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Author Topic: Background radiation reciever  (Read 6891 times)

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2017, 01:42:56 PM »
3.28 million linear feet of antenna per watt.....


We would lose more energy producing the materials
then we could hope to recover by its use.


While it may be technically “possible”
I guess this is a dead end.


Also, I may have found an issue with the base data.
Newer studies are indicating that “absolute zero” may
In fact, be relative.....
Because we are somehow able to cool a sample to
a negative Kelvin value, with perspective to our control temp.
This raises the obvious question of whether or not the
“Background Radiation” itself is a derivation of our inaccuracy
of the measurement of “zero” degrees.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2017, 01:42:56 PM »

Offline telecom

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2017, 06:52:23 PM »
You need to look at cosmic rays as a source.
Radioactive elements work as an antenna to convert cosmic rays
into particles.

Offline gyulasun

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2017, 09:55:37 PM »
3.28 million linear feet of antenna per watt.....

....


Hi sm0ky2,

You may wish to study parabolic antenna instead of dipoles? 

http://www.rfwireless-world.com/calculators/parabolic-dish-antenna-calculator.html

Even with such very high gain antennas the received "signals" would still be at very low level, hard to do anything with it (like rectification: what diodes at 150 GHz? what forward voltage threshold they have etc etc). 

Gyula

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2017, 09:55:37 PM »
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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2017, 11:52:05 AM »
Gunn diodes, IMPATTs,.......
Microwave rectifiers


Most of these are only used in classified weapon technology
But thanks to the military’s ridiculous budget,
The components are commercially available


So they find their way into telecom and rnd


I think the only way to make this reasonably possible
Is to “grow” millions of receivers using nano tech
Or some advanced machining process that would avoid
the required 14 warehouse-sweatshops to pull it off.


But then again if we compare the indentured slavery of
our current energy production systems, making a trillion
of 0.5mm dipoles per watt isn’t really as crazy as it sounds.

Offline telecom

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #19 on: December 13, 2017, 10:59:19 AM »
Radioactivity is a natural mechanism for capturing very high frequency
radiation and converting into the lower frequency rays.
I'm sure there are isotopes which would emit mostly betha

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #19 on: December 13, 2017, 10:59:19 AM »
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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2017, 03:06:01 PM »
How would we use the radiation for this Purpose?
And how do we get the energy back out?


I have access to a natural beta emitter
A pink granite containing neodymium
And small amounts of promethium trapped in corpuscles in the rock.
The stones glow in complete darkness, so there is quite of lot of beta


(If you play with this stuff, use gloves and don't touch your eyes)



Offline telecom

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2017, 12:44:01 AM »
It is already used:
A ceramic fuel pellet of Plutonium-238 oxide glows orange from its radioactive decay. These pellets are used inside Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide heat that is converted into electricity on spacecraft.Sep 20, 2013

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2017, 12:44:01 AM »
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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #22 on: December 19, 2017, 04:06:49 AM »
It is already used:
A ceramic fuel pellet of Plutonium-238 oxide glows orange from its radioactive decay. These pellets are used inside Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide heat that is converted into electricity on spacecraft.Sep 20, 2013


That's not quite the same thing as harnessing the zpe.


In fact, with pu238 you probably couldn't even detect the background radiation anywhere inside the chamber.


Unfortunately promethium is not "that radioactive"
It's half life is like 50-55 yrs or something.
(the stuff around me doesn't follow the halflife rule for another reason)


But, it's technically not illegal to own.
The mild betas I guess just cause 'sun burn' after prolonged exposure.
And it is warned to not get it in a cut or eye or anything that goes inside you.
Your digestive system can take more dmg but if it gets absorbed into a secondary
organ it's bad news.


Skin can take a lot of the radiation
(Do not try this with plutonium, uranium, iridium, or any of the available high-energy isotopes.)


Encapsulated promethium only occurs in two known forms.
Uranium ore, and this pink granite
It's not the same as raw promethium, which would still be nothing close to pu
But it's stable, meaning, it will still be emitting beta in another 10k yrs.


