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Author Topic: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor  (Read 59278 times)

Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #210 on: March 28, 2018, 01:54:41 PM »
Itsu, the following test sequence should be informative. Take the 275 kHz system, disconnect the FWBR and pulse it at its resonant frequency using 50% duty cycle. Measure voltage and current in the drive to get (U1,I1). Then measure electric field potential (sine wave peak to peak) and current using current probe at one wire end in the output side to get (U2,I2). There are current oscillations visible in I2 though the wire is not connected to anywhere ? I could feel something by hand with my test system when I hold the enameled wire and made the white spark. Sensation was the same before spark was formed and during the spark so something is there. I think it is the electric field and with that there is magnetic field also which current probe should be able to show. If so, then putting second current probe at the opposite end of different coil should show current oscillations which has 180 degree phase offset compared to other end. woopy’s scope shot on page 7 showed strong current oscillations with load attached. If they are present also without load then it would confirm the presence of magnetic field potential. This would be valuable information from theory point of view.
 
Next add the FWBR and 470uf capacitor and again check U1,I1 and U2,I2. They should not change. Now connect ground to negative terminal of capacitor and put some resistive load across it, then check U1,I1 and U2,I2. Again these should not change. If there is a change then putting blocking diodes between coil end and bridge should prevent it (can this change resonant frequency?). Finally move the probes from the output side to FWBR and measure voltage in the capacitor and current when load is connected to get (U3,I3). While you are at it, decrease the duty cycle of the drive pulse as long as power is generated and test how short pulse is still working (if not already done).
 
This test sequence should confirm that:
- Oscillating fields remain intact when power is pulled from the DC capacitor.
- U3 equals U2*U2.
- I3 is related to oscillating frequency and it is greater than I2.
- U3>U2 and I3>I2 proves the existence of energetic component which charges the capacitor by energetic to electric induction.
- Output power exceeds the input power: U3*I3 > U2*I2 > U1*I1.
 
-------------------
 
From theory point of view there should exist a power of four relation between the coil capacitor’s capacitance (C) and the amount of induced charge in the charge collecting capacitor per cycle. This is because there occur two rate of changes. First happens in magnetic to energetic induction that creates the energetic current flow and the second in DC conversion which is done by energetic to electric induction as energetic component changes direction between two unequal magnetic field potentials. So when C is increased two times the amount of induced charge should be increased sixteen times.
 
One possibility to test this quickly is to use the inner coil pair for energy collecting and the outer coil pair for pulsing. When the capacitance of the energy collecting coil capacitor changes from 1.95nf to 2.3nf the output amperage should increase 1.935 times (2.3/1.95 to power of four) if electric field potential remains unchanged. Electric field potential can be matched by adjusting the voltage of the drive pulse. In case this relation is ‘only’ power of two then amperage should increase 1.39 times. What is the capacitance of a 50% turn offset coil system, maybe that could be used in this test ? Instead of measuring amperage at the output you can measure the optimum series capacitor value which tells the amount of induced charge per cycle: Q=U*C. The measurement procedure is explained in the new version of the pdf, see equation (5).
 
If the above test did not give conclusive result the capacitance difference can be increased by using layered coil pairs which should have greater capacitance. Test them both ways to get a valid comparison result between the two. Core diameter can be different but the number of layers and turns per layer should be the same in both coil pairs. The first coil pair can be done using about ten meters of wire and the second will need a bit more due to increased diameter. Add some insulation between the coil pairs. More layers should give better result so at least four layers should be used. For simplicity zero turn offset can be used in this test setup.
 
Adjusting the drive pulse voltage increases the ring down which will in turn increase the output power, both volts and amperage are increased. If 5 volts resulted in 8 volts ring down then it should be possible to increase it easily to 15 volts by adjusting the drive pulse. This should charge the capacitor to 225 volts so be careful should you decide to try it out.
 
Attached is the pdf with some updates. There is a section that explains the reason for law squares (and possibly beyond) and how it affects to system, see ‘Definition of rate of change’. Updated ‘Conversion to hot electricity’ based on the new finding which can be confirmed or proved to be wrong with the proposed capacitance test. The pdf has some error fixes related to resonance and coil capacitor impedance. Couple of new coil capacitor systems are presented at the end. Maybe fourth order rate of change can be found with the face to face spiral coil system if it exists, see figure 11.
 


