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Author Topic: High Efficiency Mosfet Switching for Pulse Motor  (Read 694 times)

Offline Energy Hack

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  • Posts: 8
High Efficiency Mosfet Switching for Pulse Motor
« on: August 03, 2022, 05:57:00 AM »
Hi All,

I've been working on various Pulse Motors using a simple Mosfet switching circuit to turn coils ON/OFF.  Inductive spike is recovered to second battery bank that sits in parallel to drive bank and the banks are swapped every minute or so.  I can measure about 75-80% power recovery to the second bank.  Looking for tips to improve the switching circuit as I believe that is where the magic happens.  If I can get to 100% recovery then next step is to mechanically recover a little power from the rotor.

See attached diagram of set up and best results to date.  Thanks!



Offline bistander

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Re: High Efficiency Mosfet Switching for Pulse Motor
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2022, 07:21:07 AM »
.

Offline aussiebattler

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Offline Cadman

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Re: High Efficiency Mosfet Switching for Pulse Motor
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2022, 03:21:53 PM »
Energy Hack,

As long as you are discarding the initial coil energizing current your existing setup will likely be under unity over all.

Since you are using pulsed DC there are at least two methods that may improve the situation.

1 is to run your motor between battery positives in order to recover a portion of that energizing current. Not easy, but doable.

2 is to add secondary generating windings around, or inside of, your motor coils with a diode that allows those those coils to conduct only during the collapse of the primary pulse. Doing it this way keeps the secondary from interfering with the primary motor coil pulse. But, since you’re using air core you may be able to omit the diode and use a rectifier with the secondary for even more output. To make use of the secondary generation, the emf from these coils has to be greater than the charge batteries so it might be advantageous to store this in caps and use a timed cap discharge.


Offline kolbacict

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Re: High Efficiency Mosfet Switching for Pulse Motor
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2022, 03:54:38 PM »
I did this a long time ago using a normal two-phase computer fan.
Only the circuit was completely changed, there was only one transistor.
Like a blocking generator. The miracle did not happen, both batteries gradually discharged.

Offline Energy Hack

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Re: High Efficiency Mosfet Switching for Pulse Motor
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2022, 05:33:19 PM »
Cadman,

Thanks for comments.  I've tried the between the positives things and have seen good results where the batteries run 2x their stated capacity.  However, it still wasn't OU.  I did a You tube on that maybe a year ago.  Here is link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHUWscSD03M

I saw another guy (Mike Clarke) do a version of the basic pulse motor recovery circuit and get 100% of the drive current back to his charge batteries.  That's what I'm aiming for.  When the batts are in parallel I quickly get much higher recovery of drive current - easily over 50%.  When I go up in voltage I find the recovery gets better.  80+ % is somewhat easily achievable.  I believe with better mosfet driving circuitry and component selection I can get close to 100%.

In reality, I believe the magnets whizzing by the drive coils at high speed have a way of adding magnet flux that is then recovered as current to the charge battery when the switch is off.
 

Offline indigo22

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Re: High Efficiency Mosfet Switching for Pulse Motor
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2022, 06:01:58 AM »
By pulsing a coil you create radiant, you do not need a rotor. There are coils that create ou and transformers. By pulsing the right coil and high speed, programed like 5 procent on 95 off you create a radiant spike in motors aka backemf, that big radiant negative spike ac can be transformed into dc plus, the only way 2 do that is by capacitors or batteries.

Offline indigo22

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Re: High Efficiency Mosfet Switching for Pulse Motor
« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2022, 06:04:54 AM »
For switching i used j bedini mls but i would rather go for irfs right now in parralel irf840 :)

Offline indigo22

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Re: High Efficiency Mosfet Switching for Pulse Motor
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2022, 06:08:33 AM »
When i got my nobel price 4 perpetuum mobile, i used a car batterie a 2 farad capacitor to convert ac to dc programmend a microchip to read the voltage over the capacitor, then switches to connect the 24 volt capacitor to the 12 volt car batterie.. let it run 4 1 night the voltage of the car batterie went UP