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Author Topic: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator  (Read 7099 times)

Offline Lunkster

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #15 on: October 10, 2022, 04:14:28 PM »
Hello All,

The attached drawing shows a balanced optional
way to generate electrical energy on my generator
designs without the use of diodes. 
Though small, diodes do create a loss across themselves.
With FE devices, every reduction of losses are helpful.
I  show both a mechanical and electrical option.
I am not sure if I have seen these options before.

The electrical option will likely be more desirable
but the mechanical option could be used in devices
like the electric assist bicycle. 

These designs takes the design of my last post
and combines the two devices into one device
by having one drive component for the device
which eliminates the need for the diodes.
The direction of the PMs from the right side
and the left side of the device are different.

There is a lot of information from different
articles about motionless electrical generators
that explains how the permanent magnet in
the generator interacts with the coils in the
generator to produce a COP > 1.

Lunkster
« Last Edit: October 10, 2022, 07:37:06 PM by Lunkster »

Offline Lunkster

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2022, 11:41:14 PM »
Hello all,

I have updated a few of my generator designs
by switching the permanent magnet and coil
positions in the device.  The reason for this is
that it may increase the performance of the device.

Testing a sub-assembly first before building the
full prototype may be a good option for someone
to do who may want to build one of these devices.

Lunkster

Offline truesearch

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2022, 06:51:03 PM »
@Lunkster

I appreciate your efforts and what you've chosen to share here  :)  Thanks!

Just a quick question regarding your non-mechanic image from above (cropped image attached below): for the "drive-coil" did you think that the signal/wave-form should simply increase/decrease to cause a magnetic on/off situation (A in my attached image below)? or should the magnetic coil-domain rather need to "flip" back and forth North/South (B in my attached image) ?

Offline Lunkster

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #18 on: October 14, 2022, 12:24:16 AM »
Hello,

First of all the two individual output coils of the rev. 2 prototype
generator have been distorted signals.  With a leading step before
the peek with the PMs in one direction and a lagging step in the signal
in the lagging signal.

So the idea is if I combine the two output signal together either
in series or parallel then hopefully the signal would look more like the A and B
signal you are showing.

Now the A signal you show would be the result of a DC pulse signal with
a 50% duty cycle.
The B signal would be the output of an AC driven signal.  Now I believe the
efficiency will be more productive than the current line voltages, 50Hz or 60 Hz.

This is just what I think will happen.

I have enough material to build one of these devices and I would like to do that.
I have already been asked to provide screen shots of my testing.
So maybe I will do that with this design either this fall or next spring.

I was going to move on to something else, but I would like to know
if these motionless generator designs benefit from permanent magnets
placed into the designs.  So my PMs need to be easily placed into and
out of the prototype I am building. 

Just one more note:  I believe that if these designs are to work with switching
DC signals, then I need to ground one side of the drive coil and drive the
other side of the coil between  a positive and negative DC voltage.  This
insures the polarity in the core changes direction.  Also make sure the core
does not get saturated with the voltages you use in the design.


When I did testing with a switching positive only signal, then at line voltage
frequencies, 60Hz, I got the best results at lower duty cycles.  With duty cycles
of 50% for efficient results, I had to raise yhe frequency to 600 hz. or higher.

Lunkster
 

Offline truesearch

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #19 on: October 14, 2022, 02:12:37 AM »
@Lunkster,

I'm looking forward to your test results ~ whenever that is.

As a side-note, your development and experiments remind me alot of Flynn's work:
http://www.rexresearch.com/flynn/flynn.htm

Keep us posted.

Offline Lunkster

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #20 on: October 21, 2022, 05:21:57 PM »
Hello,

I am in the process of building the prototype in this post.
The permanent magnets can easily be slid into or out of
place so you can chance the pole positions in the prototype.

1.)  This prototype will allow more balance of the drive current
in the prototype.
2.)  It makes the comparison of having permanent magnets
into and out of the circuit easier.
3.)  It is easy to change permanent magnet poles in the circuit.
4.)  It speeds up the time to get test data.
5.)  This prototype should remove the need for diode in the drive circuit.
6.)  This design could reduce the complexity of the system level design
of the circuit.

