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Solid States Devices => solid state devices => Topic started by: Fysikk on December 16, 2018, 05:39:30 PM

Title: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: Fysikk on December 16, 2018, 05:39:30 PM
Hi

I tested acrylic paint (dielectric) between two button
neodymium magnets with nickel coating !!

Reading from the multimeter :

I measured a dc voltage of 15 mV !!

Voltage goes down due to bad dielectric !!

Sincerly - Kai
Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: F6FLT on December 16, 2018, 06:24:24 PM
How long time? Current in a load?
Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: ayeaye on December 16, 2018, 06:56:04 PM
Mmmm, nickel coating, capacitor... You didn't touch the probes when measuring?

Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: Fysikk on December 16, 2018, 07:07:45 PM
Mmmm, nickel coating, capacitor... You didn't touch the probes when measuring?

Hi i did not touch the probes !!

Sincerly - Kai Anders Wold
Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: Fysikk on December 16, 2018, 07:17:08 PM
How long time? Current in a load?

Hi the voltage did only last a short amount of time !!

Check out the attached image of calculated current !!

I just discovered that the voltage had gone up to 50 mV
after the acrylic paint has dryed out !!

Calculator image updated !!

Sincerly - Kai Anders Wold

Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: F6FLT on December 16, 2018, 09:38:44 PM
Hi the voltage did only last a short amount of time !!

Check out the attached image of calculated current !!

I just discovered that the voltage had gone up to 50 mV
after the acrylic paint has dryed out !!

Calculator image updated !!

Sincerly - Kai Anders Wold

Maybe a little electret effect?
You could try without magnetic material but with the same metal, for example with two pieces of nickel if your magnets were neodynium coated with nickel.



Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: Fysikk on December 16, 2018, 10:26:02 PM
Hi

I have updated the first post with the magnet type !!

Update :

I have tested two steel plates with zinc coating and acrylic paint
between the plates :

I got no voltage but :

One side (Positive polarity)
Other side (Negative polarity)

I checked that on multimeter display !!

It does matter if i switch multimeter sticks
when measuring on the steel plates !!

It does look like that i only get a voltage if
the dielectric contain some water...

Sincerly - Kai Anders Wold
Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: ayeaye on December 17, 2018, 04:10:14 AM
When you short the capacitance, never touch anything, how much time it takes to get 50 mV?

Everything may matter, all has to be described. Neodymium magnets covered with nickel right? Acrylic paint between them, likely a thin layer, it matters that it's a thin layer. Is the air ionized, was there a thunder storm, everything matters.

See my post there, the wrapped magnet that i made  https://overunity.com/18026/a-treatise-on-the-magnetic-vector-potential-and-the-marinov-generator/30/ . Hell i may be stupid, are neodymium magnets covered with nickel? I maybe didn't need all that effort of covering it with insulating tape, and then wrapping it into aluminum foil, though it was not difficult to do. Maybe i could measure directly on it, if it is coated with nickel, i don't know what it is coated with. But then it may matter that it's a thick conductor where are a lot of electrons, it may even matter what metal it is made of. This generated a small current when in series with my body, and likely not for galvanic reasons. I cannot explain that, the same as you cannot explain your result, and maybe they are somehow related, maybe not. There are still things that we cannot exactly explain.

This drawing i made with Inkscape, everyone learn to use it, very nice thing. And often only drawing can show what you exactly did. Well, and to confirm that not only you do stupid experiments :)

Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: Fysikk on December 21, 2018, 06:17:48 PM
Hi :

I tested two button magnets with
homemade Playdoh clay between !!

Reading on multimeter :
50 to 71 mV DC Voltage !!

Voltage is more stable ...

Sincerly - Kai Anders Wold

Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: ayeaye on December 22, 2018, 08:47:39 AM
I guess it needs electrons. But in time it might be able to gather them enough from the air or such, so over time some voltage gathers to the capacitance.

It is how it might be, in theory, a magnet creates a vortex of electrons in the metal wrapping, or coating. This is a current, and may fill a capacitance. But this may need electrons, from the air, from the ground, or from a large metal body

Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: ayeaye on December 22, 2018, 07:49:14 PM
Fysikk, i cannot replicate your results. I made two "wrapped magnets", of 3 ceramic magnets 1 inch in diameter and 5 mm thick, wrapped into aluminum foil. Between these wrapped magnets was a thin insulating tape. The wrapped magnets attracted each other. After 5 minutes i momentarily measured 0.5 mV between these wrapped magnets, i saw no voltage after i discharged the capacitance. This result is insignificant, however, considering all the static electricity that could been around.

Or did your magnets repulse each other?

Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: Fysikk on December 22, 2018, 08:12:47 PM
Hi :

The magnets are not supposed to be wrapped
in aluminium foil and you need to use a layer of
of dried acrylic paint or homemade play-doh
clay between the two magnets attracting each other !!

Measure the dc voltage after assembly !!

Note use one stick on each magnet !!

Sincerly - Kai Anders Wold
Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: ayeaye on December 22, 2018, 08:18:37 PM
I only have ceramic disc magnets which don't conduct electricity. The only way to emulate your experiment is to wrap them into aluminum foil.

I don't say that you effect is not there, i just say that nothing is yet certain. Be careful also, the voltages are very small, everything like slight differences in the alloys of nickel can create battery with certain substances between the magnets.

Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: Fysikk on January 10, 2019, 05:02:02 PM
I have made a magnetic capacitor Version 2.0 :

Third charge up test :

I used a AA Battery again in the third test !!

The third charge up failed ..

Updated :

It turns out that the magnetic capacitor only charges up
if the dielectric glue between the plates is wet !!

Check out the enclosed image …

Sincerly - Kai Anders Wold
Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: ayeaye on January 10, 2019, 05:05:27 PM
Your device is not even a capacitor, or i don't know. The neodymium ring magnet may be covered with nickel, and this conducts electricity. Is your ceramic magnet thicker than the ring magnet or not, you didn't describe it properly, so impossible to decide whether it is even a capacitor. The same as your previous experiment, some paints may conduct electricity.

In case if it is not a capacitor, please measure the current through it, but don't touch it with fingers. And don't charge it with any battery. I want to know, whether these two metals, nickel and copper, may provide the electrons or whatever, the same as my body in my experiment with a hard disk magnet and my body in series. Thanks.

Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: Fysikk on January 10, 2019, 05:13:53 PM
Hi

The drawing of the magnetic capacitor is correct !!

The size of the device is 27 mm diameter and 9 mm thickness.

Sincerly - Kai Anders Wold
Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: skywatcher on January 11, 2019, 07:41:59 PM
You almost always get some millivolts if you put some wet material between two plates of metal, even if you use the same metal on both sides.Theoretically there should be no galvanic effects, but this applies only if both electrodes are 100% identical which is never the case.If you only touch them with your fingers they are 'contaminated' and might have different electrical properties.
Voltage alone means nothing. It's only interesting if you can draw significant amounts of current.
Title: Re: Magnetic Capacitor Experiment
Post by: ayeaye on January 11, 2019, 09:41:32 PM
Yes, and the other thing is thermocouple, which can also provide a small amount of current. I cannot exclude that this is the reason in my case. All these things have to be separately measured and subtracted to get real results.

Title: Selfcharging Battery 1.0 experiment
Post by: Fysikk on February 04, 2019, 03:15:35 PM
Here is my selfcharging battery 1.0 :

The battery charges up when not connected to multimeter !!

When measuring intial voltage (650-850 mV) it drops down rapidly !!

Silicone is charging up the ceramic magnet (Iron Oxides).

Check out the image for battery experiment details !!

Sincerly - Kai Anders Wold