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Author Topic: inertial propulsion with gyroscope  (Read 21836 times)

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #90 on: February 22, 2018, 04:26:24 PM »
Set the device on a floating platform on water


you could hang it from a cable, but then you are combating against gravity.


Don't confuse the other two forces of a gryo
All 3 are part of the same force.


In linear motion, all 3 forces are in a constant vector
parallel to motion


in rotational motion, the 3 forces vectors are constantly changing.
because the direction of motion is changing
This is the angle of the angular velocity of the gyro.


If we assume the gyro to be spinning at a constant velocity
then this is simply a change in angle of the other two forces.
by applying a linear force to the axis, ninety degrees to the rotation
the changing force vector on the gimble reflects the applied force proportionately
and causes the gimble to rotate
in is case, the reaction force of Newton's third law in on the gyro
the momentum of the gyro, because of its high velocity, is far greater than the gimble
so the gimble rotates


By applying a rotational force to the gimble, ninety degrees to the rotation of the gryo
the changing force vector on the axis reflects the applied gimble force proportionately
and causes the axis to tilt.


the gyro doesn't have to be attached to anything, these forces are present in every moving mass
frictional forces and wind resistance, etc. are another subject.
This is why reaction wheels can replace thrusters in satellite stabilization


The forces are internal
Yes, the gimble is attached to the vehicle
but this is also why the entire vehicle moves, not just the rotating mass
and it's support


The forces themselves are a resistance to the change in angular momentum.
remember, this is a linear momentum which changes angle over time
we don't see the force applied to the mass that changes this direction
this is "stress" on the material.
the rotating mass is pulling away from the center of rotation
if rotation is constant, this force is constant, and also changes vector over time.
(centrifugal)
the 3rd law reaction force pulls back on the rotating mass, and changes the direction
of motion to be perpendicular to the stress, and causes a change in angular velocity
(conservation of momentum)
Because the gyro is constant (or only slowing slightly, in some tests)
this is simply a change in angle.
And this stress force is internal.


If this was a point mass, rather than an evenly distributed ring,
 then the linear force applied by the angular momentum reflects itself
as a proportional force on the axis of rotation.
This is derived from the stress force, and therefore is also internal.
The craft will move.
But it will move in a vector that changes with the rotation of the gyro.
we call this vibration, but it is inertial linear propulsion.
The vectors cancel each other so 'net' movement is minimized, and in fact,
almost all of the net motion will be a result of other forces. (friction, wind, gravity, etc.)


the forces on the gimble, and axial-tilt are also derived from these internal forces
and are therefore, themselves, internal.
the reaction force is on the material, not the substrate.


Now, at a constant rotation, the forces on the gimble and tilt are proportional


with a constant gimble, the forces on the tilt (or torque) are constant.
if the tilt is on its own axis (also called a gimble, but I don't want to sound confusing)
then the change in angular momentum, caused by the tilt, is like above
the action/reaction cancel around the rotation.
Because it is always equal and opposite.


If the rotation is constant, and gimble constant, and we force a change in tilt
the same thing happens, but in a different vector.
because we are applying a force in a different vector than the force caused by
the rotation and gimble constants.
Also has an equal and opposite reaction force, but opposite to its own vector
not the vector of the normal tilt force.


Each of these action/reaction forces present themselves as a "vibration"
Whereas the propulsion force is in the combined vector.
This is reflected as an increase in current through the gimble motor
when the arm reaches the incline, and a decrease in current when the arm
declines.


this is a change in angular momentum, from the applied tilt, to the normal tilt.
if the gimble were not held constant, it would simply change the gimble
But we are holding gimble constant with the motor, so it translates to tilt.
The force in the combined vector is perpendicular to the tilt.
And is also internal, derived from the stress.
almost 100%  of the force is on the rotating mass.


the forces on the gimble and tilt are because the mass is connected to them.
Otherwise the rotating mass would spin and roll like a ball in free space.
The internal stress force would still be present between the center of rotation and the mass.
Gimble and tilt would still occur, because the forces are internal.
When we attach the gimble to a fixed axis, the linear force of the angular momentum
translators to the axis and whatever it's mounted to


Consider the vibrations of the imbalanced spinning weight
We see these internal forces cause motion of the entire construct.
By force the vector of these forces to be in a desired direction
We have inertial propulsion.
This is why the pager walks off the table

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #90 on: February 22, 2018, 04:26:24 PM »

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #91 on: February 22, 2018, 04:42:12 PM »
I don't think the "mib"'s view me as a threat
Or they would have nabbed me up long ago....


It is more likely, that if the mibs exist, or anything like that, they would just assimilate the
data stream. (Like Rex research does)


Which appears to be the case if you look at the Eric Jacqmain story
and a few other things that have happened here, that end up as military tech.



Offline conradelektro

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #92 on: February 22, 2018, 05:36:06 PM »
Very instructive video which will teach you a lot if you allow to be instructed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHGKIzCcVa0

The guy appearing in the video is an annoying smartass but he explains well. It is always annoying to be told the truth, the miracles disappear.

