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Author Topic: spin theory  (Read 14366 times)

Offline raburgeson

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spin theory
« on: April 08, 2005, 12:50:04 AM »
If the output wave is the exact oppisite of the input wave why does the
Electron move?These 2 forces being in balance would not provide push
to keep the electron in orbit. I agree to the proposed intersection of
electronmagnetic at r0 but the continuous thurst suggests these forces
are not equal.I'm not all that chucked over the present vector formula
used either

PaulLowrance

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Re: spin theory
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2005, 12:59:47 AM »
Are you referring to quantum waves or perhaps quantum spherical waves?

Offline raburgeson

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Re: spin theory
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2005, 02:29:04 AM »
Yes elecromagnetic waves, It all fits except the push to make the electron orbit.
It also points to a theory that didn't make it that tried to define quarks in
catagories of colors, flavors, and animals- as harmonics could make atoms act
like certin areas on it had unque properties.

PaulLowrance

  • Guest
Re: spin theory
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2005, 04:46:57 PM »
I'm a firm believer that elements are not particles, but rather standing waves in space / aether.  Science has known for long time that electrons don't really circle to atom, as least not in 3D space.  I'm definitely not an authority on this topic, but Milo Wolff is.  You might enjoy his theories:

His articles:
http://www.quantummatter.com
Also scroll down near bottom to see the animated wave action of an Electron.

A few articles are:
http://www.quantummatter.com/body_spin.html
http://www.quantummatter.com/PNASLast.html
http://www.quantummatter.com/body_point.html

Sincerely,
Paul

Offline raburgeson

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Re: spin theory
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2005, 01:27:05 AM »
Well all of the early 20th century scientist say the spin is cause by a vortex. I'm still trying to
figure out how the vortex works exactly. And am curious why antimatter isn't more abundant.
The nuculii has to have more intersections than the electron and as the whole universe can't
rotate around every atom in it, the energy for the vortex must come from the protons and
neutrons (probably their R0) , but, have been unable to find proof of this in anyones theorys.

Offline TechStuf

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    • Biblical Record Proves True
Re: spin theory
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2005, 10:16:08 PM »
Spin theory....what's that?? ?I was under the impression from CNN,ABC,CBS,NBC.....that it was an advanced science by now!

Heck, George's Washington and Orwell have been doing it for years!


Seriously though,

After receiving a free copy of George Bugh's book on spin wave tech....I was certainly left wanting, and wasn't expecting basically a hurried collection of forum posts.

I have been provided with more insights from Callum Coat's exhaustive work on the life and research of Schauberger: "Living Energies".


Peace,

Techstuf


I can tell you one thing.....I am sure that I'm not the only who feels like one of various projectiles in a particle accelerator....there is a rumbling....an accelerated coming together which just may produce a new 'spin' on an old question:

"What's the matter?"



« Last Edit: April 14, 2005, 10:35:20 PM by TechStuf »