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Offline itsu

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #211 on: March 31, 2018, 10:10:53 PM »
Itsu, the following test sequence should be informative. Take the 275 kHz system, disconnect the FWBR and pulse it at its resonant frequency using 50% duty cycle. Measure voltage and current in the drive to get (U1,I1). Then measure electric field potential (sine wave peak to peak) and current using current probe at one wire end in the output side to get (U2,I2). There are current oscillations visible in I2 though the wire is not connected to anywhere ? I could feel something by hand with my test system when I hold the enameled wire and made the white spark. Sensation was the same before spark was formed and during the spark so something is there. I think it is the electric field and with that there is magnetic field also which current probe should be able to show. If so, then putting second current probe at the opposite end of different coil should show current oscillations which has 180 degree phase offset compared to other end. woopy’s scope shot on page 7 showed strong current oscillations with load attached. If they are present also without load then it would confirm the presence of magnetic field potential. This would be valuable information from theory point of view.
 
Next add the FWBR and 470uf capacitor and again check U1,I1 and U2,I2. They should not change. Now connect ground to negative terminal of capacitor and put some resistive load across it, then check U1,I1 and U2,I2. Again these should not change. If there is a change then putting blocking diodes between coil end and bridge should prevent it (can this change resonant frequency?). Finally move the probes from the output side to FWBR and measure voltage in the capacitor and current when load is connected to get (U3,I3). While you are at it, decrease the duty cycle of the drive pulse as long as power is generated and test how short pulse is still working (if not already done).
 
This test sequence should confirm that:
- Oscillating fields remain intact when power is pulled from the DC capacitor.
- U3 equals U2*U2.
- I3 is related to oscillating frequency and it is greater than I2.
- U3>U2 and I3>I2 proves the existence of energetic component which charges the capacitor by energetic to electric induction.
- Output power exceeds the input power: U3*I3 > U2*I2 > U1*I1.
 
-------------------
 
From theory point of view there should exist a power of four relation between the coil capacitor’s capacitance (C) and the amount of induced charge in the charge collecting capacitor per cycle. This is because there occur two rate of changes. First happens in magnetic to energetic induction that creates the energetic current flow and the second in DC conversion which is done by energetic to electric induction as energetic component changes direction between two unequal magnetic field potentials. So when C is increased two times the amount of induced charge should be increased sixteen times.
 
One possibility to test this quickly is to use the inner coil pair for energy collecting and the outer coil pair for pulsing. When the capacitance of the energy collecting coil capacitor changes from 1.95nf to 2.3nf the output amperage should increase 1.935 times (2.3/1.95 to power of four) if electric field potential remains unchanged. Electric field potential can be matched by adjusting the voltage of the drive pulse. In case this relation is ‘only’ power of two then amperage should increase 1.39 times. What is the capacitance of a 50% turn offset coil system, maybe that could be used in this test ? Instead of measuring amperage at the output you can measure the optimum series capacitor value which tells the amount of induced charge per cycle: Q=U*C. The measurement procedure is explained in the new version of the pdf, see equation (5).
 
If the above test did not give conclusive result the capacitance difference can be increased by using layered coil pairs which should have greater capacitance. Test them both ways to get a valid comparison result between the two. Core diameter can be different but the number of layers and turns per layer should be the same in both coil pairs. The first coil pair can be done using about ten meters of wire and the second will need a bit more due to increased diameter. Add some insulation between the coil pairs. More layers should give better result so at least four layers should be used. For simplicity zero turn offset can be used in this test setup.
 
Adjusting the drive pulse voltage increases the ring down which will in turn increase the output power, both volts and amperage are increased. If 5 volts resulted in 8 volts ring down then it should be possible to increase it easily to 15 volts by adjusting the drive pulse. This should charge the capacitor to 225 volts so be careful should you decide to try it out.
 
Attached is the pdf with some updates. There is a section that explains the reason for law squares (and possibly beyond) and how it affects to system, see ‘Definition of rate of change’. Updated ‘Conversion to hot electricity’ based on the new finding which can be confirmed or proved to be wrong with the proposed capacitance test. The pdf has some error fixes related to resonance and coil capacitor impedance. Couple of new coil capacitor systems are presented at the end. Maybe fourth order rate of change can be found with the face to face spiral coil system if it exists, see figure 11.
 

Hi Jack,

ok, got some time to do some tests, but your above input is massive, so will take small steps only, like the black highlighted part for now.

Using my double bifilar coil (see post #176) as shown in your PDF fig. 6 without the diodes, GDT, load and interconnections.

Input from my FG is on the fig. 6 upper bifilar coil, ground FG to the left blue connection, "plus" FG to the right red connection.
See diagram 1
Tuned to resonance (291Khz) shows as input signals the screenshot 1 and as calculated input power 38mW.
Yellow is voltage across the input coil, green is the current into the input coil, red is the math trace voltage x current.

