just postulates, not dogma. I may be wrong; however I do believe that I have a small set of concepts that show the way forward without discarding the beautiful work of those who have gone before. I?m not so arrogant to turn my back on the geniuses of the past or present ? instead I stand on their shoulders in an attempt to look out further and deeper into the nature of things. Above all I strive to make things clear for everyone and not just the mathematically gifted ? these are conceptual models that I will present; with all due respect and deference to the great mathematical works of past and present.

So back to the questions everyone wants to know the answer to -- where does the ?free? energy come from and how do we tap it??
 In practice Randal Mills (www.blacklightpower.com) has provided the most modern and compelling experimental evidence for this. Mills has shown that the electron in hydrogen can be dropped to a lower energy level than was previously thought possible. The amount of power released by dropping the electron to a lower energy level is >100x more than released by chemical oxidation of hydrogen. Mills shows that dropping the electron to this lower level is a non-radiative process ? it does not involve emission of a photon.
Now rather then get into a deeper discussion of Mills process and arguments I want to address the question ? why does it work? Why can we lower an electron to a lower energy level and get a lot of energy out? The simple reason is that the vast amount of energy in ?particles? is in their spin. When I say particles here I am referring to fermions ? electrons, protons and neutrons. These all exhibit spin ? -- which means that they are spin waves in a simply connected 3D space? if the language is confusing then just think of them as spinning waves... But very special spinning waves of the sort in the attached animation. I can?t stress enough just how different the spinning waves are than your normal concept of spin. Physicists refer to these waves as spinors and I will use that term (and spin) to distinguish them from normal (single axis) rotation. I plan to do lots of animations so that everyone can learn to be intuitively happy with the truth that you can take any closed volume of space and spin it?s surface in one direction ? without every tangling 3D space. This sounds fantastic but it is a simple property of 3D space ? but the mathematics, even the concept, is not taught at high school or even at most university level courses? but more on that later. Back to our main theme for now?

But we have been taught that the energy in ?particles? is in their mass ? there is no mention of spin and energy. Yes we have ? but there is subtle error in this intuition. Mass is just curvature of space ? that is pure symmetrical curvature == compression or expansion. It takes energy to curve space and that gives us the Energy=Mass  (forget the constant of c^2 in e=mc^2). So isn?t there a lot of energy in curved space ? Yes, but how do you curve space. How does a spinor (I?ll switch to spinors rather than particles from now on)  create curvature of space. The answer is by spinning ? and remember this is a spinor wave not a simple single axis rotation. The curvature (mass) component of space distortion of a spinor is a symptom of the spin ? not the cause. Spin is the cause ? mass is the symptom; and the *vast* amount of energy is in the spin.

Why is most of the energy in the spin of a spinor rather than it?s mass? The reason is that energy will flow into every available mode possible. I will come back to this in a more rigorous manner at a later date ? for now let?s imagine a simple model? Think of space as a 3D mesh of springs ? introduce some vibration. The number of distortional modes in even a small volume of our 3D mesh is vast ? however the ratio of twisting modes outnumbers pure curvature modes by a truly vast amount == the ratio of the gravitational constant to the EM force. This ratio is on the order of 10^40.

OK ? 3D space has a vast number of ?twist and spin? modes compared to compression. The ?twist and spin? modes are what gives rise to electro magnetism. This gives us both an opportunity and a problem: The opportunity is that we can tap spin energy. The problem is that 3D space can twist and spin in so many modes that it?s incredibly difficult to control the spin. This is the reason that we haven?t stumbled onto the control, and taping, of spin before. It takes an exquisite degree of control to grab a hold of a spinor (an electron say) and manipulate it?s spin.

Put another way ? the key to unlocking vast amounts of energy is not brute force (as in atomic fusion and fission) it?s control. You need almost no energy, but a great deal of control to unlock a whole range of exciting new effects and energies.

So how much control do we need to control spin? A way to get an idea is to ask how much control do we need to generate a spinor? It turns out that we need at least three independent parameters. This does not mean three magnetic fields ? they would just add up to one field. You need three *independent* parameters to combine at one location. There are lots of possibilities and this is a new area that I am actively researching ? conceptually, constructing animations and looking for fundamental concepts. One of the simplest solutions I have found (which is new) is the nested combination of 3 harmonic waves at frequency ratios x,2x and x. The practical goal is to come up with simple devices that let us control spin == which will result in coupling spin and curvature == gravity, inertia, time, and electro magnetism.

What happens to a low energy electron if we make one ? how does the energy come out? If you drop the spin of an electron you alter it?s charge. As Mills has shown you also alter the energy levels it can readily reach to emit and receive photons. In the first place the altered charge creates a charge imbalance in the surrounding medium and our low energy electron is accelerated electrostatically ? we have current. But now our low energy electron is moving it has very limited opportunity to interact with normal electrons ? there are no allowed energy gaps and so it behaves as a superconducting electron. It can still drive inductive processes, so it?s not hard to couple it to ordinary electrical flow through a transformer. However if a low energy electron does manage to jump up to ground level it takes up energy cooling the environment and resulting in transfer of it?s EMF to ordinary electron flow. These are the characteristics of ?cold electricity? that appear in increasing numbers of reports associated with ?free energy? research.

