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Mechanical free energy devices => mechanic => Topic started by: SkyWatcher123 on August 11, 2018, 07:18:43 AM

Title: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 11, 2018, 07:18:43 AM
Hi all, have been wanting to experiment more with mechanical devices, like I used to in the past.

I think the magnets rotating can be of benefit.
So, I am going to work with the ideas shared by Patrick Kelly, based on the anonymous inventor from South Africa.
What i have so far, is what I have on hand, will need to wind more coils though.
Starting out with the 12 strand, 24awg. magnet wire coil, not twisted with ferrite tube core.
Rotor has 1" diameter by 1/8" thick magnet on each end, total of 4 neo magnets.I am using a 400 size rc brushless outboard motor as the bearing and support structure for the rotor.
I removed the small neo magnets from the outboard casing of the motor, using a lighter to soften the glue holding the magnets, so now the rotor can spin freely.
Here is picture of what I have built so far, need to wire up the bedini type circuit for motor pulse action and other components.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Q6NA5N6ioU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Q6NA5N6ioU)
http://www.free-energy-info.com/Rotary.pdf (http://www.free-energy-info.com/Rotary.pdf)
peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 13, 2018, 10:37:03 PM
Hi all, I had to modify the setup a bit, because the motor i was using for the rotor support structure and bearing, the bearings were bad.
It is now smooth and quiet and runs well.Using a 3 cell parallel pack of lithium ion cells for 4 volts input.


Have another identical battery pack as the charge battery.Using the basic circuit diagram shown in the pdf.

Still testing with just the 12 strand coil and ferrite core, will be adding more separate, single strand coils later, will have 4 total.peace love light  :) 
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 15, 2018, 06:35:05 PM
Hi all, the testing is looking very interesting so far.
I switched to 12 volt tractor batteries for testing and the results so far are looking promising.
The other smaller, longer coil on the right in the setup, is not being used at the moment, it is 7 strand 24awg. coil, though it does help balance out the rotor from vibrations.
So far, the input side is actually gaining a little voltage after every test run and the charge side charges very well.
The batteries are meant to swap positions.Questions or comments welcome, shall continue testing.peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: forest on August 15, 2018, 07:54:58 PM
You can use old hard drive. It has excellent bearings, though I don't know how to safely glue magnets to the hdd plate
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aldex on August 15, 2018, 10:57:19 PM
I registered on the site to follow up on your work. I've been struggling with energizers for some time but so far no really satisfying results. I have a certain difficulty in this project that when other collector coils are placed the rotor slows down a lot.
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 15, 2018, 11:16:45 PM
Hi forest, I've never used a hard drive bearing, though I guess the inventor is using that in one of the device versions.


The rc brushless motor with magnets removed, is working just fine with this type and size of rotor.

Are you planning on testing this setup forest, or have built something similar.

peace love light :) 
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 16, 2018, 07:49:19 AM
Hi aldex, thanks for the reply, I didn't realize you posted.
I'm not sure what setup you are using, are you using this circuit I posted.


Maybe if you share details of what you have, we can figure out what is happening in your setup.

As far as rpm, mine starts out slower after swapping, then picks up to a good speed as the charge battery goes above 13 volts.

As for this circuit, the inventor said specifically, it is better to have lower rpm's, as it is more efficient that way.

I've been running this setup for at least 10 hours so far, swapped 4 times and the input side is always equal or a little above the original start resting voltage, after resting a little.

The charge side is well above the voltage of whichever battery is currently on the charge side, taken note of before starting these tests.

The average input power being used is 3.2 watts.

I have not tried placing a 12 volt load yet where the inventor suggests, still observing the behavior of this setup and it seems promising.

If you analyze this circuit, it can be seen, that power is returned to the input battery by generator action using the 1n5408 diode across collector and emitter and that it is configured as a typical boost converter for the charging side.

I also think generator action may be happening through the flyback diodes, when the rotor approaches, it couples with the input battery voltage and the induced coil voltage and gives even more charging to charge side.
peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aldex on August 16, 2018, 02:32:32 PM
Hi, I'm currently running some tests with a 5-wire coil in tests. at first I used some of 3 wires being 2 awg23 and 1 awg26. which I realized that the anergy of the return of the wrist actually returns in the 2 wires but they are the same energy. if I take the 3 filament and put to recharge the primary battery I verified that it really returns a little charge to the primary battery and putting 4 batteries in the output adding the 48v as demonstrated in one of the schemes of this project I saw that the 4 receive also a little energy. so that the first one that moves the circuit can not recharge the other 4. But that was just a test. Now I started to use one with 5 wires being 2 awg 23, 2 awg26 and one I think awg 28. 2 wires equal to the bedini of 850 laps and the other 3 with 1000 laps. what I saw is that the same thing happens with the 3-wire. the energy pulsates at all but the return is the same. I started the tests on Monday and this week put the photos for you to see. the rotor I am using is a wheel of 12 ferrite magnets and I am using the tip3055 transistor. I have other transistors for testing. But I could not put collector coils in any way without the rotor dragging. Let's talk and thank you for sharing your findings.
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 16, 2018, 07:15:42 PM
Hi aldex, thanks for the reply and information, I'm glad to talk with you.

There is nothing wrong with the rotor dragging, inventor makes a point of that, this is not a speed up under load device.
And I see no reason to put meters everywhere, trying to check power.


All I'm doing at the moment, is observing the wheel rotor doing work, by continuously rotating.


Then when the input side reaches around 12.40 volts, I let batteries rest an hour at least, then check voltages and the input side voltage is always equal to or a little greater than when I started these tests, and the charge side is well above the initial rest voltages.

The fact the battery voltages are not reducing, is very interesting.
Keep in mind, I'm using just the one 12 strand coil, with a ferrite tube core, so the core causes no drag.
Whereas, an iron core will cause unwanted drag.
peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: shylo on August 16, 2018, 07:44:12 PM
Hi

I've done alot of runs with batteries, one thing you should be weary of is, although a battery can show voltage gain,it's capacity to deliver gets weaker the longer it runs.
Eventually it goes dead.
Just what I've seen so far.
artv
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: Low-Q on August 16, 2018, 08:03:52 PM
This experiment is so basic, and known, that I cannot imagine it will work as an over unity machine. It is essentially spinning magnets and coils. What can possibly make this device different from a normal generator?