Nothing isn't going to heat up, well I mean I could initiate a thermochemical reaction with it if feel I really
needed to prove myself wrong, but it's 'mild' radiation? Technically "Secondary Radiation"
But that's more advanced level stuff most people don't really understand.


We will just say that the promethiums radiation hits other stuff and makes more (but less)
Radiation.....


Not much use for it except as a teaching tool to demonstrate electro molecular chemistry
As least that I have found so far.


Now, if I wanted to make a cheap and freely available and safe thermonuclear heat source
I would use Americum


Teeny teeny pieces are in every smoke detector
Collect broken ones for free
Hell sell the stupid things and people will pay you to replace them and give you their old ones
Find them in the trash, or the junkyard
Start a town wide smoke detector recycling program
Whatever
The stuff cannot mathematically "go critical"
It's perfectly safe in any quantities,Just don't get it on you


Offline telecom

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #23 on: December 19, 2017, 05:53:30 PM »

That's not quite the same thing as harnessing the zpe.


In fact, with pu238 you probably couldn't even detect the background radiation anywhere inside the chamber.


Unfortunately promethium is not "that radioactive"
It's half life is like 50-55 yrs or something.
(the stuff around me doesn't follow the halflife rule for another reason)


But, it's technically not illegal to own.
The mild betas I guess just cause 'sun burn' after prolonged exposure.
And it is warned to not get it in a cut or eye or anything that goes inside you.
Your digestive system can take more dmg but if it gets absorbed into a secondary
organ it's bad news.


Skin can take a lot of the radiation
(Do not try this with plutonium, uranium, iridium, or any of the available high-energy isotopes.)


Encapsulated promethium only occurs in two known forms.
Uranium ore, and this pink granite
It's not the same as raw promethium, which would still be nothing close to pu
But it's stable, meaning, it will still be emitting beta in another 10k yrs.


Nothing isn't going to heat up, well I mean I could initiate a thermochemical reaction with it if feel I really
needed to prove myself wrong, but it's 'mild' radiation? Technically "Secondary Radiation"
But that's more advanced level stuff most people don't really understand.


We will just say that the promethiums radiation hits other stuff and makes more (but less)
Radiation.....


Not much use for it except as a teaching tool to demonstrate electro molecular chemistry
As least that I have found so far.


Now, if I wanted to make a cheap and freely available and safe thermonuclear heat source
I would use Americum


Teeny teeny pieces are in every smoke detector
Collect broken ones for free
Hell sell the stupid things and people will pay you to replace them and give you their old ones
Find them in the trash, or the junkyard
Start a town wide smoke detector recycling program
Whatever
The stuff cannot mathematically "go critical"
It's perfectly safe in any quantities,Just don't get it on you

Plutonium 238 is an ideal transformer of cosmic rays into heat.
It is an alpha emitter and it absorbs into itself all the alpha particles, which make it so hot.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #23 on: December 19, 2017, 05:53:30 PM »
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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #24 on: December 19, 2017, 09:03:53 PM »
Plutonium 238 is an ideal transformer of cosmic rays into heat.
It is an alpha emitter and it absorbs into itself all the alpha particles, which make it so hot.


Where did you get this from?


Yes pu238 will sometimes absorb its own He(4) emissions
and in the right arrangement can even extend the half-life of a sample
by raising its internal energy after it has decayed.
But all of the energy in these cases are accounted for.


If it randomly absorbed cosmic He(4), that would be evident in the math
which it is not.


There can be ‘some’ change in temperatures (mostly internal) by self-bombardment
But the heat from a thermo-reaction is caused by the particles bombarding a neutral source.
Such as the ceramic casing the Pu is put into.
Then it is simply ran through a Seebeck thermogenerator.


We can count the emissions, there aren’t “extra particles”, which would require a cosmic source.
The rare instance where a high energy He(4) from space were to strike our Pu sample
Is statistically improbable, and would be difficult to stage the event to even test this.
High-energy cosmic He(4) isn’t that common in our surroundings.