The output is the fig.6 lower bifilar coil, ground scope to the left blue connection, scope probe to the right red connection, see again diagram 1
Still tuned to resonance (291Khz) shows as output signals the screenshot 2 and calculated output power 322uW 
Yellow is voltage across the output coil, green is the current into the output coil, red is the math trace voltage x current.

FG was set to 10Vpp square wave AC 50% duty cycle.

So we have minimum current detected in the output coil resulting in minimum output power measured (322uW)

   
Itsu

Offline itsu

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #212 on: April 01, 2018, 04:34:56 PM »

Quote
If so, then putting second current probe at the opposite end of different coil should show current oscillations which has 180 degree phase offset compared to other end.
woopy’s scope shot on page 7 showed strong current oscillations with load attached.
If they are present also without load then it would confirm the presence of magnetic field potential.
This would be valuable information from theory point of view
.


So next step is to use a 2th current probe to measure the current on the output coil, but on the opposite coil/side, see diagram below for locations of voltage and current probes.
The resulting outputs are in the screenshot.

Yellow voltage across the output coil, green the original current on one side of the output coil (CP1), purple on the other side of the output coil (CP2).

It shows an almost 10 times higher rms current on the opposite side of the output coil (CP2) as compared to the original side (CP1).
Confirmed by swapping over the current probes.

 
Concerning the phase, the currents (green and purple) show the same phase, however that is easily changed by turning over one of the current probes, so that is not clear what it is normally.
In the diagram i have noted with a red arrow the measurement direction of the current probe.


Itsu

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #212 on: April 01, 2018, 04:34:56 PM »
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Offline itsu

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #213 on: April 02, 2018, 12:11:08 PM »

Concerning the phase difference between voltage  (yellow) and current (green / purple) in the above screenshots, it should be noted that in an inductive
circuit as this is, the voltage should be leading the current.

So the current traces (current probes) should have been reversed (180°) as they should lag the voltage.
I think i do have the 2 current probes relation correct (in phase).

The 8pF / 10MOhm scope probe will cause a load to the 291Khz signal of about 68 Ohm

(http://www.66pacific.com/calculators/capacitive-reactance-calculator.aspx)

No idea why i see 2 different current amplitudes (x10) at the both output coil ends.


Itsu

Offline gyulasun

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #214 on: April 02, 2018, 12:33:22 PM »
Dear itsu,

A 8 pF capacitor has  68,366 ohms  i.e 68.3 kOhm capacitive reactance at 291 kHz.
(English usage difference between comma and decimal point in the calculator you linked to.)

Gyula

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #214 on: April 02, 2018, 12:33:22 PM »
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Offline itsu

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #215 on: April 02, 2018, 12:52:57 PM »

Oops, you are very right Gyula, i missed that.

So 68KOhm is the load,  thanks.

