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Author Topic: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa  (Read 8749 times)

Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #60 on: October 07, 2018, 07:45:20 PM »
Hi all, Hi rolik, here is the oscillator, each mosfet has 100 ohm gate resistors
and each source pin has 56 Kohm pull down resistors.
Transistors are SSF45N20B

200 volt, RDS .065 ohm

26.4 amp continuous

peace love light :)

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #61 on: November 14, 2018, 04:48:33 AM »
Hi all, I'm testing the south african type device again.
I'm only using one bifilar drive coil and 3 separate generator core/coils.
Using the 3 separate core/coils to power a 12 volt led bulb and create a mechanical load, to see if the batteries will still maintain voltage and charge.
Led bulb is connected to full wave bridge with 1.5 farad car audio capacitor for smoothing output.
So far, it is looking positive.
Have run 13 cycles, swapping 12 volt tractor battery with each cycle and giving rest period in between cycles, most of the time.
Starting rest voltages:
Battery A = 12.65 volts

Battery B = 12.70 volts

Total hours run time so far = 13.5 hours or 70 watt hours used, as drive circuit draws 5.2 watts.


After 9 hours system run time, overnight resting battery voltages:

Battery A = 12.695 volts
Battery B = 12.655 volts


After 12 hour system run time, 4 hour resting battery voltages:

Battery A = 12.64 volts
Battery B = 12.735 volts

Your positive thoughts welcome.
peace love light

Offline erfandl

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #62 on: November 14, 2018, 08:17:25 AM »
Hi SkyWatcher. thanks for sharing the result. looks like the result is good and the output battery getting charged while consuming energy! so we have an overunity device ? I start to building the 150 watt South Africa generator with 10 coils

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #62 on: November 14, 2018, 08:17:25 AM »
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Offline Turbo

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #63 on: November 14, 2018, 09:38:02 AM »
Theres no way a mosfet is handling 26.4 amp without a heatsink.
That thing will go up in smoke within 5 seconds.

Offline gyulasun

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #64 on: November 14, 2018, 01:07:55 PM »
Theres no way a mosfet is handling 26.4 amp without a heatsink.
That thing will go up in smoke within 5 seconds.
Yes but the 26.4 Amper is taken from the data sheet of his MOSFET.   ;)
http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/fairchild/SSF45N20B.pdf 

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #64 on: November 14, 2018, 01:07:55 PM »
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Offline citfta

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #65 on: November 14, 2018, 03:58:14 PM »
And he clearly posted he is using 4 (FOUR) mosfets in parallel.  So each mosfet is only carrying less than 7 amps.

Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #66 on: November 14, 2018, 11:58:08 PM »
Hi all, thanks for comments, though I'm testing the mechanical version again, not solid state.
Hi erfandl, thanks for the reply, I switched the testing setup to use 2 separate drive core/coils in parallel, of course one of them has the trigger winding.
Reason for this, it seems to replenish charge better to the charge battery, using 8.7 watts input to drive circuit now.
It seems to help when using more coils in parallel, with just the one drive coil, I don't think it will keep the batteries level, at original charge voltage.
It still works fine for this round of tests, because the rpm is higher and still lighting the led bulb the same or a little brighter, even though It only has 2 separate generator coils now.
I think this setup needs another 4 separate coil/cores to really show its potential.
Oh and a battery balancing can help periodically, by placing the two 12 volt tractor batteries in parallel for awhile.

peace love light

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #66 on: November 14, 2018, 11:58:08 PM »
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Offline BlueFalcon

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #67 on: November 15, 2018, 08:23:50 AM »
Hey SkyWatcher123

Can you confirm that your design is creating excess power over what the circuit is using?
My circuit does not, but i am using the coil design as recommend in PKs book which was 3 layers on a 140mm ferrite rod and only have 2 wound at the moment so maybe not enough inductance?
Also any idea of the frequency you are running at?

Many Thanks

Offline Turbo

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #68 on: November 15, 2018, 08:47:46 AM »
Yes but the 26.4 Amper is taken from the data sheet of his MOSFET.   ;)
http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheet/fairchild/SSF45N20B.pdf

What are you trying to say ?
The circuit draws 26 amps because it's in the datasheet ?
None of this makes any sense.
No circuit is going to handle 26 or even 7 amps without a heatsink.
It's all just made up some number here some number from the data sheet.
Keep it realistic do you have any idea how much 7 amps actually is ?
That's almost a hundred Watts.
Anybody with a bit of an electronics background knows that you cant switch those numbers with a bare transistor.
i have been here from 2006 up till now thats 12 years and literally nothing has changed.
Even the site administrator is as lazy as he has always been.
The only conclusion that can be drawn here is that we are doomed !

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #68 on: November 15, 2018, 08:47:46 AM »
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Offline gyulasun

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #69 on: November 15, 2018, 02:35:48 PM »
Hej Turbo,

If you jump into threads and do not go through all the information that was given already, then you make erroneous comments.

In his reply #60 above, SkyWatcher wrote some relevant info that included 12 V input at .63 A input current for his total circuit.

In his reply #61, he included some data on his switching MOSFET and I was trying to say this to you, with the link to the data sheet to draw your attention. You can see the 25.4 A current value in the first page under the Features column. 
 