Vidar
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 16, 2018, 10:30:37 PM
Hi all, I'm still testing this setup variant, it is not exactly the same as the south african setup.

Hi shylo, thanks for the reply, I'm aware of what you say and have run many similar devices as well.


What i can say so far, this is performing different. The voltage keeps increasing on the charging side for every swap cycle and I'm draining the input side to the same level every time, specifically to 12.35 volts and the run time is also increasing in every cycle phase.

Hi low-q, thank you for your reply, I'm also aware this type of setup is common, look at the circuit drawing I posted, it's not exactly the same as most I've seen or tried.

Also, what can possibly make this different you say, well I always think about a gasoline engine car, if the timing is off, that car is barely moving.


Maybe it's similar to that, if things are not setup within a certain window of design, most will not see anything out of the normal.


Not that I'm saying this is operating out of the norm, though it is looking interesting and I'm just sharing my observations thus far, not making claims.
peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aldex on August 17, 2018, 03:08:26 AM
Hi, keep testing and posting your experiences. Years ago I tried to replicate some energizers and you are making me continue testing. There is no impossibility until we find the end of the possible. which I particularly do not believe they have found
 ;)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 17, 2018, 05:43:06 PM
Hi aldex, thanks for the positive reply.

I will indeed continue testing, as the results are still encouraging.

I am now officially keeping track of data, since the results continue to be positive.

Total run time has been around 15 hours at around 3.2 watts input.

Of the two 12 volt tractor batteries, one started with 12.56 volts and the other started with 12.55 volts before starting this testing.

The overnight rest voltage on the most recent input side batteries is 12.57 volts.

The overnight rest voltage on the most recent charge side battery is 12.70 volts.

At around 48 watt hours used so far, one of these batteries should have dropped in voltage by now, but that is not what is being observed.

Each of these 235 cold cranking amps tractor batteries has around 12-13 amp hours capacity.

Shall continue testing and documenting the results.

peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: shylo on August 18, 2018, 11:40:07 AM
Skywatcher

You show 11 strands paralleled, couldn't you just use a single strand of a heavier guage?
Not trying to discourage.
Your work and sharing is greatly appreciated.
Thanks  artv
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 18, 2018, 02:50:25 PM
Hi all, Hi shylo, thanks for the reply, are you going to experiment with this setup.

Yes it is 11 strands and 1 strand for feedback, using it because I have it on hand from that previous project.


I assume a single strand will work, since the original south african developer used 21 awg. single strand in all coils in the most preferred version.

I have to go for a couple of days, though I have a small data sheet already, will continue testing when I get back.

Here is the data so far, realize, The setup has already been running for at least 15 hours previous to this data sheet.

Quote
South african self powered generator test using two 12 volt tractor batteries.
Using only one coil/core at the moment, 12 strand 24awg., ferrite tube core.
1 kohm base resistor, TIP3055, 1n5408 diodes for base to emitter and collector to emitter,
2 parallel MUR460 flyback diodes.
3-1/2" diameter rotor using 1" diameter by 1/8" thick neo magnets, 4 total, one per 90 degree position.
=========================================================================================================

Have already made at least 5 battery position swaps and at least 15 hours run time.
Input power from input side 12 volt battery is around 3.23 watts,
or .26 Amps at 12.435 volts average or 48.45 watt hours so far.

Each battery, Battery A and Battery B, one had 12.55 resting volts at very start of these tests
and battery B had 12.56 resting volts at the very start.

Continuation of testing now documented - Test Battery Swap #6:
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Battery A overnight rest voltage = 12.57 volts
Battery B overnight rest voltage = 12.70 volts

End loaded voltage charge side Battery A = 13.40 volts
End loaded voltage input side  Battery B = 12.35 volts

Run time for test #6 = 4 hours 24 minutes


Test Battery Swap #7:
------------------------------------------------------------------
Battery B 1 hour rest voltage = 12.56 volts
Battery A 1 hour rest voltage = 12.75 volts

End loaded voltage charge side Battery B = 13.14 volts
End loaded voltage input side  Battery A = 12.35 volts just blip to 12.34 volts

Run time for test #7 = 3 hours 17 minutes


Test Battery Swap #8, This test will continue when I return home
------------------------------------------------------------------
Battery A overnight rest voltage = 12.57 volts
Battery B overnight rest voltage = 12.695 volts

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aldex on August 19, 2018, 04:29:34 AM
Hi, I've done some tests regarding the charge output for a secondary battery. It's not a circuit that meets your eyes. There's an old story about what I'd like you to read. In this matter has 3 very simple schemes to put in the recharge. Good luck with the tests and keep posting. Force
http://www.thetruthdenied.com/news/2014/03/12/radiant-a-suppressed-fast-battery-charger/

I know that in relation to the project is not directly a radiant charger but the pulses cause this problem in the secondary battery.
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 20, 2018, 06:07:18 AM
Hi aldex, I'm back, thanks for the reply.

Yes, I've worked on the stingo circuit previously, it is a nice charger.

Though the device being worked on in this thread, will not cause fluffy surface charge in any of the batteries, If that is what you are alluding to.

Any flyback voltage is coupled with the input side battery, same as boost converter and this gives the higher current charging, also generator action in coil caused by rotor magnets is coupling with input battery and giving charge to charging side also.

I have continued testing.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 21, 2018, 05:51:22 AM
Hi all, I'm starting a new test, charged one of the batteries up a little, didn't need much anyway, because this setup does not seem to drain the batteries at all.

I was fiddling with adding the other coil and wired the feedback wire wrong and caused large current draws for a bit that would skew my long test run, so I'm restarting it.

Also changed the transistor to an NTE331 NPN, it has a little higher gain and I have the input tuned to around .340 Amps

Will be sharing the data, as I collect it.
Will be adding things to the setup after this testing.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 22, 2018, 09:04:29 PM
Hi all, just a small progress update.

It seems the tuning of the feedback motor trigger coil circuit, needs to be tuned correctly, or the primary coil will most likely oscillate when we don't want it to or not give optimum charging efficiency.

This may cause increased input and the self sustaining battery charging will not be present.

We want the primary coil to trigger only when a magnet passes, just after top dead center.

So I raised the base resistor to 2.2 Kohm to reduce input current, still using NTE331, the rpm's reduced, though not that much.