Itsu

Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #216 on: April 11, 2018, 12:03:01 PM »
Thanks for the new scope shots Itsu, very informative! Two different currents at coil ends (that are not connected to anything) confirm the presence of magnetic field potentials. The input current from FG seems to be a blurred sine wave with some spikes in it. The sine part is not coming from FG which is feeding square pulses only the spikes are created by the FG when capacitor is charged. This can be verified easily by reducing the duty cycle below 1%. To get rid of it connect the same ends if output coil pair together so that result is two parallel coils not connected to anything.
The blur is caused by high frequency oscillation which we already saw when blocking diodes were used. You should be able to tune to this frequency, make a sweep using 50% duty cycle.
So what has been confirmed in my mind so far:
-   [/font]Why a coil capacitor with turn offset is better
-   [/font]Capacitive pulsing is a working solution
-   [/font]Charge collecting capacitor is charged to a higher voltage than what is around it. Either serial or parallel connected capacitor can be charged. Ground connection will pull the charge out from the capacitor.
-   [/font]50% duty cycle and shorter 10% pulse can create the resonant rise effect.
-   [/font]Larger surface area in the energy collecting coil capacitor (copper tape) increases amperage.
-   [/font]Magnetic field potentials are present in the output side.
Putting next some formalized test cases (TC), maybe it helps to see some structure and what is left to complete phase one of this project.
Using the 50% turn offset system pulse it with 1kHz and 10% duty cycle pulse. Connect opposite endpoints of different coils with safety spark gaps. Measure electric field potential across one spark gap and current from either side of the other spark gap. Take voltage and current from the driver as well. Then do the following test cases:
TC0. Measure the capacitance of both coil pairs. Verify that coil pairs are separate from each other.
TC1. Air core without capacitor C2. This was already tested without current probes with 0% turn offset system. I think it is good to test it again with 50% turn offset and see the current also to get a baseline result.
TC2. Add C2, use variable capacitor if possible. As capacitance is increased the oscillations in the output side become stronger. At some point amplitude increase stops. What is the capacitance at this point ? Scope shot.
TC3. Remove C2 and insert ferrite core. Scope shot.
TC4. Keep ferrite and add C2. Again look for the point where the amplitude increase stops. Scope shot.
TC5. Decrease the duty cycle of the pulse so that it lasts one half cycle of the resonant frequency, take scope shot. Then reduce it until oscillations are still present. Use large enough C2 so that current is stopped while C2 is still being charged (current reversal method). What is the length of the pulse ? Scope shot from this also. Use system from either TC2 or TC4 in this test.
These tests will show what is the best pulsing method and system. The effect of using C2 is very important. If it works well then it can be used for power control and also in electric motors.
TC6. Add blocking diodes to coil ends for this test and connect first same ends together and then connect the two ends together using spark gap (upper circuit of figure 8 without C, C’ and FWBR). Use C2 in the driver. Pulse it at resonant frequency using 50% duty cycle and short pulse. Measure voltage across the spark gap and current from either side of the spark gap. Take scope shots from both cases. Next add ferrite if you dare. Based on the result of TC4 you can decide if this is safe to do. Maybe lowering the voltage of the pulse is a good idea, or start from lower harmonic or just use a single pulse to get the ringdown. If ringdown has voltage over 100V then it means 10kV will be induced in the charge collecting capacitor if it is present.
TC7. Add series capacitor C and FWBR in the system used in TC6 but remove ferrite. Find the optimum value of C, procedure is described in more detail in ‘Conversion to hot electricity’.
TC8. Remove C, add C’ to FWBR and connect ground to negative terminal of the DC capacitor. Test both metal plate and earth ground. Put some resistive load and measure output power.
TC9. Build the oscillator system. One option is to use the circuit described in figure 9. Maybe a fast diode is needed from emitter to collector so that coil capacitor can be discharged. Energy collecting coil capacitor should be disabled during this testing. Connect the coil pairs together so that result is two coils connected in parallel. Then there will be no fields and system is safe to work with.
TC10. Connect a properly working oscillator to a coil capacitor system to replace the signal generator. Start pulsing from lower harmonics and measure the output power. More detailed testing procedure is explained in ‘Solid state AEC reference design’.
 [size=0pt]If tests up to TC8 can be completed and they give positive result then I am sure more experimenters will join and help to do the remaining two tests. Then we will get a simple reference system anyone can build at low cost.[/size]

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #216 on: April 11, 2018, 12:03:01 PM »
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Offline itsu

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #217 on: April 13, 2018, 10:08:16 PM »
Quote
Thanks for the new scope shots Itsu, very informative! Two different currents at coil ends (that are not connected to anything) confirm the presence of magnetic field potentials. The input current from FG seems to be a blurred sine wave with some spikes in it. The sine part is not coming from FG which is feeding square pulses only the spikes are created by the FG when capacitor is charged. This can be verified easily by reducing the duty cycle below 1%. To get rid of it connect the same ends if output coil pair together so that result is two parallel coils not connected to anything.
The blur is caused by high frequency oscillation which we already saw when blocking diodes were used. You should be able to tune to this frequency, make a sweep using 50% duty cycle.

Jack,

concerning the input current from FG being blurred, this probably is not caused by any hf oscillations, but just the raw signal from the current
probe.  In the next screenshots, i have set the scope to 4x averaging to reduce this blur.

The next 3 screenshots show:

again the input voltage (yellow), input current (green) and input power (red = yellow x green) at resonance (291Khz),
the input voltage (yellow), input current (green) and input power (red = yellow x green) NOT at resonance (191Khz)
the input voltage (yellow), input current (green) and input power (red = yellow x green) at resonance (291Khz) but at 0.9% duty cycle.

finally the 4th screenshot shows the same as 3 (resonance at 291Khz @ 0.9% dc) but now with the output coils paralleled.
This is causing more current spikes (green) and power spikes (red)

