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Author Topic: Is the KICK a shockwave ?  (Read 12033 times)

Offline hartiberlin

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Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« on: November 23, 2006, 01:36:47 AM »
Have a look at this:
http://www.foxvalleykart.com/timing1.html

There is an interesting passage which says:

"Think of it This way; if you've ever closed a water faucet real fast, you sometimes get a "shock wave" in the water pipes. They call it "water hammer" and it makes a noise like someone banging once on the water pipe. Sometimes it happens when the washing machine is running and one of its valves closes real fast. Anyway, the same thing can happen, more or less, to electrical current flowing through an inductor. If the current flowing to the ground in the primary circuit of the ignition system is suddenly stopped because the circuit is broken, the current "bounces" back. In electrical circles it's called "inductive fly-back" and it's what creates the voltage spike that the the coil then steps up to enough voltage to jump the sparkplug gap."

==============
So can this be a way to generate these kicks inside a coil by generating something like a shockwave inside a coil
and if the shockwave is in resonance with the mechanical size of the coil, this might get positive feedback ?

How do we generate a shockwave inside a coil like a waterhammer effect in a waterpipe ??


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Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« on: November 23, 2006, 01:36:47 AM »

Offline hartiberlin

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2006, 01:44:07 AM »
I still remember the guy Schaefer building a steam engine
on the waterhammer effect.

http://www.rexresearch.com/schaeffe/schaeffe.htm


It is probably the same as the Griggs Hydrosonic pump effect.
Now we have to apply this to electrical current.
How do we produce these shockwaves over there in coils ?

Is a big Newman coil with its fast mechanical on-off switching a shockwave generator ?
When Newman did put 10.000 Volts DC via a mechanical fast switch onto
a very big coil, he could light up all sorts of neon bulbs around it from the
immense RF bursts generated. I still have the old videos from the 1980s...!

Maybe Steven Mark has found an electronically way to do it without
mechanical switching ?

Offline Grumpy

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2006, 01:49:21 AM »
exactly

the shockwave is in the field around the coil due to the sudden collapse

waves coming together will cancel, add, pass by out of phase

Edit: Write this down:

immagine two waves coming in opposite direction - slam together - rapid increase in field - waves pass - cavitation of field with resulting shockwave - no switching - very clever!!![/[/u]b]

also see my other posts in the other TPU threads.

EDIT:

see here: http://www.kettering.edu/~drussell/Demos/superposition/superposition.html

Field will rise and collapse very quickly - kick is proportional to speed of field change - must have air core or will dampen.

MUST have very accurate frequency for control.

More later...

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2006, 01:49:21 AM »
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Offline hartiberlin

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2006, 05:13:45 AM »
So how could this open double ring TPU then be built?
Maybe 4 coils in series pulses on each end with a pulse, so pulses collide in the center
and then then 2 magnets might deflect the 90 degrees outputed shockwaves ( RF bursts)
letting them run in circles like electrons deflected by a helmholtz coil in a vacuum tube ?

Offline Grumpy

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2006, 02:57:14 PM »
Stephan,

Many ways to look at it.  Start with simple tests. 

Signals on one wire or two wires?  With speaker wire or electric cord - two wires parallel - signals can pass in opposite direction - each induces field in other opposite to itself - can you time correctly to have signals combine like superpositioned waves?  Start with vry accurate frequency and phase shift until you get superposition .  Use coil around the two wires to detect.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2006, 02:57:14 PM »
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Online Paul-R

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2006, 04:14:21 PM »
Its back to the John Worrell Keely's hydro-vacuo machine, which looks like something out of Jules Verne, probably because it dates roughly to that era.
Paul.

Offline hartiberlin

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2006, 04:46:40 PM »
Stephan,

Many ways to look at it.  Start with simple tests. 

Signals on one wire or two wires?  With speaker wire or electric cord - two wires parallel - signals can pass in opposite direction - each induces field in other opposite to itself - can you time correctly to have signals combine like superpositioned waves?  Start with vry accurate frequency and phase shift until you get superposition .  Use coil around the two wires to detect.



Hi Grumpy,
great idea,
so not using just one wire to drive one pulse from each end,
but using 2 wires in parallel.
Probably gives more coupling, when used in twisted pair  or not ?
But normallyin telephone lines twisted pair is also used to REDUCE the coupling,
so probably twisted pair is NOT good for a bigger coupling !??


I wonder, how I could do it just with 1 wire ?

If we look at the analogon of a long spring 2 people holding at the end.
If each person makes an amplitude pulse at each end
the two transversal hills will just superimpose like:
http://www.kettering.edu/~drussell/Demos/superposition/superposition.html

But what happens, when we use a longitudinal pulse at each end ?

The question is, if our voltage pulse fed in at each end is a transversal
pulse or a longitudinal pulse ?

I really want to collide these little spinning "gyrsocopic" particles,
as if these collide, they really fly a away with a huge force and convert their
spinning energy into radiation...
I lately tested something like this with some kids gyroskopic toys,
which you could put in glas bowl and when they hit with each other in the right manner,
each was flying really apart across the whole room !

So how can we generate this effect in a wire or in 2 wires ?
any ideas ?

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2006, 04:46:40 PM »
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Offline hartiberlin

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2006, 04:52:20 PM »
I think a longitudinal pulse on each side is much more better to get
a real shockwave inside a long wire !

