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Author Topic: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor  (Read 59315 times)

Offline Belfior

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #225 on: April 26, 2018, 11:42:18 AM »
@itsu:

is there a need for any protective resistor or else for the primary, or is it actually better protected from spikes and other stuff now, that it is an open circuit?

What I mean is that ho is the circuit different from the FG's point of view now that the primary is an open circuit? I don't think FG sees it as an infinite resistance, since the 2 wires in the primary are coupled together and exchange energy

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Offline itsu

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #226 on: April 26, 2018, 12:16:53 PM »

B,

as the diagram in this post shows: http://www.66pacific.com/calculators/capacitive-reactance-calculator.aspx   we have 2.3nF capacitance
between the 2 primary coils.

According to this reactance calculator: http://www.66pacific.com/calculators/capacitive-reactance-calculator.aspx  this means that at 291 Khz,
the FG encounters a reactance of 238 Ohm.

As we are working at near resonance frequency (291 Khz), we see a big influence from the resonante coils onto the FG signal turning it
from a square wave into a sine waved square wave signal (mutual inductance i guess).

This mutual inductance could cause pulses to be fed back to the primary and thus the FG,  i think, so care needs to be taken indeed to protect the FG
when higher voltages are going to be used.

Itsu

Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #227 on: May 09, 2018, 05:08:43 PM »
Jack,

i have a hard time following you as you seem to run back and forth between your testcases.

I now reply on your post #219 and specific the below in bold request:


First screenshot below is again the output as show in my post #212 (so NOT #214 as you mentioned) meaning
inputting a 10Vpp square wave at 291Khz @ 50% duty cycle.  (the white trace is the unloaded FG signal used as input)
Yellow is the voltage across the output coil see diagram.
Purple is the CP2 current probe signal
green is the CP1 current probe signal


2th screenshot is same setup, now with 10% duty cycle see white trace again.

3th screenshot is again same setup. now with 0.9% duty cycle, see white trace.  (be aware, the yellow trace amplitude is now set as 2V.  instead of 20V earlier!!)

So with only 10% duty cycle not much signal is left, let alone with 0.9% duty cycle.


Itsu


Thanks for the scope shots again Itsu! Things are clearing bit by bit, slowly but steadily.
 
 
Keeping the primary coil capacitor charged seemed to increase the low frequency oscillation and decrease the high frequency oscillation. When lowering the duty cycle to 0.9% the high frequency oscillations became evident and the increment of oscillation amplitude is clearly visible in the green current trace. After the input pulse we can see current oscillations that last about 500ns. The amplitude of this oscillation increase as the duty cycle is decreased. This can be seen also in the current RMS value which grows from 1.743mA (50% pulse) to 1.958mA (0.9% pulse). Note how the low frequency sine wave disappears when going from 50% to 0.9% pulse which should decrease current RMS but the current RMS increases instead! Same increase can be seen in the voltage trace but because of scale difference it is a bit hidden. Voltage oscillations seem to last longer than current oscillations, about 2000ns. Maybe current oscillations get buried in the noise? Based on woopy’s scope shot voltage and current waveforms should be in phase.
Short 0.9% pulse results in free oscillation: high frequency and tubular ringdown (with diodes) which means it is not typical LC oscillation. It should have the Coulomb effect: the voltage amplitude of this oscillation should increase four times when current of the input pulse is doubled. Comparing the voltage waveform of the very first short purple pulse from the 3.9 MHz system at 5V which had 200mv peak:
 
http://overunity.com/17119/pulling-energy-from-the-ambient-energy-field-using-a-coil-capacitor/msg514973/#msg514973
 
to the most recent 0.9% 10V pulse that had over 2V peak this squared relation (and possibly more) seems to exist. Well, not able to look exactly because of clipping and also diodes were used with 5V pulse so ringdowns are not quite comparable. When doing pulse tests you can confirm if this relation exists. Getting the voltage high with this ringdown means more charge will be present in the output coils and squared relation should exist between this voltage and charged capacitor as explained in the pdf. Resonant rise with this frequency should produce the white spark when the output is shorted. The spark has a distinct look and sound and worth to make a video if you can create it.
 
 
Amplitude of the low frequency oscillations depends on the width of the input pulse so this is not interesting. Ringdown is a damped sinusoid which is typical in LC oscillation and it does have the Coulomb effect: 10%/10V voltage ringdown was two times greater compared to 10%/5V ringdown. Possibly this oscillation is caused by the beat frequency between the two coil pairs? I think that getting this voltage high does not mean more charge is present in the output coils. Most likely this voltage cannot charge a capacitor to higher value, i.e. squared relation between this voltage and voltage in a charged capacitor does not exist.
 
