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Author Topic: Reactive Current - Parallel RCL  (Read 36399 times)

Offline nix85

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Re: Reactive Current - Parallel RCL
« Reply #330 on: December 30, 2021, 05:12:16 PM »
Continuing on the subject of transformers, here is something i shared before but is worth repeating this guy at Quora nicely summed up exactly what happens when secondary is loaded, what is in series what in parallel etc. This is of course not a full explanation of how transformer works, this is just some basic conventional stuff.

A transformer with open secondary is just an inductor. The concept of backEMF makes no sense here. What will happen is the current will lag the voltage by 90° in the ideal case. Power delivered to the inductor is current times voltage. Note that this averages to 0 over any whole cycle when the current and voltage are sines with 90° phase shift between them. Energy is put into the inductor during half the cycle, then given back during the other half. The average power transfer is 0. The energy that is absorbed and then given back is temporarily stored in the magnetic field of the transformer core. In reality, the inductor will not be purely inductive, but will also appear to have some resistance in series with its inductance. That resistance is the DC resistance of the wire the primary coil is made from. That resistance will dissipate power proportional to the square of the current thru it. In a "good" transformer or inductor, this resistance is small compared to the impedance due to the inductance over the frequency range the device is intended to work. Looking at the voltage and current, the current will lag the voltage a little less than 90° due to this resistance. The average of the voltage x current over a whole cycle is now a little positive, which is the energy dissipated by the resistance each cycle. Getting even closer to reality, there will also be some loss in storing then retrieving magnetic energy to/from the transformer core each cycle. This will also appear as a resistive component electrically. The resistance will appear in parallel with the primary inductance. Both together are in series with the DC resistance of the coil.

When a load is connected to the secondary, it looks a lot like the core gets more lossy to the circuit driving the primary. The primary looks more resistive (which means voltage and current are now more in-phase), which accounts for the higher power it now draws at the same voltage.

Like the core loss resistance, this additional resistance appears in parallel with the inductance of the primary, from the point of view of the circuit driving the primary. In a ideal transformer with ideal load, the secondary removes energy from the magnetic core exactly as the primary tries to put it there. The result is the primary current is now in phase with its voltage, and therefore looks purely resistive. This of course never happens exactly because there are always inevitable losses.

In the ideal case, a transformer primary looks like whatever impedance is connected to the secondary, divided by the square of the turns ratio. For example, let's say a transformer has a 1:3 turns ratio. You put 12 VAC into the primary, and ideally get 36V out of the secondary. If there is 10 Ω on the secondary, then it is delivering 36V/10Ω = 130W. This has to go into the primary, which means the primary current is 130W/12V = 10.8A, which means the primary look slike a 12V/10.8A = 1.11 Ω resistor. Note that 1.11Ω / 10Ω = 1/9, which is the square of the turns ratio.

..............

Also...

The magnetizing current is quite small compared to the full load current of the transformer. Magnetizing current remains constant irrespective of secondary load. The magnetizing current lags the voltage by 90 degrees.

Offline nix85

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Re: Reactive Current - Parallel RCL
« Reply #331 on: January 02, 2022, 03:49:46 AM »
In the case you have not seen Etheric Rainmaking by James Constable
it's about time you do

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwhu2G2p2sM

Offline nix85

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Re: Reactive Current - Parallel RCL
« Reply #332 on: January 03, 2022, 06:08:14 PM »
From NEWSPAPER "LA CROIX", one of newspapers that reported the encounter at the time. This is another in a long row of indications of a secret military in this case Russian space program. All reports in the link below.

October 21, 1954, France.

A worker from Saint-Rémy (Vosges), Mr. Ujvari, 40 years old, has just told the gendarmes of Raon-l'Etape that, last Wednesday, around 3 a.m., he was stopped on the road by a stranger of large build and average height, wearing a gray jacket, decorated on the shoulders with shiny badges.

The man spoke an unknown language. Mr. Ujvari, of Czech nationality, tried to speak Russian. His interlocutor understood it perfectly. "Where am I, he asked, in Italy, in Spain?" He then inquired about the distance separating him from the German border, and the time. The worker having told him that it was around 3:30 a.m., the man took out of his jacket a watch that marked 4 a.m.

Then the stranger gave the worker the order to move forward. Soon Ujvari saw in the middle of the road a craft in the shape of two plates reversed one against the other, from which emerged a kind of periscope.

Arrived at about thirty meters from the apparatus, which was about 1.50 high and 2.50 m. wide, the stranger tells him to move away. But, looking back from time to time, Mr. Ujvari varies could see the machine rise slowly vertically with a noise of sewing machines. Arrived at an altitude of 500 meters, it took the horizontal and disappeared in direction of the south.

Mr. Ujvari said the unknown was wearing a helmet similar to that of a motorcyclist. He had a gun in his hand.

His last word to Mr. Ujvari was "farewell" in Russian.

https://ufologie.patrickgross.org/1954/21oct1954saintremy.htm


Offline nix85

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Re: Reactive Current - Parallel RCL
« Reply #333 on: January 20, 2022, 05:41:26 AM »
Little more valuable info on the transformer as constant flux device, what exactly happens, in short due to counter flux developed by the secondary (lenz), overall flux in the core drops, since voltage across the primary is due to inductive reactance (V=IZ) it falls too, new created difference between the source voltage and voltage across the primary cause the rise of current until flux and voltage across the primary are restored (almost) to original value (not exactly since full load flux in the core is slightly LESS than no load flux).

https://www.myelectrical2015.com/2017/10/transformer-on-load.html