I also added 3 more diodes (6A6) in parallel with the 2 other MUR460 flyback diodes to lower resistance, since I noticed the 2 MUR460 diodes were heating a little.

And I again started a new test, The input is even less than it was with the TIP3055, around .21 Amps and the rpm is higher.

I'm keeping it simple at the moment, to figure out the best parameters, so that It can be scaled later, for more useful shaft power.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aldex on August 23, 2018, 01:27:46 AM
Hi, I'm also waiting for a material to arrive here that I ordered to do a new assembly. this African generator is similar to the adams engine but as it is supposed to have no information on the internal measurement of the coils it is difficult to replicate since with the identical interiors it does not work as several people have already tried to replicate. I'm going to start my assembly I believe that next week using these configurations but using the adams principle together because I believe in his design a lot. Already having some result I am passing you. Have you used tip 35c? I used it on some tests and got as good results as tip 3055
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 23, 2018, 04:14:24 AM
Hi aldex, thanks for the positive reply and the fact you are testing also, glad to hear that.

I have not tried TIP35c with this setup, though I think most transistors will work, as long as the current gain is high enough for the coil being used with the feedback trigger version.

Also, the base resistor has to be tuned properly, because too much base drive causes the increased input and the charge side battery does not seem to maintain it's charge level.

As far as using a hall effect sensor, that may be more reliable, meaning easier to tune and no issues with possible run away self oscillations which can happen with the motor feedback coil setup and I do have hall sensors on hand for later possible use.

Would love to hear about the results you are having, could you share any pics or circuit drawing.

I'm continuing testing with the TIP3055 again.
peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 23, 2018, 06:06:54 PM
Hi all, here is an odd observation, after using the NTE331, I found with my setup as it is, the TIP3055 works the way we want, it seems to keep the battery charge up.

I had another TIP3055 on hand and used that and the motor would not rotate, using the 1 Kohm base resistor and only rotated when using a 500 ohm resistor and drained the input battery and did not charge the charge side well at all.

I checked both transistors with the meter and both seem good, only difference was the number shown on diode setting on meter was 100 more for the transistor that works with the 1 Kohm base resistor.

With the good TIP3055, rotor euns at good rpm, draws low input current and charges the charge side battery quickly.

Something must be damaged about that other TIP3055, I don't know.

Now I have to restart testing again, It seems finding the right transistor is important, I know the inventor used the MJE13009, which is a high speed switching transistor, I may need to order some of those to try.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 25, 2018, 05:20:38 AM
Hi all, not much forward progress yet on this setup.

Though I realized I needed more transistor base drive, as this coil is 12 strand, so actually not that many turns for a single strand.

So I used 2 strands in series and that is giving strong base drive now.

Had an NTE52 NPN on hand and that is a high voltage, high speed switching transistor.

It seems to be working very well at the moment, giving good rpm's and about the same input as the TIP3055, am continuing testing with the NTE52 transistor.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aldex on August 27, 2018, 10:55:22 PM
Hi, any news on the project?
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 29, 2018, 04:23:45 AM
Hi aldex, yes, I'm building a bigger model, using a 12" aluminum bicycle wheel, though the actual rim diameter is 8.6", waiting for wheel to arrive.

In meantime, I'm making the coil/cores and coil holders and support structure.

Already have a core done, using 16 awg. bailing wire (black annealed wire), cut to length,
many pieces to fit in plastic pipe.

Spray painted the pieces to reduce eddy currents.

For core holder, using 1/16" wall thickness, 13/16" diameter pvc pipe, used for water heaters, from menards.

Have rectangular ceramic magnets from previous projects for placing around the bike wheel.

Reason for building new setup, the first one was not following the south african design much,
at least this model will be closer in design.

As it comes together, I will post pics.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aldex on August 29, 2018, 05:19:37 AM
Hi, I received my magnets for the beginning of the tests today. tomorrow I start to motar. I bought 20 neo 20x3 and put 4 on each end. respecting more or less the parameters of the project. What's new in 20x3 fashion is not even half the magnetism in the size of the reels that shows the photos of the project. (it was not achieved as this project was successful) I will strictly respect the magnetic field and the size of the magnets for manufacturing and cores of the coils. So send photos as photos. I'll see what happens.
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 29, 2018, 05:57:26 PM
Hi aldex, thanks for the reply.

I think one of the main reasons for using the weaker ceramic magnets, is the saturation of the core,

as too much flux would take more power to overcome and switching times might need to be longer,

which could reduce the higher efficiencies we are seeking.

And here is a picture of one of the cores so far and the bailing wire I used, the ceramic magnets that will be used and the coil former end piece template.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 30, 2018, 12:55:48 AM
Hi all, here is one of the coil/core assemblies finished, just need to wind the coil.

Going to wind a 24awg. bifilar coil for the main primary-feedback coil, as I have that wire on hand.

peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on August 30, 2018, 05:18:22 PM
Hi all, the first main bifilar primary-trigger coil is done, 18 layers of 24awg. magnet wire, with masking tape between each layer.

peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: RoliK on September 01, 2018, 09:57:39 PM
There is a new update on the pjk site.

http://www.free-energy-info.co.uk/Chapter19.pdf

New smaller coil design. Just 22m cable on each coil!

Regards Roland
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aussiebattler on September 02, 2018, 12:22:20 AM
This is definately the way to go. Very similar to my own research.
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 02, 2018, 01:21:03 AM
Hi Rolik, thanks for alerting me to the update and the link.

The repel and attract method is interesting, I've done the same thing in past builds.

I have 24awg. magnet wire on hand, so I will continue to build with that, though I will match the impedance of the main primary coil of the bifilar motor-feedback coil assembly, for each additional, separate single strand coil.

I was questioning his use of the parallel separate coils, as that can be an issue, with the less resistance coils drawing current from the higher resistance coils.

So the lower resistance coils in series is the way to go.

I may remove some of the layers of my main feedback bifilar coil assembly, need to check and see what the primary coil strand resistance is first.

Also, his use of the galvanised bolts is certainly easier, though eddy currents will cause more loss and heat, I will continue to build with the paint coated bailing wire core method, as tedious as it is, I like building things, so no biggie.

