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Author Topic: Overunity with basic LC circuit?  (Read 545 times)

Offline dinohj

  • Newbie
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  • Posts: 1
Overunity with basic LC circuit?
« on: December 04, 2022, 10:33:24 PM »
So I've been messing around with the Falsted simulator, exploring some of the properties of LC(R) circuits.

I wanted to find a way to create a resonant circuit that would 'reuse' the energy that you put into the circuit.
So I started thinking, what would happen if you start pulsing a resonant circuit at the same frequency?
In this case a serial tank circuit.

According to the simulator this works just amazingly well!

So here's the scenario

1) input: 1V A/C - square wave power source running at 503hz, consuming approximately on average 7.2W (12A at peak, 24A peak to peak)
2) output: 1 resistor of 100 mOhm , consuming the 7.2 W
3) 10 uF capacitor, building up voltage to 700V peak to peak, and 24A peak to peak (100% reactive power adding up to over 2200 VA at peak.
4) 10 mH inductor, also 100% reactive power adding up to over 2200 VA at peak.

the results of this experiment kind of baffled me. Well obviously the resistor is concidered the load in this circuit that consumes the input of the power source. I put 100 mOhm there simply to simulate resistance in the wires (which in practice is way less).
What baffled me is the enourmous amount of reactive energy being stored in the inductor (according to the sim) based on a simple 1V input.


So I did the experiment with an actual circuit, using ordinary 103K inductor and a standard 10mF capacitor. I found that resonating at this frequency did not increase the voltage beyond input voltage.
and at this point I'm just wondering if this is a mistake in the simulator.

So either I'm doing something wrong, or the simulation is not correct.
Could someone point me in the right direction?


For your refences I used the following sim:

$ 1 0.000005 0.6798259793203881 33 5 43 5e-11
c 256 128 256 272 0 0.000009999999999999999 -0.5307912440289136 0
r 256 272 368 272 0 0.1
l 432 128 432 272 0 0.01 0.027886742432886892 0
w 368 272 432 272 0
v 256 128 432 128 0 2 503 1 0 0 0.5
o 2 8 0 4107 2.5 0.05 0 2 2 3
o 0 8 0 4099 0.625 0.05 0 2 0 3
o 2 8 7 135171 10 12.8 1 1 0.078125
o 0 8 7 135171 10 12.8 1 1 0.0390625
o 1 8 7 135171 5 1.6 2 1 0.0006103515625
o 4 8 0 4099 2.5 0.05 3 2 4 3
o 4 8 7 135427 2.5 12.8 3 1 0.078125
38 0 F1 0 0.000001 0.000101 -1 Capacitance