Pu238 isn’t “hot” all by itself.
To put this in perspective: a Pu sample by itself will sit around 600-700 degrees
While the ceramic in the radioisotope thermogenerator becomes heated to 1100


A well insulated device can get hotter than that over time,


Besides the obvious point that the Zpe is not ‘cosmic rays’. It is the background radiation
Which is present when there are no cosmic rays.

Offline telecom

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #25 on: December 20, 2017, 12:08:04 AM »

Where did you get this from?


Yes pu238 will sometimes absorb its own He(4) emissions
and in the right arrangement can even extend the half-life of a sample
by raising its internal energy after it has decayed.
But all of the energy in these cases are accounted for.


If it randomly absorbed cosmic He(4), that would be evident in the math
which it is not.


There can be ‘some’ change in temperatures (mostly internal) by self-bombardment
But the heat from a thermo-reaction is caused by the particles bombarding a neutral source.
Such as the ceramic casing the Pu is put into.
Then it is simply ran through a Seebeck thermogenerator.


We can count the emissions, there aren’t “extra particles”, which would require a cosmic source.
The rare instance where a high energy He(4) from space were to strike our Pu sample
Is statistically improbable, and would be difficult to stage the event to even test this.
High-energy cosmic He(4) isn’t that common in our surroundings.


Pu238 isn’t “hot” all by itself.
To put this in perspective: a Pu sample by itself will sit around 600-700 degrees
While the ceramic in the radioisotope thermogenerator becomes heated to 1100


A well insulated device can get hotter than that over time,


Besides the obvious point that the Zpe is not ‘cosmic rays’. It is the background radiation
Which is present when there are no cosmic rays.
All radiation is a transformation of the cosmic rays into a lower frequency energies.
The only difference is that the frequency of the above rates is so high that it can't be measured because it penetrates everything.
In the case of Pu 238, it is getting quite hot on its own.
The fact that it is not sold doesn't mean that it doesn't exist.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #25 on: December 20, 2017, 12:08:04 AM »
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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #26 on: December 20, 2017, 07:00:03 AM »
Actually we can detect it’s frequency
And we find this to decrease with more mass and more time
Because it is a self-resonant isotope, the larger the mass, the lower the frequency.
Time, because it excites itself the more mass there is.
It is 8.51 MHz/ (kg/s^2)
The more mass, the slower it tics
And the slower it tics, the more energy is emanating with each tic
Until........ boom, and it rains Neptunium
That kills everyone around it, leaving Uranium dust in its trail.


The frequency of Pu238 is consistent, with or without “cosmic rays”.
Even when isolated


Isotopes do not radiate as a result of cosmic energy
(some of them may have been formed in stars originally)
They radiate as a result of nucleic instability.
charged particles in the nucleus are not balanced.
That’s why they sometimes break free and fly off.


We can cause this make a stable element ‘radiate’








Offline telecom

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #27 on: December 20, 2017, 06:10:58 PM »
what is causing the nuclear instability?

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #28 on: December 20, 2017, 08:12:22 PM »
Imbalanced charges


Nucleic particles must be balanced for stability.
The atomic feedback mechanism resembles an
imbalanced flywheel in the (unstable) isotopes.


But do not be mistaken, even “stable” atoms radiate.
We consider them to be “non-radioactive” because of the magnitudes.
Nucleic<->electron interactions input environmental changes in energy
and output a nucleic response.
Every atom functions this way.


Carbon,sulfur, krypton, yttrium, tantalum, bohrium
each have a high-magnitude response to environmental changes
This is why they form into organic chains (enzymes, rna, dna)
The former 4 are not found in earth-based life forms.
Because of our planetary conditions.




Offline telecom

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #29 on: December 22, 2017, 12:46:56 AM »
Instability was proven by Gustave LeBon in 19th century
He was shining light onto steel, it it responded by the increased ionization.

 

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