Hi aussiebattler, thanks for posting your thoughts, not sure which design you are saying is the way to go, could you explain further, thanks.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aussiebattler on September 02, 2018, 11:22:01 AM
SW  I mean that you need the three  basic elements- coils for generation of voltage, pulse to give motor effect,  timing for pulses
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 03, 2018, 05:43:45 AM
Hi aussiebattler, thanks for the response.

Have you or are you working on something you would like to share, I would be interested to see, if you are working on something.

I'm still working on the coil assemblies, almost finished with the 4th one, will be testing with 4 to start and expand if needed.

Still waiting on the bike wheel to arrive.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aussiebattler on September 03, 2018, 06:39:37 AM
SW here: https://overunity.com/17814/aussie-battler-magnet-motor/msg523811/#msg523811
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 05, 2018, 01:29:57 AM
Hi all, the wheel has arrived, very quick delivery.

It is an aluminum rim wheel, 8.5" diameter.

The cups were way too tight and I removed all grease from bearings and cups and it rotates forever now, even without magnets attached to the rim.

Will get the materials for the main rotor structure, to mount the wheel and coil assemblies.

peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: aussiebattler on September 05, 2018, 01:40:45 AM
SW Did you know there is a bicycle wheel in a UK university that has been turning for 15 years (i think) non stop. I saw it on yutube
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 09, 2018, 04:31:14 AM
Hi all, I now have the materials for the main structure and glued the magnets to the wheel.
I had to use cad and printed out a template, so that i could accurately mark the magnet positions.

The 8 magnet positions are very accurately placed now, after a couple failed attempts with previous methods and the paper template can be seen in the picture.
Coil assembly mounting and the 3 other coils need to be wound yet.
Also had to add a single ball bearing to both sides of the bearing cups of the wheel, as it makes a clanking sound without the added bearing, when using the thin oil.
peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 10, 2018, 10:54:02 PM
Hi all, the main structure is built, just need to secure it to the 3/4" mdf base.
Also need to wind the other 3 coils with 24awg. magnet wire, then work on the circuitry.
Comments or questions are appreciated.
peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: gyulasun on September 11, 2018, 12:31:09 AM
Hi SkyWatcher,
It is going to be a nice setup. The distance-adjustable coil bobbins wrt the rotor magnets are a good idea and so is the tape around the rotor magnets to prevent them from flying out. Last week I sent you a message via this forum, have you read it?
Gyula
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 11, 2018, 04:28:35 AM
Hi all, Hi gyulasun, thanks for the reply and the positive encouraging words.

I am aware of the thread in that forum, though I briefly forgot about it, thanks for reminding me, I'll keep my eye on it.
I realized the main structure needed some reinforcements, so I added some angle bracing to the main coil board and will add a couple braces to the smaller board on the other side.
peace love light :)



Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 12, 2018, 06:50:33 PM
Hi all, I am in the process of finishing up the main structure and bracing and I am noticing the wheel makes a bit of noise.

It's not intolerable, I tweaked the threaded bearing cone and aligned the wheel shaft and was able to lessen the bearing noise.
In the past, I built a one coil, 26" bicycle wheel setup that had barely any bearing noise discernable.

Is it possible the bearing on this wheel is just not designed as well or could it be all the mdf board creating a speaker transducer effect, amplifying the little noise coming from the bearings.I'm using that 3in1 type household oil in the bearings.

Also, if i attach the wheel shaft bolts, and tighten them, it makes quite a bit more noise, If I remove them, and slightly move the mdf board away from the wheel shaft inner nuts, the noise is even less, sure seems like speaker effect.

Any suggestions for reducing the noise a bit more is appreciated, thanks.peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: gyulasun on September 12, 2018, 09:45:02 PM
Hi SkyWatcher,

You found a clanking sound problem already at the start because you wrote in reply #38: "Also had to add a single ball bearing to both sides of the bearing cups of the wheel, as it makes a clanking sound without the added bearing, when using the thin oil."

So this particular wheel you happened to get may have issues with the bearing and the noise is 'amplified' by the structure, this latter can happen, unfortunately.
Found on the web:  "A mixture of graphite and other additives is installed around balls on the cage of a bearing, then treated with pressure and heat. A minute layer of graphite adheres to all contact surfaces of the bearing, and when balls need to turn, the graphite provides the necessary lubricity."

Maybe such graphite treatment can help reduce your noise too, due to the particles fill up the 'gaps' between the contact surfaces. See these too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSTfFIetYPY (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSTfFIetYPY)    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaG_CLsdN4M (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaG_CLsdN4M)

Maybe first you need to soak out all the previous lubricant to 'dry out' the bearing, then apply the graphite lubricant.
 Maybe Magluvin chimes in with some more info.

Gyula
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 13, 2018, 12:09:56 AM
Hi gyulasun, thanks for the reply and information, I'll have a look at those videos shortly, maybe a better lubicant will help even more.
In the meantime, I rebuilt the front wheel holder, made it out of 3/4" mdf, instead of 1/2" and made it smaller, to reduce speaker effect.
It has helped a little more, at least it will be tolerable, even as it is now for testing.
peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 14, 2018, 07:55:29 AM
Hi all, had a chance to test some bearing lubricants today.


I tried only graphite powder, by using fine sand paper against some compass graphite pieces and placed the powder into the bearings, that worked decent, spun fairly freely, though the noise level was still not to my liking.

Then I tried the  3 in one motor oil, equivalent to SAE 20  and that is working very well and the noise is much less.

Not sure what kind of oil is in that household oil can, maybe it's a thinner oil.

So now that the noise issue is acceptable, will work on the other coils.
peace love light :) 
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: RoliK on September 15, 2018, 10:04:27 PM
Thxs for update! We are using WD40 to clean our bearings.

Best wishes, Roland
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 18, 2018, 12:24:48 AM
Hi rolik, thanks for the reply, Does this mean you are experimenting with this south african device.

I finished the 4 coils and now am working on the circuitry.
peace love light :) 
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 18, 2018, 08:51:55 PM
The generator variant is finished, at the least for now, may add more coils later, depending how it goes.
I am running some simple 1 to 1 charging tests for now and logging the data.
peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 20, 2018, 12:06:57 AM
Hi all, interesting results so far.