I did not mean or imply that 26.4 A current was flowing through any of the MOSFETs. I KNEW that his input current was 0.63 Amper because he had written it. So the 0.63 A input current was divided among the 4 parallel MOSFETs, rendering roughly 0.63/4 Amper for each MOSFET, so the dissipation could be roughly 12V x 0.16 A = 1.9 W for each MOSFET.
This can be dissipated without a heat sink, right?  Unfortunately, member Citfta also wrongly commented in his reply #66 that each MOSFET was only carrying less than 7 Ampers, he sounded not to consider the input current of  .63 Amper given in the same post where the 4 paralleled MOSFETs were mentioned.  Or he considered it but the use of the less than 7 A was unfortunate.

You wrote:
Quote
No circuit is going to handle 26 or even 7 amps without a heatsink.
I agree with this. And by now you know: SkyWatcher did not just make up some numbers from the data sheet and each of his bare (i.e. no heat sinked) transistors can switch the .16 A without being toasted. This should be an average value (DMM measured) becasue I now he uses such.  (And I know of course that the peak currents can be much higher than that.)

You wrote:
Quote
i have been here from 2006 up till now thats 12 years and literally nothing has changed.
Even the site administrator is as lazy as he has always been.
The only conclusion that can be drawn here is that we are doomed !

I agree and would add the followings: the technical knowledge is always casual for a forum like this, so were we also doomed 12 years ago too?   Newcomers always appear and the useless chapters start over and over again. 
I know you have tinkered a lot, especially with the TPU project, and I respect this.  I hope you have reached your goals.

Just take it a bit easier. 

Gyula

Offline Turbo

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #70 on: November 16, 2018, 07:58:59 AM »
Nobody is going to reach any goal.
We will be swallowed by the sun and it will all be over.
At least nobody will be complaining about being cold.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #70 on: November 16, 2018, 07:58:59 AM »
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Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #71 on: November 22, 2018, 09:45:07 PM »
Hi all, Hi gyulasun, thanks, you explained it correctly.

So after collecting some more data from the mechanical version, I AM now testing the solid state version again.

Though this time, I'm using the diode off the collector and a common ground.
Using 8 - 1N5408 diodes in parallel off the transistor collector into positive of the charge battery, same 555 timer and 4 mosfets and 12 strand air coil.
What is interesting at the moment, is that the batteries were losing charge slowly, when using the mechanical version, down to about 12.61 volts per 12 volt tractor battery.
However, when charging with the solid state version, the voltage is coming up again, overall.
I ran the circuit for about 8 hours, then placed both batteries in parallel for hours, to try and equalize charge.
Then we had, 12.59 volts and 12.69 volts, after resting overnight.
I've placed them in parallel again, to further equalize charge in the batteries.

Though as it stands, the batteries seem to be gaining charge again, more testing is needed.
peace love light  :)
Here is the solid state circuit I'm using.
https://ibb.co/g4SpqV


 
« Last Edit: November 23, 2018, 04:57:25 AM by SkyWatcher123 »

Offline erfandl

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #72 on: December 03, 2018, 05:12:19 PM »
Hi all, I'm testing the south african type device again.
I'm only using one bifilar drive coil and 3 separate generator core/coils.
Using the 3 separate core/coils to power a 12 volt led bulb and create a mechanical load, to see if the batteries will still maintain voltage and charge.
Led bulb is connected to full wave bridge with 1.5 farad car audio capacitor for smoothing output.
So far, it is looking positive.
Have run 13 cycles, swapping 12 volt tractor battery with each cycle and giving rest period in between cycles, most of the time.
Starting rest voltages:
Battery A = 12.65 volts

Battery B = 12.70 volts

Total hours run time so far = 13.5 hours or 70 watt hours used, as drive circuit draws 5.2 watts.


After 9 hours system run time, overnight resting battery voltages:

Battery A = 12.695 volts
Battery B = 12.655 volts


After 12 hour system run time, 4 hour resting battery voltages:

Battery A = 12.64 volts
Battery B = 12.735 volts

Your positive thoughts welcome.
peace love light
Hi skywatcher. I build the african mechanical generator version with 10 coils. the rotor speed is very very high RPM. the input is 12 volt 7.5 amp battery and the output is 27 volt but the charging performance is not very good. can you help me to solving the performance ? do you think any problem with the circuit ? the developer in document said: its generating 600 to 900 volt but its only generating 27 volt !  pictures of the circuit and mechanical unit is below.
thanks.



Offline doktorsvet

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #73 on: December 04, 2018, 07:23:57 AM »

well you give! Cores of iron bolts ... Why not put the ferrite rods?
You correctly say that a mechanical motor is worse than a solid-state one. Due to low current density.
But you can use mechanical energy to get a boost.

If I'm wrong, correct me

Offline erfandl

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Re: Self-Powered Generator - Inventor From South Africa
« Reply #74 on: December 04, 2018, 08:54:36 AM »
well you give! Cores of iron bolts ... Why not put the ferrite rods?
You correctly say that a mechanical motor is worse than a solid-state one. Due to low current density.
But you can use mechanical energy to get a boost.

If I'm wrong, correct me
thanks for reply. you mean I'm replacing the iron bolt of coils with ferrite rods ? whats different between the iron bolt and the ferrite ? and the solid version is better than mechanical ?
thanks

 

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