Maybe one could do it this way:

Have a long coil with a center tap and
apply at each end Plus 1000 Volts DC.
Then shortly tap the center tap to ground potential ( zero volt)
and a current pulse will travel from each coils end into direction
center tap and before it reaches it, you have already removed the
ground potential there..
So what will happen,
when the 2 wavefronts will meet at the center ?
Will they colloide and produce radiation at 90 degrees ?

Offline Grumpy

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2006, 05:19:44 PM »
Google something like this:  superposition parallel wires opposite


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2006, 05:19:44 PM »
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Offline lltfdaniel1

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2006, 11:06:46 PM »
wait, how about hydrogen and oxygen and then clash in a fuel cell = electric???

Offline raburgeson

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2006, 12:27:39 AM »
It's also called inductive kick, so yes I think your talking about a kick. the reactance of the curcuit would have to be able to resonant too. If all you have is the inductance of a straight conductor the tank circuit would oscillate and dampen so quickly I don't think our scopes would show us much. A cool thing is the coil can kick the primary and secondary at the same time. It doesn't happen often but it can.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2006, 12:27:39 AM »
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Offline hartiberlin

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2006, 01:50:50 AM »
Hi All,
I bought 2 days ago this nice toy on a christmas market:

http://astore.amazon.com/overunity-20/detail/B000AS206O/104-5341152-7530351

These are pretty strong magnets with a hematite very polished surface !

If you hold then about 1 to 2 cms apart and through them
together into the air, they are attracted to each other and
can oscillate very much , when they come together and bounce back and forth !
It gives an amazing sound !

They are also called Shockwave magnets...
Is it a real shockwave, what makes this buzzing sound ?

Maybe one could induce this buzzing sound with an electromagnet
driver coil and use a bifilar coil as the output coil to extract useful
and more energy ?

This would be a good experiment to try !

By the way, these are simular magnets:

http://astore.amazon.com/overunity-20/detail/B000G6U2F6/104-5341152-7530351

Try them , it is really fun to play with them and hear this buzzing noise !
A MuST HAVE toy for Christmas to annoy your ants !  ;D ;D ;D
Regards, Stefan.

Offline hartiberlin

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2006, 02:14:37 AM »
These magnets should also be quite nice
and will produce probably also quite a big buzzing sound !

http://astore.amazon.com/overunity-20/detail/B000JSGO8A/104-5341152-7530351

If they do this sound, there is probably also much induction
into a pickup-coil.
If this pickup coil could be designed bifilar with no Lentz law drag back,
we could have a positive feedback loop and amplification..

Regards, Stefan.

Offline lightbody

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2006, 09:13:53 AM »
  Newbie. The question would give that away, but seriously...
I looked at the link here: http://www.kettering.edu/~drussell/Demos/superposition/superposition.html
 at the two g'ian waves colliding...adding constructively...and then passing through each other.
  Um. I have some tenative poblems/questions. First. I also tend to think of current as waves b/c that's easy to visualize. When a wave reflects it flips phase polarity. So, you would only get destructive interfearance when the reflected wave collides head-on with a wave going the other way...a zero voltage, with no spike. Yes the field would collapse, but it would not experience a 'kick'. 
  I can't relate a  simple voltage collapse with a 'cavitation' such as a physical cavity implosion. That to me seems more like a semantic red herring. All it would be is an interruption in current, like a fast switch, as you suggest. I don't think that would create any shock wave, though it may draw more power from the source like a hard start-up, which isn't 'free energy'.
 Could anyone clarify what would make a shock wave as discussed. Explain it to poor ole lightbody.
  One thing is that  Hummm...yes, an input wave, when bounced in the opposite direction would be opposing time-phase polarity, but would it also flip charge polarity? 
 In vid. 4 (http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=steven+marks+generator&hl=en) SM says that the current in the primary is AC even though the meter is set to DC to read the output. So, yes, there is some tantalizing evidence that this reflected wave effect may be part of the operation of the device. Come on. Somebody pick up this shock wave thread and lay it out cold. Are my objections above rational?

Offline giantkiller

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Re: Is the KICK a shockwave ?
« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2006, 02:46:49 PM »
  Newbie. The question would give that away, but seriously...
I looked at the link here: http://www.kettering.edu/~drussell/Demos/superposition/superposition.html
 at the two g'ian waves colliding...adding constructively...and then passing through each other.
  Um. I have some tenative poblems/questions. First. I also tend to think of current as waves b/c that's easy to visualize. When a wave reflects it flips phase polarity. So, you would only get destructive interfearance when the reflected wave collides head-on with a wave going the other way...a zero voltage, with no spike. Yes the field would collapse, but it would not experience a 'kick'. 
  I can't relate a  simple voltage collapse with a 'cavitation' such as a physical cavity implosion. That to me seems more like a semantic red herring. All it would be is an interruption in current, like a fast switch, as you suggest. I don't think that would create any shock wave, though it may draw more power from the source like a hard start-up, which isn't 'free energy'.
 Could anyone clarify what would make a shock wave as discussed. Explain it to poor ole lightbody.
  One thing is that  Hummm...yes, an input wave, when bounced in the opposite direction would be opposing time-phase polarity, but would it also flip charge polarity? 
 In vid. 4 (http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=steven+marks+generator&hl=en) SM says that the current in the primary is AC even though the meter is set to DC to read the output. So, yes, there is some tantalizing evidence that this reflected wave effect may be part of the operation of the device. Come on. Somebody pick up this shock wave thread and lay it out cold. Are my objections above rational?

Google: freak wave. Happens all the time, everywhere, in everything.

--giantkiller. Surf's up dudes!

 

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