Though I had to use a darlington pair, using 2 NPN transistors, because previously with the single transistor, I had to use a 68 ohm base resistor to get proper transistor triggering.
Now I can use a 10 Kohm base resistor and the rpm's are a little better and the input went from .11 amps down to .055 amps.
Will continue these basic 1 to 1 charging tests with this new configuration.
peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: shylo on September 21, 2018, 09:56:52 AM
Hi SW,
Nice build, are you using all 4 coils for drive or just the bi-filar one?
The other 3 are just single strand correct.
Thanks for sharing.
artv
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 21, 2018, 06:12:11 PM
Hi shylo, thanks for the positive words.
Yes, all 4 coils are in series for primary power and the 3 others are single strand, correct.
peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 22, 2018, 04:23:27 AM
Hi all, I changed the wiring to all 4 coils in parallel, minus the feedback strand.
The series wiring did not give good rpm's, the parallel wiring gives much better rpm and charging it seems, still testing though to determine best setup.
I tried using a full wave bridge off the other coils to charge the 12 volt charge battery, though the voltage is only around 9 volts at the given rpm.
So the paralleled option with the main power coil seems to be working well.
peace love light :)
Here is the circuit I'm currently testing.

 
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 22, 2018, 11:57:03 PM
Hi all, I'm observing an overall voltage gain between the two 12 volt batteries so far, when using the parallel wired coil connection.
At the very start of testing, just before starting the tests with the series wired coil connection, the combined rest voltage of both 12 volt tractor batteries, was 25.255 volts.
After a few hour test run with the latest parallel wired coils, the overall resting voltage is 25.29 volts.
So based on these observations so far, the claim that the voltage stays about the same is true.

The only thing I have yet to test, is if a load can be placed across the charge battery as shown in the patrick kelley, chapter 19 pdf and still maintain an equal or greater overall voltage on the batteries.
Another observation, this wheel seems to have quite a bit of torque that is not being used at the moment.
peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 25, 2018, 04:44:22 AM
Hi all, the testing results are looking very good.


So far, I have changed the configuration 3 times and the system has used a total of 27.50 watt hours, when I combine the power used during all tests run for each configuration.

And yet, the overall voltage for both batteries, is equal to or a little greater, compared to when I first started testing.

The next tests will be with a 12 volt led bulb load across the input battery, as shown in the pdf.
peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: shylo on September 25, 2018, 10:30:32 PM
what purpose does the neon serve?
is it not considered a load?
I had a similar setup a few years back ,but I was trying to use mechanical switching, and was only using cap banks for supply.
I had no electronics other than caps and diodes,

The best I could achieve was 31 minutes of self run.
My rpm wasn't quite fast enough to keep the caps up ,but I think it was just poor build.
I think electronic would be more precise.
I'm currently rebuilding but would appreciate help with the electronics' since I'm more of a mechanical type.
Keep moving forward as your work is greatly appreciated.

Thanks artv
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: Thaelin on September 26, 2018, 02:55:37 AM
  As much as I can tell here, this is the same old JB wheel we all messed with years ago. It does fix old batts well but not a self run.
If you want to go that way, you need to convert the output to hot energy and not cold. They do not mix well. Need to use some sort
of dump circuit to the charge batt so as not to have a closed system.
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on September 26, 2018, 05:03:30 AM
Hi shylo, thanks for the reply.
The neon is used to limit damage of the transistor, if the load is removed from the flyback diode connection.

Because the neon will conduct with the higher voltage and current will flow, then at that point, it would be considered a small load.
Yes, I'll help with electronics, If I am able to.
Keep in mind shylo, this is a battery swapping configuration, I'm doing it manually at the moment, because I'm still testing.


Hi thaelin, thanks for checking in.It is the same bedini type wheel, though it is a common ground circuit setup, which I think is a hotter electricity.
I'm still testing, though as said, when just powering the wheel, the overall voltage is equal or a little greater, after 27.5 watt hours, that has my attention for sure.
My latest testing of powering a load as well, when connecting the ecosmart 12 volt, 4.8 watt led bulb across the input battery, that drained the voltage as I would expect, even though the south african developer shows that it works for them.
So I tried the led bulb in series with the positive supply input and the led did not power up, though the wheel still rotated fine.

Then I placed the led bulb in series with the flyback diode output to charge battery positive and it does light fairly well and still seems to be charging well.
Still testing the load powering aspect, to see if it will hold equal or a little greater overall battery voltage, when swapping for a few cycles.
peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: RoliK on October 05, 2018, 09:47:31 PM
Hi skywatcher,

Did you see the update from http://www.free-energy-info.co.uk/Chapter19.pdf ?
Now, they published a solid state version!!

I will replicate it. Needed parts are ordered!

Regards Roland
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on October 07, 2018, 06:48:47 AM
Hi rolik, thanks for sharing, yes I did see that and have already built a similar setup.
I'm testing the ufopolitics setup at the moment.

Using 555 timer


4 mosfets in parallel
12 strand 24awg. in parallel air coil 


12 volt input..63 amp input

Ultrafast MUR460 diodes

Diodes and mosfets running cold.

It is working very well so far.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on October 07, 2018, 07:45:20 PM
Hi all, Hi rolik, here is the oscillator, each mosfet has 100 ohm gate resistors
and each source pin has 56 Kohm pull down resistors.
Transistors are SSF45N20B

200 volt, RDS .065 ohm

26.4 amp continuous

peace love light :)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on November 14, 2018, 04:48:33 AM
Hi all, I'm testing the south african type device again.
I'm only using one bifilar drive coil and 3 separate generator core/coils.
Using the 3 separate core/coils to power a 12 volt led bulb and create a mechanical load, to see if the batteries will still maintain voltage and charge.
Led bulb is connected to full wave bridge with 1.5 farad car audio capacitor for smoothing output.
So far, it is looking positive.
Have run 13 cycles, swapping 12 volt tractor battery with each cycle and giving rest period in between cycles, most of the time.
Starting rest voltages:
Battery A = 12.65 volts

Battery B = 12.70 volts

Total hours run time so far = 13.5 hours or 70 watt hours used, as drive circuit draws 5.2 watts.