 
So when doing tests with 10%/1kHz pulse test also short 5-30ns pulses to get the ringdown of the high frequency oscillation. To test for the existence of the Coulomb effect, vary the current of the input pulse by using different voltages: 5V, 10V and even 20V if possible.
 
 
One more thing, when testing with ferrite test also how iron core works. Iron is not good with high frequency inductive pulses but maybe it behaves differently with capacitive pulses ?

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #227 on: May 09, 2018, 05:08:43 PM »
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Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #228 on: May 09, 2018, 05:14:33 PM »
Hmmm,

not sure where you want me to add this capacitor and blocking diodes.
Should the cap go as shown in the below diagram?  And what is its value?

What about the diodes, are they suppose to come in the leads next to where i have drawn them?

No diagram in your PDF equals my present setup


Itsu


Use the upper circuit of figure 8 like you once already did

Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #229 on: May 15, 2018, 02:05:53 PM »

Use the upper circuit of figure 8 like you once already did


Trying to be more accurate about how to continue with testing..
Get the ringdown of the high frequency oscillation using a short pulse and measure the current from the free coil ends. First use 50% duty cycle pulse and then begin to reduce the pulse length. Note the length of the input pulse when the current is still high. Cutting of the drive pulse while current is high should produce strongest ringdown (current reversal method of capacitive pulsing). With ten meters of wire in the primary, 30ns pulse length should be enough. So the best pulse should be such that current is high after 30ns, over 90% from maximum. With 2 nf capacitance in the primary this might not happen though so adding capacitance should fix this problem (C2 capacitor in figure 9 of the pdf). This behavior of the input pulse can be seen by monitoring the input current. Now get the resonant rise using the pulse that gave the strongest ringdown. Next add FWBR and DC capacitor in the output coil pair. This setup you have already used once. Measure the voltage where the capacitor is charged to. Detach voltage probe from the DC cap, put some load and connect ground to minus terminal of the DC capacitor. Measure the current through load.
 
Next do the same with blocking diodes. First use the upper circuit of figure 8 without C, C’ and FWBR. This setup you have also already used in the system when you took the very first scope shots. Find the optimum pulse length as explained above, measure the voltage ringdown across the safety spark gap and current ringdown on both sides of the spark gap. Then add FWBR and DC capacitor and do the same tests as above.
 
Test the Coulomb effect by changing the voltage of the drive pulse.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #229 on: May 15, 2018, 02:05:53 PM »
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Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #230 on: September 25, 2018, 08:09:48 AM »
Some notes about Belfior’s setup which were not posted. This information is from PM’s.
 
Energy collector was a 2*10m coil using 0.5mm enameled wire winded over a plastic tube having 5cm diameter and 50% turn offset was used. Primary was a simple four turn coil. Resonant frequency was 10.3MHz. Capacitance was not measured but based on itsu’s aystem I estimate it to be about 2nF. Input signal was 10V square wave and 50% duty cycle was used.
 
At resonance 9V AC electric field potential appeared at the output. With 2nF capacitance this means 18nC charge appeared on the coil capacitor. A 47nF AC capacitor was connected in series and FWBR was connected to the AC capacitor. The remaining two coil ends were left freely hanging in the air. Result was as in figure 8 with C, FWBR and without blocking diodes. 40V DC was measured from the bridge which means 1880nC of charge appeared in the 47nF capacitor. This is obviously a result from induction. Induction occurs when something changes and the only thing that is changing is the oscillating electric field at 10.3MHz. Since the capacitor was in series the amount of charge going back-and-forth through the 47nF capacitor is 1880nC*10.3MHz*2 which is 38.7 amperes. So the output power should be about 40V*38.7A. Connecting a 3V led to the bridge resulted in white sparks and led was lit only dimly. Power did not come out. From wistiti’s experiment on page four we know that connecting ground to capacitor minus improved the output significantly. So connecting a ground in this case should have resulted in the same behavior but this has not been tested.
 
So this is where we are at the moment. We have resonance but DC conversion has not been yet tested. itsu’s system should be much better because primary was also a coil capacitor which creates superfast pulses but resonance at high frequency (8.9 MHz) has not been tested. It would be interesting to see the difference between these two systems in addition to DC conversion being done properly.

Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #231 on: October 12, 2018, 02:21:42 PM »
Went through the PM’s and realized that I possibly misunderstood how the 47nf AC capacitor was connected with the FWBR. It could be that it was inside the bridge as a smoothing capacitor (fig 8. FWBR and C’) and not outside in series (fig 8. FWBR and C) as I originally thought. If so, then my amperage calculation of the system is wrong. Belfior, can you comment about the setup you used ?
 