Some more videos of interest for the Fiala patent fans:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrGfc-3uv7o (basic principle of gyroscope like the annoying video)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGun5athdfg  (two gyroscopes on the same axle, instructive)


*************************************************************************************

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldqUV-DXiUg (almost the Fiala patent, you have to watch this, so, if you turn the thing in one direction there is no additional load on the support platform but in the other direction there is more weight on the support platform, hence the difference in friction on the ground if you put it on wheels, hence the forward movement, but in space it will not work, still I will investigate because I will get exactly the gyroscope from this video)

*************************************************************************************


@sm0ky2: please do not watch these videos they are too unsettling for a believer, do not jeopardise your hard gained belief. Specially the video which is almost the Fiala patent is off limits for you. Faith is something precious. Have faith, salvation is near.

Greetings, Conrad

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #92 on: February 22, 2018, 05:36:06 PM »
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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #93 on: February 22, 2018, 06:17:45 PM »
I designed a simple demo device to show a more direct transfer of inertia
from a rotating weight, to the structure that holds it.
From the inertial frame of either the rotating mass, or the housing
there is an applied force.
In this case, it is an elastic collision.


Which more closely resembles our pager.
There is actually two devices in one machine
So I will first show one operating,
Then both, to demonstrate a method of combining two vectors into another vector
to direct the momentum in a linear form.
This is very similar to what happens in the gyro
And when the glue dries, I'll have a simple device that can show this.
Then I can set up some tests using different substrates,
wheels, balls, water, etc.


Another simple test you could try at home:
Is to place an arm with a weight to a D.C. Motor with an easy to throw switch.
Attach this to an object with 360-degrees of freedom
Like the plate on balls
When the motor is ran up and switched off, observe.
Turn it back on, switch it off again


Put a throttle on it, observe as you quickly change the speed.

Offline woopy

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #94 on: February 22, 2018, 10:35:33 PM »
Hi all

To smoky

Thank's for your interest and very intense explanation, but could you please insert some drawing or picture of what you are describing, because it seems to be very clear in your mind, but sadly i can not enter in your mind to see  what you describe .

to conrad

So you had ordered this High precision gyro from England. I tried some time ago and it was out of stock.

Just for info in this video (long and boring at 36'  ) https://youtu.be/sy8znYK8EXg M. Fiala himself shows a device that uses the very same gyro on a small apparatus which is probably described on Fig 47 of the patent.

I have tried this fig 47 device and it works well .

Concerning the 12000 rpm of this gyro , it is not necessary at all. My gyro spin much much lower speed. And remember , the faster they spin the stronger the precession, and if in the precession phase the gyro touches the mechanical (up and down) limitation all the effect is lost, and you get a shaking machine which goes back and forth without horizontal displacement. Not easy at all to get this device running correctly.

I am on a double opposite 45 degres device.

But i fear the MIB, i have looked for a good but cheap bunker at Banggood china but they have not currently. Can you pleeeaaase give me the adress of of your bunker retailor in Austria.

Laurent

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #94 on: February 22, 2018, 10:35:33 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline sm0ky2

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #95 on: February 22, 2018, 11:01:30 PM »
Like this?




Offline sm0ky2

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #96 on: February 22, 2018, 11:07:14 PM »
Consider the M in the drawing to be the part
of your device where the track dips down.


And notice the direction of the force indicated
by the black arrow v

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #96 on: February 22, 2018, 11:07:14 PM »
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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #97 on: February 22, 2018, 11:11:22 PM »
You will also notice the time delay of the transfer of inertia
and how this detracts from the opposite impulse when the
track goes back up.
If you narrow that distance, you should see the momentum
carry through even stronger.
Strengthening the forward impulse,
and weakening further the backwards impulse.


Offline sm0ky2

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #98 on: February 22, 2018, 11:14:14 PM »
increasing the height of up/down motion
will also have a beneficial effect, to a maximum
then will become less beneficial the more you angle it.


Ideally, you want the lowest point to place the axis perpendicular
to the surface it sits on.
so the gimble-arm rotates horizontally and the gyro is vertical.
When it rises up, it tilts the axis
then drops back to horizontal
that way 100% of the impulse is horizontal.


Tuning both of these parameters
can help you improve your device




Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #98 on: February 22, 2018, 11:14:14 PM »
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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #99 on: February 22, 2018, 11:21:36 PM »
If it drops at an angle, it will still work


https://youtu.be/4foY5r2TMOo


just not as well

Offline conradelektro

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #100 on: February 23, 2018, 12:42:12 AM »
to conrad

So you had ordered this High precision gyro from England. I tried some time ago and it was out of stock.

Just for info in this video (long and boring at 36'  ) https://youtu.be/sy8znYK8EXg M. Fiala himself shows a device that uses the very same gyro on a small apparatus which is probably described on Fig 47 of the patent.

I have tried this fig 47 device and it works well .

