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Author Topic: Is the KICK a shockwave ?  (Read 12140 times)

Offline Grumpy

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2006, 04:15:32 PM »
Rogue waves - hmm

Read up on Dirac's Delta function.  Pulse of infinite peak, minimal width, and infinite harmonics - literally all hell breaking loose in the EM field.

The shockwave is produced by the sudden cut off of electrical energy.  The pulse is going somewhere - it must return to a state of balance - so it is released as radiant energy - we just intercept it with a collector.  This primary electric field is not conservative and does not have to be.   This is not the A-Field that everyone hears about, but the Phi field.  It is electrostatic in nature, and creates the other fields A, E, and B.

In a toriod coil, B is trapped in the core, E is in the wire, and A goes through the middle, phi is integrated over the toroidal surface perpendicular to the wire.  So, when you stop the pulse, it comes out perpendicular to the wire, as phi.

There are many ways to wind a coil...

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2006, 04:15:32 PM »

HMM

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2006, 11:47:25 PM »
When you say that two electrons are made to collide.  "quantum entanglement"

have a look here:  www.physicsforums.com/archive/index.php/t-9075.html

Offline lightbody

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2007, 05:06:11 AM »
Thanks particularly to Grumpy. Do you have any refrences for me to look up, hard-copy or otherwise? I like your explaination of the various fields because it is visual. Are there any drawings/animations that I could look at to see what you are talking about with the phi field..etc? That brings up a good issue. Is there anyone around who would care to put pictures to the Mark TPU...an animation that shows what you think is happening?
  Yes. I think I understand a little better now. When the ground connection is interrupted the traveling wave in the wire (current) stops and has to change into something else in order to conserve it's energy. If it changes into an electrostatic field, how would you re-convert that back to another traveling wave in another coil? -anyone?
  If not converted into an electrostatic field (i may have mistaken what you were saying) then perhaps it changes into another type of traveling wave...such as a longitudinal EM wave (a so-called 'scalar'... a crapy name for these waves IMO). If that needs to be re-converted into a transverse wave in order to come out as useable current in the secondary coil(s), then there may be some hint as to how that happens in these classic vids
http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=longitudinal+electricity
 
  Is that what's going on in a TPU?

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2007, 05:06:11 AM »
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Offline Grumpy

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2007, 09:10:03 AM »
Basic electrodynamics.  I am not an expert of any sort.   I just tinker and ask the right questions.

The phi field seeks balance, not conservation.  As it must.

It does not change into something else, it returns from which it came.  The collector just intercepts it.

When an electric field is put in motion (phi) it creates a current (A).   Fields E and B are secondary - like a biproduct or after effect.

Transverse wave can not propogate outside a medium - must be longitudinal - per Tesla.


Just thinking out loud...


Offline lightbody

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TPU flyback inductance and longitudinal
« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2007, 09:57:04 AM »
Ok. Ok. Well, The heroic moderator has provided links for me to look at, and I finally groked them (thank you). The flyback impulse would surely occure in a fast switched dc coil. But, that could not be the source of any OU as far as I can tell. What it does is it jacks up the voltage in a transient spike.
 Fine. Now, smash two of these spikes together in a destructive interfearance (E-fields bucking) may produce a strong longitudinal wave radiating out from the primary. I hate to invoke him, but Bearden says that whenever you buck electric or magnetic field pulses, a longitudinal 'scalar' radiates away. If that is of high enough voltage/frequency, then is 'shakes the ether'. So, smashing to opposing transient spikes together may be a convienent way to get a high frequency/voltage scalar radiations...another way than T. patent in the boarderlands vids. i refered to.
  Shakeing the ether...to me that means coupling to the vacume energy density VED, and THAT is something I could see producing OU. I don't want to do this, but I have to envoke exotic effects to justify OU in this case. I think that there are longitudinal waves that reach at least 100% the local perception of the speed of light...and thus couple to the fundamental frequency of VED. I (cringe) also think that the VED (call it the ether or aether if you like) may be actually what we would percieve as a 'superluminal' field. Think of it as an electrostatic field vibrating at superluminal frequencies.
  What I'm saying is that a longitudinal ripple (shock wave) of sufficient voltage and frequency may exceed the local speed barrier of light, and thus tap into and break the equillibrium of the VED...that would create current where there was only voltage...it's like getting an electrostatic field to discharge as an arc.
  So, the flyback transformer spike that creates an arc in a spark gap would be a low voltage/frequency version of a TPU...which does the same thing, only at much higher voltages/frequencies. The "gap" the speed of light...and the arc is the discharge of the VED. It's a two-stage transient spike generator. I guess. 

