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News announcements and other topics => News => Topic started by: Paul-R on August 09, 2020, 11:27:06 PM

Title: Beirut Explosion. Can Ammonium Nitrate, an oxidiser, behave like that?
Post by: Paul-R on August 09, 2020, 11:27:06 PM
Ammonium Nitrate, NH4NO3, can be unstable and "go off", turning from a heavy dense powder into gases of considerable volume, thereby having some explosive force..
To be used as an explosive, it needs a fuel, carbon, sugar, oil etc., to convert into vast quantities of CO2, producing massive pressure. In the (apparent) absense of such fuel, could ammonium nitrate on its own produce the effect we see?
Title: Re: Beirut Explosion. Can Ammonium Nitrate, an oxidiser, behave like that?
Post by: MasterPlaster on August 10, 2020, 08:35:23 AM
This was an act of terrorism and long in planning. Ammonium Nitrate is just as responsible as the planes were in 9/11.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8noI6JOOSZI&feature=youtu.be&t=128
Title: Re: Beirut Explosion. Can Ammonium Nitrate, an oxidiser, behave like that?
Post by: sm0ky2 on August 13, 2020, 05:20:53 AM
When mixed with a Borohydrate and dry-ice,
Large quantities of Hydrogen gas are released
That is what is responsible for the filmed explosion.
Not just hydrogen, but there must also have been a large supply of oxygen

Title: Re: Beirut Explosion. Can Ammonium Nitrate, an oxidiser, behave like that?
Post by: Paul-R on August 13, 2020, 12:20:28 PM
When mixed with a Borohydrate and dry-ice,
Large quantities of Hydrogen gas are released
That is what is responsible for the filmed explosion.
How do you know this?