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2nd "law" violations => Heat to electric energy conversion => Topic started by: geptole on September 11, 2020, 10:45:54 PM

Title: negative temperature (kelvin)
Post by: geptole on September 11, 2020, 10:45:54 PM
(I am italian, so it has been translated by google chrome)

Normally the peltier cell (used to exploit the seebeck effect) works like this ...
In the Peltier cell there are 2 floors: one floor goes into the hot zone and the other floor goes into the cold zone.
Usually the top to be placed in the cold area is the one with the initials written on it while the other top where nothing is written rests on the warm part.
The difference in temperature generates electricity.
The trouble is that the principles of thermodynamics establish that the heat goes towards the cold and never contrary, this means that from the outside I have to pump and spend energy to maintain the temperature difference.
But in the negative temperature system the heat does not go towards the cold and on the contrary the cold goes towards the colder area, increasing the intensity of cold, and at the same time the heat goes towards the warmer area, increasing the temperature even more than before. , so there is no need to spend energy to maintain the temperature difference.
Once the device is started, the temperature difference remains forever and without expending energy, so the peltier cell continues indefinitely to deliver electricity without ever stopping.

To start the device you need a laser: it is true that the laser absorbs energy (and even a lot) but once started we can turn off the laser and draw infinite energy from the Peltier cell, for its natural life.
Title: Re: negative temperature (kelvin)
Post by: AllanV on September 14, 2020, 05:05:21 AM
(I am italian, so it has been translated by google chrome)

Normally the peltier cell (used to exploit the seebeck effect) works like this ...
In the Peltier cell there are 2 floors: one floor goes into the hot zone and the other floor goes into the cold zone.
Usually the top to be placed in the cold area is the one with the initials written on it while the other top where nothing is written rests on the warm part.
The difference in temperature generates electricity.
The trouble is that the principles of thermodynamics establish that the heat goes towards the cold and never contrary, this means that from the outside I have to pump and spend energy to maintain the temperature difference.
But in the negative temperature system the heat does not go towards the cold and on the contrary the cold goes towards the colder area, increasing the intensity of cold, and at the same time the heat goes towards the warmer area, increasing the temperature even more than before. , so there is no need to spend energy to maintain the temperature difference.
Once the device is started, the temperature difference remains forever and without expending energy, so the peltier cell continues indefinitely to deliver electricity without ever stopping.

To start the device you need a laser: it is true that the laser absorbs energy (and even a lot) but once started we can turn off the laser and draw infinite energy from the Peltier cell, for its natural life.

Hi,

Would this cool a fridge? Sounds good but how does the laser start the effect. The light could stay on in the fridge continuously.

Allan
Title: Re: negative temperature (kelvin)
Post by: geptole on September 14, 2020, 09:48:23 AM
Yes !
It is a refrigerator!
But it is a special refrigerator that when fully operational does not demand energy, and indeed provides it.
It is the most exaggerated refrigerator in the world.

But the light bulb must stay outside the refrigerator.

The entropy of the universe is increasing more and more and sooner or later it will become maximum, when this happens strange things will happen.

It is possible to anticipate those strange things.

https://www.mpg.de/research/negative-absolute-temperature (https://www.mpg.de/research/negative-absolute-temperature)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_temperature (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_temperature)