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TPU flyback inductance and longitudinal
« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2007, 09:57:04 AM »
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Offline Grumpy

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #20 on: January 01, 2007, 03:53:28 PM »
"Pulse transformers" are a common means to produce pulses.  Lots of noise coming out with the spike - rings like hell after it.

Offline lightbody

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2007, 08:34:28 AM »
  Yea, that is where the high frequency part comes in. The harmonics are really screaming - probably would scope as a high amplitude, short duration square wave. They (the harmonics) are only part of the signal, and the higher up you go the weaker they become, but they are there.
  You might be able to jack up the frequency of a normal batterie's input signal so as to light a incandescant bulb with very low current (see below). It's possible that is all that's happening in the video. It's hard to meter the acutal power that its putting out.
  Still, just assuming that is not it...they way to explain any OU would probably involve sucking current out of the ambient VED (ether). It's got a lot of normal components, and nothing strange like really high freq. equip, but that doesn't mean something strange can't be happening.
  He talks about the main coil possibly getting overly hot. So, that would likey not be a problem of normal resistance (ohmic heating). He seems visably concerned about the heat...which may indicate that this is a flyback pulse transformer, which in prolonged operation would develop hysteresis from the 'bouncing/reflecting' spikes as they change direction. Since it's also bumping up the frequency by introducing a lot of signal distortion (harmonics), then there would be eddy current losses from skin effect, and that would also produce heat.
  Since no one can tell exactly how the coils are wound we have a real problem figureing out exactly what the heck the TPU is doing. I'm sorry to be so theorhetical about it, and not suggesting a configuration to try (typical annyoing newbie).
  My best guess is that it's operating as a tesla-type longitudinal wave oscillator, and that he's figured out a way to create the waves without special high frequency equipment, and is catching the OU current from the disturbed ether in his secondary(s). If that is the case it would be worth it to watch these in full, and even perhaps try a reproduction..
http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=longitudinal+electricity&hl=en
  there may be a clue to the winding of his coils somewhere in the device explained in the vids above. if it's working on the same L-wave principle. Also, I may be totally wrong about the whole 'ether' aspect of it as even tesla liked to say that his L-wave power transformers/generators were interacting with the earth's fields instead of some more fundamental 'weelwork of nature'.

 Devils Advocate:
That's all based on the asumption that it's not just a really inefficeint high frequency inverter/converter that is capable of lighting a bulb with very low power due to high frequency characteristics. There are some battery powered, small high freq. dc sources out there that will probably light incandescent bulbs with small batteries, small enough to fit in his device, like these...
http://www.blazelabs.com/e-exp03.asp
  SM may have found a way to make one like these long before anyone else. But, I would like to belive otherwise and just stick to tesla's L. wave principle.

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2007, 08:34:28 AM »
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Offline Grumpy

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #22 on: January 02, 2007, 03:54:03 PM »
The clamp meter indicates that a strong varying magnetic field is in the center of the TPU.

Tesla experienced a strong physical heating effect when using a certain range of pulse widths - 100 micro-second duration - or maybe it was 1 micro-second.  Anyway, beyond this he found a cooling effect at shorter durations.

It is my understanding that the TPU can literally burn up due to this heat.  I hope that I can duplicate the cool electricity that Tesla found with shorter pulse widths.


Tesla was very adament about the pulses not reversing - no reverse current.  Like a ram jet - just keeps the flow going and never lets up.


There are many many ways to wind the coils - naturally some will be better than others.

Start with this:  when the signal is abruptly stopped in the wire - the radiant energy is released out of the wire in all directions perpendicular to the wire.  This RE impinges on a conductor and imparts a charge to it.  Turbo explained this pretty well before he went quiet.  So, as you can see, the configuration that everyone is following is not the only one that will work.

With the Dirac Delta Function, the frequency view looks like spikes approaching infinity.  The time view looks like an almost infinite square wave.  Like a DC component with hash on top. (sound familiar?)

 

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