Language: 
To browser these website, it's necessary to store cookies on your computer.
The cookies contain no personal information, they are required for program control.
  the storage of cookies while browsing this website, on Login and Register.

GDPR and DSGVO law

Storing Cookies (See : http://ec.europa.eu/ipg/basics/legal/cookies/index_en.htm ) help us to bring you our services at overunity.com . If you use this website and our services you declare yourself okay with using cookies .More Infos here:
https://overunity.com/5553/privacy-policy/
If you do not agree with storing cookies, please LEAVE this website now. From the 25th of May 2018, every existing user has to accept the GDPR agreement at first login. If a user is unwilling to accept the GDPR, he should email us and request to erase his account. Many thanks for your understanding.
Amazon Warehouse Deals ! Now even more Deep Discounts ! Check out these great prices on slightly used or just opened once only items.I always buy my gadgets via these great Warehouse deals ! Highly recommended ! Many thanks for supporting OverUnity.com this way.

User Menu

Tesla Paper

Free Energy Book

Get paid

Donations

Please Donate for the Forum.
Many thanks.
Regards, Stefan.(Admin)

A-Ads

Powerbox

Smartbox

3D Solar

3D Solar Panels

DC2DC converter

Micro JouleThief

FireMatch

FireMatch

CCKnife

CCKnife

CCTool

CCTool

Magpi Magazine

Magpi Magazine Free Rasberry Pi Magazine

Battery Recondition

Battery Recondition

Arduino

Ultracaps

YT Subscribe

Gravity Machines

Tesla-Ebook

Magnet Secrets

Lindemann Video

Navigation

Products

Products

WaterMotor kit

Statistics

  • *Total Members: 84090
  • *Latest: Hest

  • *Total Posts: 895694
  • *Total Topics: 15756
  • *Online Today: 44
  • *Most Online: 103
(December 19, 2006, 11:27:19 PM)
  • *Users: 0
  • *Guests: 11
  • *Total: 11

Author Topic: Pierre's 170W in 1600W out Looped Very impressive Build continued & moderated  (Read 239586 times)

Offline iflewmyown

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 130
Thanks for the update. Fantastic. Looks like a life form.
Garry

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline NerzhDishual

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 588
    • FreeNRG.info
all,
Je me demande si les moteurs universels comme sur l'image ci dessous ne pourraient pas convenir pour ce type d'expérimentation..[.......].
juste une idée ;)

A clever lazy man very good  idea, IMHO.
Français (Coluchien): Voila une idée qu'elle est très bonne, selon moi!

Sinon:

Offline gotoluc

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3096
Thanks for the update. Fantastic. Looks like a life form.
Garry

Thanks Garry

I also received this personal message from Pierre:

very nice job, except for the location of the arduino,  there's a good chance it will be affected by the magnetic field being so close. Would be better not to put the electronics so close to the magnetic field.

Fr. J'ai aussi reçu ce message personnel de Pierre:

Fr. très beau travail sauf l'emplacement de l'arduino il y a de grosse chance qu'il  bug a cause des champs magnétique qui sont coller dessus il serait préférable de ne pas mettre l'électronique aussi près du champ magnétique

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Sponsored links:




Offline pmgr

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 154
    • Stop organ harvesting from Falun Gong practitioners
If anyone thinks this is an easy build you better think again. Winding a stator is only 25% of the job. See below video of my finished product. Testing will begin tomorrow after winding the center core.

Fr. Si quelqu'un pense que c'est une construction facile, il vaut mieux réfléchir à nouveau. L'enroulement d'un stator ne représente que 25% du travail. Voir ci-dessous la vidéo de mon produit fini. Les tests commenceront demain après avoir enroulé le noyau central.

Video: https://youtu.be/m16qvt9-2Kk
Amazingly nice build Luc!

What you can do as a first experiment is mount a small magnet on an axis that can rotate and place it in the middle of the stator (take the rotor out) and upload the Arduino sketch with a 1Hz frequency (x=50 in your Arduino sketch). It will then take 3secs for the magnet to spin around once (or you can decrease the x value to something else if that is too slow).

Start with a voltage as low as possible so you don't overheat any H bridges. The on-time for each bridge is in that case 3*x, so 3*50ms=150ms, off time is 17*50ms=850ms, so 15% duty cycle.