After 9 hours system run time, overnight resting battery voltages:

Battery A = 12.695 volts
Battery B = 12.655 volts


After 12 hour system run time, 4 hour resting battery voltages:

Battery A = 12.64 volts
Battery B = 12.735 volts

Your positive thoughts welcome.
peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: erfandl on November 14, 2018, 08:17:25 AM
Hi SkyWatcher. thanks for sharing the result. looks like the result is good and the output battery getting charged while consuming energy! so we have an overunity device ? I start to building the 150 watt South Africa generator with 10 coils
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: Turbo on November 14, 2018, 09:38:02 AM
Theres no way a mosfet is handling 26.4 amp without a heatsink.
That thing will go up in smoke within 5 seconds.
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: gyulasun on November 14, 2018, 01:07:55 PM
Theres no way a mosfet is handling 26.4 amp without a heatsink.
That thing will go up in smoke within 5 seconds.
Yes but the 26.4 Amper is taken from the data sheet of his MOSFET.   ;)
http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/fairchild/SSF45N20B.pdf 
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: citfta on November 14, 2018, 03:58:14 PM
And he clearly posted he is using 4 (FOUR) mosfets in parallel.  So each mosfet is only carrying less than 7 amps.
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on November 14, 2018, 11:58:08 PM
Hi all, thanks for comments, though I'm testing the mechanical version again, not solid state.
Hi erfandl, thanks for the reply, I switched the testing setup to use 2 separate drive core/coils in parallel, of course one of them has the trigger winding.
Reason for this, it seems to replenish charge better to the charge battery, using 8.7 watts input to drive circuit now.
It seems to help when using more coils in parallel, with just the one drive coil, I don't think it will keep the batteries level, at original charge voltage.
It still works fine for this round of tests, because the rpm is higher and still lighting the led bulb the same or a little brighter, even though It only has 2 separate generator coils now.
I think this setup needs another 4 separate coil/cores to really show its potential.
Oh and a battery balancing can help periodically, by placing the two 12 volt tractor batteries in parallel for awhile.

peace love light
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: BlueFalcon on November 15, 2018, 08:23:50 AM
Hey SkyWatcher123

Can you confirm that your design is creating excess power over what the circuit is using?
My circuit does not, but i am using the coil design as recommend in PKs book which was 3 layers on a 140mm ferrite rod and only have 2 wound at the moment so maybe not enough inductance?
Also any idea of the frequency you are running at?

Many Thanks
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: Turbo on November 15, 2018, 08:47:46 AM
Yes but the 26.4 Amper is taken from the data sheet of his MOSFET.   ;)
http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/fairchild/SSF45N20B.pdf

What are you trying to say ?
The circuit draws 26 amps because it's in the datasheet ?
None of this makes any sense.
No circuit is going to handle 26 or even 7 amps without a heatsink.
It's all just made up some number here some number from the data sheet.
Keep it realistic do you have any idea how much 7 amps actually is ?
That's almost a hundred Watts.
Anybody with a bit of an electronics background knows that you cant switch those numbers with a bare transistor.
i have been here from 2006 up till now thats 12 years and literally nothing has changed.
Even the site administrator is as lazy as he has always been.
The only conclusion that can be drawn here is that we are doomed !
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: gyulasun on November 15, 2018, 02:35:48 PM
Hej Turbo,

If you jump into threads and do not go through all the information that was given already, then you make erroneous comments.

In his reply #60 above, SkyWatcher wrote some relevant info that included 12 V input at .63 A input current for his total circuit.

In his reply #61, he included some data on his switching MOSFET and I was trying to say this to you, with the link to the data sheet to draw your attention. You can see the 25.4 A current value in the first page under the Features column. 
 
I did not mean or imply that 26.4 A current was flowing through any of the MOSFETs. I KNEW that his input current was 0.63 Amper because he had written it. So the 0.63 A input current was divided among the 4 parallel MOSFETs, rendering roughly 0.63/4 Amper for each MOSFET, so the dissipation could be roughly 12V x 0.16 A = 1.9 W for each MOSFET.
This can be dissipated without a heat sink, right?  Unfortunately, member Citfta also wrongly commented in his reply #66 that each MOSFET was only carrying less than 7 Ampers, he sounded not to consider the input current of  .63 Amper given in the same post where the 4 paralleled MOSFETs were mentioned.  Or he considered it but the use of the less than 7 A was unfortunate.

You wrote:
Quote
No circuit is going to handle 26 or even 7 amps without a heatsink.
I agree with this. And by now you know: SkyWatcher did not just make up some numbers from the data sheet and each of his bare (i.e. no heat sinked) transistors can switch the .16 A without being toasted. This should be an average value (DMM measured) becasue I now he uses such.  (And I know of course that the peak currents can be much higher than that.)

You wrote:
Quote
i have been here from 2006 up till now thats 12 years and literally nothing has changed.
Even the site administrator is as lazy as he has always been.
The only conclusion that can be drawn here is that we are doomed !

I agree and would add the followings: the technical knowledge is always casual for a forum like this, so were we also doomed 12 years ago too?   Newcomers always appear and the useless chapters start over and over again. 
I know you have tinkered a lot, especially with the TPU project, and I respect this.  I hope you have reached your goals.

Just take it a bit easier. 

Gyula
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: Turbo on November 16, 2018, 07:58:59 AM
Nobody is going to reach any goal.
We will be swallowed by the sun and it will all be over.
At least nobody will be complaining about being cold.
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: SkyWatcher123 on November 22, 2018, 09:45:07 PM
Hi all, Hi gyulasun, thanks, you explained it correctly.

So after collecting some more data from the mechanical version, I AM now testing the solid state version again.

Though this time, I'm using the diode off the collector and a common ground.
Using 8 - 1N5408 diodes in parallel off the transistor collector into positive of the charge battery, same 555 timer and 4 mosfets and 12 strand air coil.
What is interesting at the moment, is that the batteries were losing charge slowly, when using the mechanical version, down to about 12.61 volts per 12 volt tractor battery.
However, when charging with the solid state version, the voltage is coming up again, overall.
I ran the circuit for about 8 hours, then placed both batteries in parallel for hours, to try and equalize charge.
Then we had, 12.59 volts and 12.69 volts, after resting overnight.
I've placed them in parallel again, to further equalize charge in the batteries.