Concerning the 12000 rpm of this gyro , it is not necessary at all. My gyro spin much much lower speed. And remember , the faster they spin the stronger the precession, and if in the precession phase the gyro touches the mechanical (up and down) limitation all the effect is lost, and you get a shaking machine which goes back and forth without horizontal displacement. Not easy at all to get this device running correctly.

I am on a double opposite 45 degres device.

But i fear the MIB, i have looked for a good but cheap bunker at Banggood china but they have not currently. Can you pleeeaaase give me the adress of of your bunker retailor in Austria.

Laurent


Laurent, thank you for the tips, that really helps and encourages me to keep building my own gyroscope. I am looking forward to your future devices and tests. I am a slow builder (a bit lazy), so patience please.


I like Harvey Fiala, great person and he made a great video, not boring at all for me because I like extraordinary personages. There is a little Freud hiding in me. This is also the reason why I hang around in this forum, really non normal people everywhere.


Fig. 47 looks good.


My take on Fiala's device: the higher the rpm of the gyroscope the shorter the way one has to move it along its circular track. I plan now to move the arm which carries the gyroscope with a solenoid only for a few millimeters (only for a few degrees along its circular track), but very fast so that the gyroscope shoots up (precesses) at a steep angle. The circular track (only an imaginary one) is inclined a bit, so that the arm carrying the gyroscope will come back to the original position by itself (by gravity). And of course, eventually one needs a second arm with a gyroscope for balance. May be that is nonsense, but I want to try it.


See, an inertial drive only really works if you can make the force stronger and weaker at will. Strong force  <->  fast short movement of the arm (only a few degrees or millimeters) and high rpm of the gyroscope which causes a very steep precession. Weaker force <-> long slow movement of the arm (up to 180 degrees) and lower rpm of the gyroscope which causes a gentle very low precession (in the Fiala device Fig. 1 or Fig. 2 or Fig. 47 the precession is only 2° to 5°). It also means that you have understood it. (If there is something to understand.)


My motor shield is here, also a little DC motor speed control board.


A reliable bunker builder from Vienna (which has many recommendations from highly placed persons in Austria, I only mention Mr. Short, Mr. FromBell or the ex Mr. Pip, if you get the hint) will contact you shortly. Unfortunately it will not be in the Banggood price range. But with your future YouTube revenue you will be able to afford the best bunker money can buy. And you will need it. Every secret service of the world will want to get to your devices and to the master builder himself making them a reality.[/size]


Greetings, Conrad

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #100 on: February 23, 2018, 12:42:12 AM »
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Offline woopy

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #101 on: February 23, 2018, 11:23:39 PM »
hi all

sorry but i can't wait to show you  this , i( bad video because the transmission system broke and i could not redo a better video, so stay tuned
https://youtu.be/B68hP7d0Ajc

So with a twin and opposite spinning system the  sideward forces can be contained and so  maintaining a forward displacement direction

more details these next days


good night at all

Laurent

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #102 on: February 24, 2018, 06:04:31 AM »
“rowing gravity”


Nice work!

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #103 on: February 24, 2018, 06:08:51 AM »
Fiala explains that placing a second gyro, 180-degrees
out of phase eliminates the reverse impulse
and provides a more continuous forward inertia


Increasing this to 4 gyros, increases the acceleration

Offline conradelektro

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Re: inertial propulsion with gyroscope
« Reply #104 on: February 24, 2018, 08:50:40 PM »
Laurent, your latest thingy (videos part 9 and 9.5) is impressive.

I will start with a two gyroscope contraption, but my gyroscopes have not arrived yet. I gave up building my own gyroscope, because I want to spin them up to around 10.000 rpm with a DC motor which is not part of the platform which should move. I will spin up the gyroscopes by holding a DC motor to them (with a rubber wheel) and then they should spin a few minutes. Not very handy but easier to build. On the moving platform will be a power supply for the arduino and the two stepper two motors (rechargeable batteries).

My very old test (more than 10 years ago) moved two dead weights with two stepper motors (which was not a success). Now I want to do about the same with two gyroscopes.
See here for the old test http://overunity.com/17573/inertial-propulsion-with-gyroscope/msg516671/#msg516671 , http://overunity.com/17573/inertial-propulsion-with-gyroscope/msg516626/#msg516626

I attach some photos of parts which I will use.


I want to test whether the gyroscopes have to move freely some part of their movement (along the circular track) or can they (their arms) be "guided" by the stepper motors? It is also interesting how long the circular path has to be for optimal performance?


In Laurent's latest tests (part 9) the gyroscopes move back and forth (not a complete cycle). I suspect that this back and forth movement can be rather short (just a few degrees) than long. An other guess is that the movement should be done as fast as possible.

When the gyroscopes move forth they should precess upwards and on the back movement they should precess downwards. And both movement should be forced by the stepper motor to generate precession (no free movement as in Laurent's machines). But I am most likely wrong, this thing is counter intuitive.

Greetings, Conrad

 

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