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Mechanical free energy devices => mechanic => Topic started by: d3adp00l on April 16, 2007, 08:11:57 AM

Title: new motor design
Post by: d3adp00l on April 16, 2007, 08:11:57 AM
Hey guys I was on youtube and came across a video which was a conference of some kind and they demostrated a very simple motor design. Problem is I can't find the video again. It was a stator with about nine mags in it, ten would have fit but one was left out on purpose. they took the ring that held the stator mags and held it by hand above a donut magnet mounted on the top of what looked like a steel ball. Looked like it worked, keep your eyes out for it or try it. The missing magnet was important for the rotation. Maybe it allowed a low energy point for a single space on the donut mag at a time and given that equal force elsewhere was being placed on the mag other points on the donut would move into the low point and create some momentum. Let me know what you see/think/findout.
Title: Re: new motor design
Post by: FreeEnergy on April 16, 2007, 08:41:22 AM
probably the Hamel Spinner

do a google on it :)

peace
Title: Re: new motor design
Post by: d3adp00l on April 16, 2007, 08:52:47 AM
That looks like it, The google turned up one that was sectional like I had seen, but none where missing a magnet from the outer ring. From the explaination on the video, one had to be missing in order for it to work.
Title: Re: new motor design
Post by: FreeEnergy on April 16, 2007, 09:02:39 AM
yes this video has been posted here somewhere in overunity.com, just don't know where exactly.

i also have read somewhere that the missing magnet makes no difference, why? i don't know.
Title: Re: new motor design
Post by: FreeEnergy on April 16, 2007, 11:19:08 AM
found it! :)

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6530165466308380947
Title: Re: new motor design
Post by: Low-Q on April 16, 2007, 12:39:10 PM
Hey guys I was on youtube and came across a video which was a conference of some kind and they demostrated a very simple motor design. Problem is I can't find the video again. It was a stator with about nine mags in it, ten would have fit but one was left out on purpose. they took the ring that held the stator mags and held it by hand above a donut magnet mounted on the top of what looked like a steel ball. Looked like it worked, keep your eyes out for it or try it. The missing magnet was important for the rotation. Maybe it allowed a low energy point for a single space on the donut mag at a time and given that equal force elsewhere was being placed on the mag other points on the donut would move into the low point and create some momentum. Let me know what you see/think/findout.
An "old" man is showing this, right?

I have seen it. The trick is that the doughnut magnet on the steel ball is attraced to the hand held magnet ring, with the missing magnet. The steel ball is not resting 90 degrees, so when the resting point is out of center the magnet will spin as soon as the doughnut magnet is moving towards the magnet. Thats why the device do not work when both the doughnut magnet is fixed on a rod with bearings and the ring magnet is fixed.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6530165466308380947

Here is the thread on overunity.com:
http://www.overunity.com/index.php?topic=973.msg7139

Br.

Vidar
Title: Re: new motor design
Post by: d3adp00l on April 16, 2007, 11:18:40 PM
It would be interesting to see if the two parts can be mounted on a flexible c/v type mount to allow for the pertibations to allow for rotation.
Title: Re: new motor design
Post by: Low-Q on April 19, 2007, 07:05:09 PM
If I understand correctly, the hand held magnet are all equal poles facing inwards. The magnet attached to the steel ball is a ringmagnet magnetized through thickness. There are therfor no force which determine if it will go clockwise or counter clockwise.

Br.

Vidar
Title: Re: new motor design
Post by: CLaNZeR on April 19, 2007, 10:35:10 PM
Have played with this a bit and hamel links over at http://www.overunity.org.uk

Regards

Sean.