Though as it stands, the batteries seem to be gaining charge again, more testing is needed.
peace love light  :)
Here is the solid state circuit I'm using.
https://ibb.co/g4SpqV (https://ibb.co/g4SpqV)


 
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: erfandl on December 03, 2018, 05:12:19 PM
Hi all, I'm testing the south african type device again.
I'm only using one bifilar drive coil and 3 separate generator core/coils.
Using the 3 separate core/coils to power a 12 volt led bulb and create a mechanical load, to see if the batteries will still maintain voltage and charge.
Led bulb is connected to full wave bridge with 1.5 farad car audio capacitor for smoothing output.
So far, it is looking positive.
Have run 13 cycles, swapping 12 volt tractor battery with each cycle and giving rest period in between cycles, most of the time.
Starting rest voltages:
Battery A = 12.65 volts

Battery B = 12.70 volts

Total hours run time so far = 13.5 hours or 70 watt hours used, as drive circuit draws 5.2 watts.


After 9 hours system run time, overnight resting battery voltages:

Battery A = 12.695 volts
Battery B = 12.655 volts


After 12 hour system run time, 4 hour resting battery voltages:

Battery A = 12.64 volts
Battery B = 12.735 volts

Your positive thoughts welcome.
peace love light
Hi skywatcher. I build the african mechanical generator version with 10 coils. the rotor speed is very very high RPM. the input is 12 volt 7.5 amp battery and the output is 27 volt but the charging performance is not very good. can you help me to solving the performance ? do you think any problem with the circuit ? the developer in document said: its generating 600 to 900 volt but its only generating 27 volt !  pictures of the circuit and mechanical unit is below.
thanks.


Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: doktorsvet on December 04, 2018, 07:23:57 AM

well you give! Cores of iron bolts ... Why not put the ferrite rods?
You correctly say that a mechanical motor is worse than a solid-state one. Due to low current density.
But you can use mechanical energy to get a boost.

If I'm wrong, correct me
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: erfandl on December 04, 2018, 08:54:36 AM
well you give! Cores of iron bolts ... Why not put the ferrite rods?
You correctly say that a mechanical motor is worse than a solid-state one. Due to low current density.
But you can use mechanical energy to get a boost.

If I'm wrong, correct me
thanks for reply. you mean I'm replacing the iron bolt of coils with ferrite rods ? whats different between the iron bolt and the ferrite ? and the solid version is better than mechanical ?
thanks
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: doktorsvet on December 04, 2018, 09:30:30 AM

It does not need a lot of mind, all in the classics.

Magnetically soft material gives higher efficiency.

The magnet on the back of the core removes sticking.

According to Beddini, mechanical energy gives 20% efficiency. Here it can be used.


Ask, I always answer that I know. Sometimes I can be wrong.  ;)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: erfandl on December 04, 2018, 09:57:33 AM
It does not need a lot of mind, all in the classics.

Magnetically soft material gives higher efficiency.

The magnet on the back of the core removes sticking.

According to Beddini, mechanical energy gives 20% efficiency. Here it can be used.


Ask, I always answer that I know. Sometimes I can be wrong.  ;)
thanks. I'm testing and report
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: e2matrix on December 04, 2018, 07:02:35 PM
Nobody is going to reach any goal.
We will be swallowed by the sun and it will all be over.
At least nobody will be complaining about being cold.


Turbo's real name is Debby Downer    ;)
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: gyulasun on December 04, 2018, 07:05:04 PM
Hi skywatcher. I build the african mechanical generator version with 10 coils. the rotor speed is very very high RPM. the input is 12 volt 7.5 amp battery and the output is 27 volt but the charging performance is not very good. can you help me to solving the performance ? do you think any problem with the circuit ? the developer in document said: its generating 600 to 900 volt but its only generating 27 volt !  pictures of the circuit and mechanical unit is below.
thanks.
Hi erfandl,
I assume the 600 to 900 volt HV spikes amplitude the developer said was under an unloaded condition and also very likely meant peak values.   Now your 27 volt was measured by a DMM or an oscilloscope and did you mean an average or peak value? Also, the 27 volt was a loaded or unloaded measurement ? (regardless of what instrument you used)
Quote
... you mean I'm replacing the iron bolt of coils with ferrite rods ? whats different between the iron bolt and the ferrite ?
...
As an addition to doktorsvet's answer,  the difference between them is that ferrite material has much much less eddy current loss than bolts. In changing magnetic field circuits you should avoid using electrically conducting core materials for the coils.
Your 27 volt 'output' may or may not be explained by the lossy bolts, when you replace the bolts with ferrite rods or ferrite material, you will see.  There maybe other issues of course but the bolt is one of them.

Gyula


Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: erfandl on December 04, 2018, 09:19:38 PM
Hi erfandl,
I assume the 600 to 900 volt HV spikes amplitude the developer said was under an unloaded condition and also very likely meant peak values.   Now your 27 volt was measured by a DMM or an oscilloscope and did you mean an average or peak value? Also, the 27 volt was a loaded or unloaded measurement ? (regardless of what instrument you used)As an addition to doktorsvet's answer,  the difference between them is that ferrite material has much much less eddy current loss than bolts. In changing magnetic field circuits you should avoid using electrically conducting core materials for the coils.
Your 27 volt 'output' may or may not be explained by the lossy bolts, when you replace the bolts with ferrite rods or ferrite material, you will see.  There maybe other issues of course but the bolt is one of them.

Gyula
Hi Gyula thanks for reply. I'm measuring the unloaded voltage with DMM it's showing 27 volt. this system can charging battery without any load but when connecting a 500 watt inverter with a 3 watt LED bulb then the charging battery drained and didn't charging. also input battery with or without any load draining. do you think any problem with the circuit ? or the motor wiring ? but the circuit pulling 1.20 AMP from the battery and the one of the output wire from the motor is 1.60 AMP output ! thats mean this unit increasing the current by 40% ?!!! I measuring the current with a clamp meter.
thanks
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: gyulasun on December 04, 2018, 11:21:37 PM
Hi erfandl,

From your description it comes that the charging battery cannot feed your inverter + the 3W LED because the charge it receives from the circuit cannot make up for the discharging process the inverter + the LED represents.
Whether this is a problem in your circuit or not, this cannot be said for sure, there is certainly one thing you can improve in the circuit: replace the bolt cores of the coils with ferrite or laminated cores, to minimize eddy current losses.
But this may still not solve this problem, unfortunately.