Enough for now ? It?s (too) late again. I had hoped to explain how this all ties into TPU?s and similar devices ? the accompanying magnetic field (just a different view of spin) jumps etc? later. Many of the consequences should already be apparent to the astute reader.

I  have attached three animations. A single strap animation that shows a connection to a spinning object. notice that it takes two rotations of the object to return to the original condition == 720 deg for one cycle == spin 1/2. THe second animation is a very early and crude hand animation of a spin ? spinor. As crude as it is it is the clearest demonstrator that you can spin a region of space (the sphere in the middle) in one direction without every tangling it?s connection to 3D space. Spinors in 3D space come in two, view independent, forms (handedness) positive and negative ? which is why we have two charges.
I dont have a clean animation to showing the class of spinors that fermions (electrons, protons and neutrons) belong to -- it's a class of spinors with nested positive and negative spinors such that the inside and outside are static. This is the form of a stable spherical standing wave. This is the basic form most likely to represent stable real word spinors ? our electrons, protons and neutrons. Which also brings in the the whole concept of spherical inversion...

g'dnight for now.

Mark Snoswell.

Offline bob.rennips

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2007, 12:02:04 AM »
Mark, I thoroughly enjoy reading your posts. You explain very well indeed. Thank you.

When you talk about modes, you introduced the idea of 'twist'.

In the same way that you are using the term 'spin' to '...distinguish them from normal (single axis) rotation...' is a 'twist' something different in spinar-world, or is it a general term to mean some fraction or multiple of a 720degree turn of a spinar ?

thanks. Bob R.

Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Spinor resonance -- explanation for TPU like devices
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2007, 10:18:57 AM »
In the same way that you are using the term 'spin' to '...distinguish them from normal (single axis) rotation...' is a 'twist' something different in spinor-world, or is it a general term to mean some fraction or multiple of a 720degree turn of a spinor ?

Hi Bob,
   No -- I was just referring to all of the random vibrational modes that you can subject a connected mesh to.

Here is a simple example of comparing the number of pure compression modes to twist (skew, torsion -- whatever term you like)....

Now before I give this explanation please note that it's not completely correct -- it's simplified to make presentation of the concept easier.

Think of the minimum platonic solid for 3D space - the tetrahedron. It is made up of 4 nodes and 6 connections. Let?s ask ourselves two questions
1. How can we move the nodes so that we change the volume without introducing any twist == curvature == mass.
2. How can be move the nodes to introduce twist but not alter the volume == twist == electromagnetism.

In the first image you see the solution to 1. You can move the nodes along lines radiating from the center of the tetrahedron.

In the second image you see the solution for moving one node so that the volume remains the same but the tetrahedron is twisted. There is a conical surface that you can move each node over.

So what is the ratio of the number of possibilities for twist verses compression? ... well a 2 dimensional space divided by a one dimensional line is an infinite ratio -- nonsensical. The point is that there are vastly more twist modes than there are pure compression modes. The ratio goes up as you increase the volume and complexity of 3D mesh...

If we model space as a plank length 3D mesh made of nodes and links only then by the time we get to the scale of a proton it appears that there is almost no chance of energy appearing as a coherent compression or expansion of space -- it's little wonder that the ratio of gravity to electromagnetic forces is 10^40 -- a number so large that it's beyond comprehension -- in fact it's about the ratio of the diameter of a proton to the diameter of the entire known universe!


But we are not interested in random energy -- we are interested in stable particles. Particularly in electrons because so many of our machines run on electric current. Electrons, protons and neutrons (the fermions) are examples of stable waves. They oscillate -- it's not until you have a stable repeating spherical wave that you can talk about it as a spinor. What the meaning or effect of twisted space would be is unknown. So I talk about twist just to differentiate it from curvature -- actually I sound probably talk about torsion and curvature of space.


hmmm... that leads me to think about what I should explain next. I want to stay close to things that will help experimenters. I think it would be best to talk about collective electrodynamics. I would encourage anyone flowing this thread to get and study Carver Meads book, Collective Electrodynamics. The first chapter is online and is substantially based on this http://www.pnas.org/cgi/reprint/94/12/6013.pdf Even if you can?t follow the simple maths Carvers explanations are elegant and clear...

Anyway... Next post I will explain why static bias (both magnetic and charge) are important in achieving non classical (and over unity possibly) effects. -- put simply there is a very good reason for using a high static voltage to get anomalous effects.

Cheers

Mark.

PS. I was very impressed to see that Bob Boyce stated that he did not achieve over unity in his toroidal units unless the static voltage of the secondary was over 11.5 volts ? and the higher the bias voltage the better. He used 110 ? 160Volts static bias I believe. I look for clues like this to identify people with a lot of real experience and devices worthy of further study.

PPS. A bias of 5Kv or higher would be even better ? *much* better as I?ll explain next time.


 

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