With about 0.5ohms per coil and five coils in series, that is about 2.5ohms. And then each bridge drives 2 coil sets in series, so 1.25 ohm load. So your voltage should be around 5 volts (4amps per red/black output) plus whatever is lost over two transistors inside a bridge, which is probably another 2-3 volts or so. So don't take the voltage above 7-8 volts for now.

Just see if you can get the magnet to spin around at the desired speed of the Arduino sketch.

PmgR

Offline r2fpl

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 445
gotoluc:

Wonderful hard work, I know something about it :)

I wanted to write the same as Pierre that Arduino should be further away from the magnetic field as well as the control wires. Of course, it can work.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Sponsored links:




Offline pmgr

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 154
    • Stop organ harvesting from Falun Gong practitioners
gotoluc:

Wonderful hard work, I know something about it :)

I wanted to write the same as Pierre that Arduino should be further away from the magnetic field as well as the control wires. Of course, it can work.
Majority of the magnetic field will be contained within the steel and on the inside of the stator. Anything else is leakage and probably won't be large enough too cause any issues. Try it out to see if it works. If it doesn't you can always move the Arduino farther away from the stator.
PmgR

Offline r2fpl

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 445
Majority of the magnetic field will be contained within the steel and on the inside of the stator. Anything else is leakage and probably won't be large enough too cause any issues. Try it out to see if it works. If it doesn't you can always move the Arduino farther away from the stator.
PmgR

Where the coils come out of the stator is a large magnetic field. But test this position Arduino.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Sponsored links:




Offline Jeg

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1539
So don't take the voltage above 7-8 volts for now.


Is that possible when he uses 12V as gate pulses? His drain voltage has to be >=12V.

Luc, this is an art-work! Well done!!! How did you pull out your stator from motor's casing?

Offline shylo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 540
Hi Luc,

Looks great, One question though, Pierre has 18 super caps (1/2 the 36 coils) , Should yours not have 15 half the 30? I only see ten.
Beautiful workmanship none the less.
Thanks artv

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline gotoluc

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3096
Amazingly nice build Luc!

What you can do as a first experiment is mount a small magnet on an axis that can rotate and place it in the middle of the stator (take the rotor out) and upload the Arduino sketch with a 1Hz frequency (x=50 in your Arduino sketch). It will then take 3secs for the magnet to spin around once (or you can decrease the x value to something else if that is too slow).

Start with a voltage as low as possible so you don't overheat any H bridges. The on-time for each bridge is in that case 3*x, so 3*50ms=150ms, off time is 17*50ms=850ms, so 15% duty cycle.

With about 0.5ohms per coil and five coils in series, that is about 2.5ohms. And then each bridge drives 2 coil sets in series, so 1.25 ohm load. So your voltage should be around 5 volts (4amps per red/black output) plus whatever is lost over two transistors inside a bridge, which is probably another 2-3 volts or so. So don't take the voltage above 7-8 volts for now.

Just see if you can get the magnet to spin around at the desired speed of the Arduino sketch.

PmgR

Thanks PmgR and for all your help in the background, as I couldn't of done a solid state version without your assistance.
I'll first try with a magnet as you suggest.

gotoluc:

Wonderful hard work, I know something about it

I wanted to write the same as Pierre that Arduino should be further away from the magnetic field as well as the control wires. Of course, it can work.

Thanks r2fpl. I'm not planing to push the device anywhere close to what Pierre demonstrated like powering a 1kW microwave oven. I'll be happy if it can just sustain itself.
I also think like PmgR answered below that the majority of the magnetic field will be contained in the steel lamination core. So far in all my experiments I've never seen a magnetic field affect a solid state component. However, if I was using mechanical switching that's another story, as they cause RF and would most definitely not work in a close proximity as my design.

Majority of the magnetic field will be contained within the steel and on the inside of the stator. Anything else is leakage and probably won't be large enough too cause any issues. Try it out to see if it works. If it doesn't you can always move the Arduino farther away from the stator.
PmgR

That's the way I see and understand it as well. However, anyone using mechanical switching that would be a problem in close proximity as my design since the switch RF would most definitely cause problems for the Arduino.

Is that possible when he uses 12V as gate pulses? His drain voltage has to be >=12V.

Luc, this is an art-work! Well done!!! How did you pull out your stator from motor's casing?