I would suggest the followings: if you have not done so, check with a DMM the AC output voltages of the individual 'blue' coils one by one to see if there are more than 10-15 % difference between them. Also, check the total AC across all the 6 coils whether they add up to the sum of the individual AC voltages, this is a check also for the correct series connection of the coils.  If there is a big difference, then try to check two or three coils only at a time whether they add up correctly.
You may wish to check the induced AC output voltages of the blue coils also when you disconnect the gate drive to the 2nd IRF840 to stop it switching. Does this disconnection changes the motor RPM?

Gyula
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: doktorsvet on December 05, 2018, 08:30:05 AM

if neodymium is close to the core, the ferrite will heat up because it will saturate
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: erfandl on December 05, 2018, 11:08:50 AM
Hi erfandl,

From your description it comes that the charging battery cannot feed your inverter + the 3W LED because the charge it receives from the circuit cannot make up for the discharging process the inverter + the LED represents.
Whether this is a problem in your circuit or not, this cannot be said for sure, there is certainly one thing you can improve in the circuit: replace the bolt cores of the coils with ferrite or laminated cores, to minimize eddy current losses.
But this may still not solve this problem, unfortunately.

I would suggest the followings: if you have not done so, check with a DMM the AC output voltages of the individual 'blue' coils one by one to see if there are more than 10-15 % difference between them. Also, check the total AC across all the 6 coils whether they add up to the sum of the individual AC voltages, this is a check also for the correct series connection of the coils.  If there is a big difference, then try to check two or three coils only at a time whether they add up correctly.
You may wish to check the induced AC output voltages of the blue coils also when you disconnect the gate drive to the 2nd IRF840 to stop it switching. Does this disconnection changes the motor RPM?

Gyula
thanks for reply. OK I'm measuring the blue coils with DMM and AC mode it's showing 33 volt AC for each coils ! I disconnect the coil number 8 but the motor continuous running without any changes the motor rpm
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: gyulasun on December 05, 2018, 11:36:39 AM
thanks for reply. OK I'm measuring the blue coils with DMM and AC mode it's showing 33 volt AC for each coils ! I disconnect the coil number 8 but the motor continuous running without any changes the motor rpm
Well, then just check AC voltage across any 2 blue coils in series like say coils 6 and 8 or say across coils nr 10 and nr 2: if they show less than say 55-60 volts then it is not good to connect them in series because their phase angle differ and start working against each other.  If you find say 10-15 volts only across two blue coils, then try to flip the wires of one of the coils to see if you get the sum of the two, and so on.

Instead, try to use individual full wave diode bridges across each blue coil to collect their 33 V into individual puffer capacitors while they remain in series connection.  It is possible that when you try to load the DC outputs of the individual puffer capacitors the RPM of the motor will be reduced (normal Lenz).

Question: when you disconnect the coil nr 8, how the induced 33 volt changes across the individual blue coils? Does it change?

Gyula
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: erfandl on December 05, 2018, 12:13:25 PM
Well, then just check AC voltage across any 2 blue coils in series like say coils 6 and 8 or say across coils nr 10 and nr 2: if they show less than say 55-60 volts then it is not good to connect them in series because their phase angle differ and start working against each other.  If you find say 10-15 volts only across two blue coils, then try to flip the wires of one of the coils to see if you get the sum of the two, and so on.

Instead, try to use individual full wave diode bridges across each blue coil to collect their 33 V into individual puffer capacitors while they remain in series connection.  It is possible that when you try to load the DC outputs of the individual puffer capacitors the RPM of the motor will be reduced (normal Lenz).

Question: when you disconnect the coil nr 8, how the induced 33 volt changes across the individual blue coils? Does it change?

Gyula
thanks. the AC voltage between the 6 and 8 coil is 1.2 volt :( I'm re wiring the motor and connecting the coil 1 and 4 to the plus of the circuit the RMP is now higher. but the AC output voltage is now 24 volt.
here is my coil. all 10 coil are winding Clockwise.
also the motor will not starting automatically. I must handle the motor with hand. also the motor rotating to both sides
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: gyulasun on December 05, 2018, 12:37:36 PM
Well, you are free to make any coil combinations so that the induced voltages should sum up.
As per common logic if all the coils are positioned with the same identical winding sense,
then their induced voltages should sum up. 
The 1.2 volt resulting between coils 6 and 8 may indicate one of them should be flipped by its wires.
I assume you have 5 rotor magnets, right? 
Gyula
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: erfandl on December 05, 2018, 12:47:18 PM
Well, you are free to make any coil combinations so that the induced voltages should sum up.
As per common logic if all the coils are positioned with the same identical winding sense,
then their induced voltages should sum up. 
The 1.2 volt resulting between coils 6 and 8 may indicate one of them should be flipped by its wires.
I assume you have 5 rotor magnets, right? 
Gyula
thanks. the motor will not starting automatically. I must handle the motor with hand. also the motor rotating to both sides !
yeah the rotor have 5 magnets. all N side is out. the hall sensors are installed in coil 1 and coil 4

Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: gyulasun on December 05, 2018, 01:06:08 PM
Well, it is "normal" in this setup that you have to start the rotor by hand because all the 5 magnets
strongly attracts to the 5 bolts they are just facing, this is inherently so in this arrangement.

Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: doktorsvet on December 05, 2018, 04:31:42 PM
 erfandl,
If not difficult, draw a diagram of the connection of the coils.

I myself did not read how it was done in Africa, but you can start the reverse EMF in a circle...
For this you need to leave 5 magnets, and put the coils 6.  :D
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: Ed morbus on December 06, 2018, 05:49:43 PM
Use stainless steel for bolt and nuts
Title: Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
Post by: Beega on February 21, 2019, 11:36:29 AM
Hi!
I have made a solid state generator as described in the PK's book.
I wound 6 coils on 140 mm ferrite rods, made the timer exactly as specified and checked the voltage from pin 3.
I connected the coils in series. Their combined resistance is 6 Ohms.
Source is car battery 12V 45Ah instead of suggested 12V 7Ah. Linear resistor connected to 555 timer is 50 kOhm.
Circuit drains the battery and I am unable to get it to charge the battery.
Input current measured with cheap digital multimeter is  roughly beetween 1.4A and 0.6A. Increasing the resistance on linear resistor is bringing down the input current and bringing up the voltage drop on the coils. Voltage drop on the coils is always below the input voltage on the battery.
I need help. Does anyone have any suggestion what to do next?

https://cdn1.imggmi.com/uploads/2019/2/21/5893ec0b94ebce06bc8298f59a6c1c97-full.jpg