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Author Topic: Stator reconfiguration motor  (Read 928 times)

Offline Lunkster

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Stator reconfiguration motor
« on: August 17, 2020, 08:22:33 PM »
What the Stator reconfiguration motor does is to create electromechanical movement in magnetic motors without hitting a sticky point.  So you can have an all permanent magnet rotor and a stator built with 50% permanent magnets.  The magnetism between the rotor and stator will move the rotor so far until it would hit a sticky point, but what happens instead is that an electromagnet(most likely air core) would energize and it would operate with the flux of an adjacent permanent magnet.  The permanent magnet and electromagnet become one functional magnet.  This functional magnet will move the rotor farther along.  After it reaches a certain position, the electromagnet is turned off so that the air core electromagnet disappears from the functioning magnetic motor.  The adjacent magnet will now move more.  This whole process repeats itself with the next set of magnets. So you get torque from a ratio of three permanent magnets to one electromagnet.  This design should be more efficient that conventional electric or magnetic motors.  I have electrical circuits that can recover the electrical energy used in the electromagnet to make the motor even more efficient.  If you power an electromagnet with 50% of recovered power along with 50% new power, the overall efficiency of the system would be great.