Things to consider when building a prototype:
1.)  If the drive and output coils are the same in wire diameter
and number of turns and wire length, then it is easier to
evaluate the performance of the design.
2.)  Testing with different loaded outputs will tell the most
about the performance of the configuration.
3.)  The closer you can match the strength of the permanent
magnets and the strength of the drive coil in the circuit, the
better the results should be in theory.
4.)  The core material and size  need to handle the flux
moving through each path without saturating the core.
5.)  Make sure to have proper protection of the coil wires from
shorting out to the cores.
6.)  The more you can build the sub assemblies as individual
modules, the easier they can be used in other prototype builds.
7.)  protect the core from Eddie currents by laminations or other
techniques in the build of the prototype.

Lunkster

Offline Lunkster

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2022, 05:30:27 PM »
Hello,

The attached file has testing data for the latest
prototype at 60Hz, AC

There is nothing usable at this low of a frequency
for this design.

I found and ordered a 5 connection SSR that has
3 output connections, one is common, one is
normally open and the other is normally closed.

I will try this SSR device to alternate between a
positive and negative DC supply.  I will adjust the
switching frequency to the drive coil and see
what the test results look like.

Lunkster

Offline truesearch

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2022, 10:05:36 PM »
@Lunkster,


That sounds interesting!

And just curious, what SSR did you settle on? What frequency is it good up to?


truesearch

Offline Lunkster

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2022, 03:27:46 PM »
Hello,

I attached the limited information I could on the SSR
I am purchasing.  I could not find the frequency response
of it.  The P/N is BERM-KB25DA.

I was given a the option purchasing a couple of boards
and software to test the prototype that I may look into
it this does not work.  I was hoping I could stay away from
software options.

Lunkster


Offline Lunkster

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #24 on: November 03, 2022, 05:08:43 PM »
Hello,

If you have built a prototype like the last sketch I have
Then I have an interesting test you can try.

I currently do not have a way to do the switching
at the resonant point of my prototype.

It is a long shot, but if it did work then it would be
a great way of harvesting electrical energy through
rerouting the flux flow from permanet magnets.

Question:  Does flux flow?

It seems like it when looking at the operation of a transformer.
It does not seem to, when there needs to be physical
movement between a magnet and a copper coil in order to produce
electrical energy.

Lunkster

Offline Lunkster

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Re: Motionless Switching Magnetosphere Electric Generator
« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2022, 11:14:29 PM »
Hello,

This message is only for the hobbyist.
If you are an engineer or scientist, you already know this stuff.

The signals I show and are talking about show up at the output coil
of my device.

As I have been testing with the prototype, I have learned some things
about switching DC signals that a hobbyist like me did not have
a good understanding of before.

When working with lower switching frequencies, I would have larger
current draws using a 50% duty cycle.  So I would have to lower
the duty cycle in order to lower the current draw of the circuit.
The lower the frequency the shorter the duty cycle needed to be on
my circuit.

The DC pulse I was sending to the circuit acting like a sign wave at the
start of the wave acting like an AC wave.  Then the signal flattens out at
the top of the wave.  It is the flattening part of the signal where the
larger current draw is occurring.  As I raise the switch speed, the flat
area goes away and the signal looks a lot more like an AC sign wave.

I wanted to operate my circuit at a 50% duty cycle.  In order to do this
I had to raise the switching frequency. 

When I switched the DC too fast then the amplitude of the signal decreases
more and more as the frequency goes up in value.  Eventually it flatlines.

So there is one optimal frequency for each circuit configuration.
This may not be the desired frequency that the circuit needs to be operating at.

So this is where I was thinking that you could send a packet of the desired frequency
for the duration of the needed on time of the device.  This should provide an
efficient signal package to the device. 

Now I am assuming a one polarity DC pulse is used in the system.
So the magnitude of the magnetic force changes during the packet
but not the polarity of the magnetic pulse created by the electrical
packet sent to the device.
 
Maybe there is a circuit that already does this in the market.

Lunkster