I stated in the pdf that there is a power of four relation between the capacitance of the energy collector coil capacitor and the amount of induced charge in the charge collecting capacitor per cycle. This could also be wrong if 47nf was inside the FWBR which lead me to wrong conclusion. The relation is ‘only’ a power of two. There is a power of four relation between the amount of induced charge in the energy collector and the amount of induced charge in the charge collecting capacitor per cycle though. This comes from the Coulomb’s law and from the second order rate of change of the electric and magnetic fields in the energy collector. Both electric and magnetic fields change with time and position so they have this relation which results in increased voltage and amperage when the energy flow is converted into DC.
 
Notes about charge collecting capacitors in the energy collector. I think several capacitors connected in series can be charged from one energetic current. Or several FWBR C’ blocks connected in series. I don’t know if each capacitor should be connected to different ground or if they can share the same ground. Same ground would create a new path for the energetic current which could affect capacitor charging as part of the energy flow could bypass the charge collecting capacitor.
 
 [size=0pt]There are plenty of options how to connect more capacitors in the energy collector, use your imagination and forget all you know about conventional current based systems. Open minded testing is the only way to advance this further.[/size]

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #231 on: October 12, 2018, 02:21:42 PM »
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Offline Belfior

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #232 on: October 12, 2018, 02:31:30 PM »
Went through the PM’s and realized that I possibly misunderstood how the 47nf AC capacitor was connected with the FWBR. It could be that it was inside the bridge as a smoothing capacitor (fig 8. FWBR and C’) and not outside in series (fig 8. FWBR and C) as I originally thought. If so, then my amperage calculation of the system is wrong. Belfior, can you comment about the setup you used ?
 
I stated in the pdf that there is a power of four relation between the capacitance of the energy collector coil capacitor and the amount of induced charge in the charge collecting capacitor per cycle. This could also be wrong if 47nf was inside the FWBR which lead me to wrong conclusion. The relation is ‘only’ a power of two. There is a power of four relation between the amount of induced charge in the energy collector and the amount of induced charge in the charge collecting capacitor per cycle though. This comes from the Coulomb’s law and from the second order rate of change of the electric and magnetic fields in the energy collector. Both electric and magnetic fields change with time and position so they have this relation which results in increased voltage and amperage when the energy flow is converted into DC.
 
Notes about charge collecting capacitors in the energy collector. I think several capacitors connected in series can be charged from one energetic current. Or several FWBR C’ blocks connected in series. I don’t know if each capacitor should be connected to different ground or if they can share the same ground. Same ground would create a new path for the energetic current which could affect capacitor charging as part of the energy flow could bypass the charge collecting capacitor.
 
 [size=0pt]There are plenty of options how to connect more capacitors in the energy collector, use your imagination and forget all you know about conventional current based systems. Open minded testing is the only way to advance this further.[/size]

If I remember correctly I had the FWBR attached to L2 (coilcap) and then the 0,047uF cap between the FWBR output

Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #233 on: October 23, 2018, 04:19:35 PM »
If I remember correctly I had the FWBR attached to L2 (coilcap) and then the 0,047uF cap between the FWBR output


Thanks for clarifying this issue Belfior! So it seems that with FWBR and C’ the capacitor is charged to electric field potential squared divided by two, 9*9/2 AC = 40V DC. Do you have time for a couple of quick measurements, my wish list below ?
1.  [/font]Put blocking diodes at the free ends of the coil capacitor and connect them together. Does the electric field potential change from 9V AC ? The voltage in the capacitor should increase. What is this voltage ? Put some load and connect piece of metal as ground to minus terminal of the bridge. For example a piece of wire connected to aluminum foil should be a good ground. Test using two different ground sizes.
2.  [/font]The primary is a four turn solenoid so it is safe to test using ferrite. Use any kind of ferrite as core. Does the resonance frequency change from 10.3 MHz ?
3.  [/font]Remove ferrite and ground. Move the 47nf AC capacitor outside the FWBR so it will be in series like FWBR and C in figure 8. Use scope to measure the voltage from the bridge as the waveform is not constant DC. What is the peak voltage of the waveform ? Test also using a smaller capacitor, 10-20nf for example. These results can be used to compute the optimal capacitance. Then measure the capacitance of the coil capacitor. Now it is possible to see the relation between these two values.
4.  [/font]Move the capacitor inside the FWBR. Use two FWBR and C’ in series. Both capacitors should charge to same voltage and there should be two outputs. Use two separate grounds first and measure the output power from both outputs. Finally connect the grounds together to test if one ground can be shared between the two outputs.
 Same test as in 1 but use coil capacitor as primary. itsu, perhaps you could test this as well ?[/font]

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #233 on: October 23, 2018, 04:19:35 PM »
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