I've tested these L298N and they operated all the way down to 4vdc.
Thanks. My stator and rotor came from a generator, so it's easy to take apart: https://youtu.be/iYullLkW9rc


Hi Luc,

Looks great, One question though, Pierre has 18 super caps (1/2 the 36 coils) , Should yours not have 15 half the 30? I only see ten.
Beautiful workmanship none the less.
Thanks artv

The quantity of super caps is not important. What is most important is the Voltage, since each super cap can only handle 2.7vdc . The ones Pierre used has 6 mounted on one board, so he used 3 boards thinking he could go up to 48vdc.  When he first tested he realized that he only needed around 22 volts. He just didn't bother to remove the extra board.
As you noticed mine has 10, so it can handle up to 27vdc. However, I don't think I'll need to go to that high of an input voltage and can easily reduce the quantity which will boost their storage capacity since they're connected in series.

Regards
Luc

Offline TinselKoala

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13968
Quote from: Luc
However, I don't think I'll need to go to that high of an input voltage and can easily reduce the quantity which will boost their storage capacity since they're connected in series.


Does it? Consider an example.

Let's use 100 F, 2.7 V caps and put 4 in series. So we now have 25 F capacitance and 10.8 volts maximum. Energy storage capacity at max voltage will be E = (CV2)/2 = (25 x 10.8 x 10. 8) /2 = 1458 J.
Now let's remove one capacitor and calculate energy storage capacity for 3 in series. We now have 33.3 F capacitance and 8.1 volts maximum. Energy storage capacity at max voltage will be E = (33.3 x 8.1 x 8.1)/2 = 1092.4 J.

So while capacitance is increased by removing a capacitor from the series chain, the decrease in maximum voltage more than compensates, and energy storage capacity goes down. Makes sense: fewer capacitors, less energy storage.

However... at the same voltage, say 8.1 volts, the energy storage of the 4-series stack is only (25 x 8.1 x 8.1)/2 = 820.1 J.

So in that sense (equal voltages) the stack with fewer series caps does store more energy.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline seaad

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 311
This is an earth-shattering, paradigm-shifting, Nobel-prize-winning claim

I wish you good luck with the test results Luc!
Arne

Offline gotoluc

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3096

Does it? Consider an example.

Let's use 100 F, 2.7 V caps and put 4 in series. So we now have 25 F capacitance and 10.8 volts maximum. Energy storage capacity at max voltage will be E = (CV2)/2 = (25 x 10.8 x 10. 8) /2 = 1458 J.
Now let's remove one capacitor and calculate energy storage capacity for 3 in series. We now have 33.3 F capacitance and 8.1 volts maximum. Energy storage capacity at max voltage will be E = (33.3 x 8.1 x 8.1)/2 = 1092.4 J.

So while capacitance is increased by removing a capacitor from the series chain, the decrease in maximum voltage more than compensates, and energy storage capacity goes down. Makes sense: fewer capacitors, less energy storage.

However... at the same voltage, say 8.1 volts, the energy storage of the 4-series stack is only (25 x 8.1 x 8.1)/2 = 820.1 J.

So in that sense (equal voltages) the stack with fewer series caps does store more energy.

Yes, you're right of course as far as total Joule energy value goes if you keep voltage the same. Sorry I didn't write in a way that makes sense to your education.

What I was trying to say is, the less capacitors you have in series the less you divide the capacitors rated Farad value.

Lets say my tests show I only need 10vdc. If I leave the 10 cap in series of 50 Farads each = 5 Farads total storage @ 10V = 250 Joules
However, if I remove 6 caps, I now have 4 caps in series of 50 Farads each = 12.5 Farads total storage @ 10V = 625 Joules
Do you now understand?

Regards
Luc

Offline listener191

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 253
Those super cap boards are not just PCB's, they have active balancing circuitry to ensure even charge distribution.

This ensures that no single cap is taken over 2.7V during charging.

I have three of those boards.

See https://www.electronicsweekly.com/news/products/analogue-linear-mixed-signal-ics/design-supercapacitor-charger-balancing-2014-08/

Regards

L192

Offline gotoluc

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3096
First test with magnet as rotor. Without current limitation and magnet rotor the device consumes exactly 1 Amp at 3.50 Volts.

Fr. Premier test avec aimant comme rotor. Sans limitation de courant et rotor magnétique, l'appareil consomme exactement 1 ampère à 3,50 volts.


Video demo:
https://youtu.be/w_z7tcq2N9E

 

OneLink