Itsu

Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #218 on: April 16, 2018, 03:18:05 PM »
Noticed interesting thing. When input pulse was 5 volt 10% duty cycle square wave the output ringdown was about 8 volts peak to peak, 4 volts from peak to zero. When input pulse was 10 volt 50% duty cycle the output ringdown was about 60 volts peak to peak, 30 volts from peak to zero. The one side of the wave was about 50 volts, about 25 volts from peak to zero. These two are not quite comparable due to duty cycle difference but anyway the increase in output ringdown exceeds 16 volts, 4*4. When pulse voltage is doubled current in the driver should be doubled also and q*q of the Coulomb’s law becomes 2q*2q which means voltage between two charged bodies should be increased four times from 4 volts to 16 volts. But it seems that voltage increases 6 to 7 times instead of four. This has got something to do with capacitive pulsing, there are two separate coils so rate of change is more effective compared to plain solenoid. Another possible explanation is that FG is pushing more than double current when voltage is doubled. Just keep on eye on this one when changing voltage of the drive pulse. Using 20 volts pulse should produce easily over 100 volt ringdown. Maybe worth a quick test using air core system when doing TC6 for example.
Beware, that using capacitive pulsing with 1000 permeability ferrite core q*q could become 1000q*1000q which means million times greater voltage oscillations! This is the reason for those safety spark gaps so look out and begin using small piece of ferrite and low input currents.
I forgot to put FG driven MOSFET in the test case list. It can be done before starting to build oscillator circuits. Easier to test and it also shows if the used MOSFET is a good option for the oscillator. I will write this in form of a test case:
-----
TC8.1 Using the system of TC6, connect FG to a MOSFET (or transistor) to drive the primary coil capacitor. Ensure that the MOSFET is fast and that it can switch at least one ampere currents at the required speed. Verify that source can deliver at least 1A of current. Start below 100mA current pulses and 1.5V, 10% duty cycle at 1kHz, use the C2. Observe the ringdown. Next gradually increase the amperage in the primary keeping the voltage of the pulse fixed. C2 will charge faster so larger value might be needed for it. If the input current goes over one ampere then it can be said that ohmic resistance of the coil capacitor (which is 2-3 ohms in this case) has no effect to current. What is the maximum current (Imax) that 1.5V pulse can push through (keeping in mind the MOSFET limitation) ? Scope shot from this.
In case there is some sort of limitation with the current then use 5V or 10V pulse and repeat test.
Change the pulse from 10% to a short pulse that is less than half the cycle length of the resonant frequency. Use large enough C2 so that pulse goes off while current is still present and current reversal occurs. Use aircore and Imax current in the pulse. Observe the ringdown. Put a fast diode across MOSFET from drain to source. Does the ringdown increase ? Scope shot without diode and with diode if diode improved the result. Next insert ferrite core, set the input current below 0.05 mA and then gradually increase it. What current gives equal ringdown compared to aircore ? Scope shot. If absolutely safe then get the ringdown also when using Imax current pulse.
Remove ferrite core. Use C2 whose value was found above and short pulses at resonant frequency using Imax current to get the resonant rise. If the diode improved the ringdown then leave it in place. Measure the electric field potential across the spark gap and current on both sides between blocking diode and the spark gap. This is to test if the current difference is still there. Take scope shot. It will be interesting to see if voltage and current oscillations are now in phase similar to woopy’s copper tape system that was also using 50% turn offset. Then measure the current between blocking diode and coil end and compare it to current measured between spark gap and blocking diode. Use the larger output current side if current difference existed. This test is to study if the blocking diode is attenuating the current. In my tests it had no effect but I could only watch for bulb brightness.
Add FWBR, C’ and ground and measure the output power. Start using lower amperage short current pulses and gradually increase drive current to Imax. Additionally use ferrite core and start below 0.05mA current pulse. This power can be computed from earlier results using single pulse so this test is optional. Do this only if it is absolutely safe. No need to burn those expensive probes.
 
 --------
This test case is kind of large but completing this will make completing TC9 and TC10 a walk in the park.
  There seems to some new scope shots, will download them and check them out.[/font]

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #218 on: April 16, 2018, 03:18:05 PM »
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Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #219 on: April 18, 2018, 01:35:49 PM »
Looking at the third scope shot of #218, with short 0.9% duty cycle pulse the oscillations are still present but amplitude is much lower. Obviously they do not come from the FG. Interesting that having the primary coil capacitor charged caused so big difference in the oscillation amplitudes. Over 40 time increase in current amplitude, from 5mA peak to peak to 200mA peak to peak. This amount of current cannot go through 2nf capacitor at 10V with 291 kHz frequency. So these oscillations are created by oscillating electric field. The lower amplitude oscillation was 2.39V and the higher amplitude was about 15 volts. Difference is 15/2.39 = 6.27 and this squared is 39.35. Pretty close to 40 times increase in current amplitude we see. I am sure this will change when blocking diodes are added so I don’t think it is necessary to dig this further at this stage.
 
According to third scope shot the power used by the input pulse is about 50mW. Energy used is zero as everything is returned back to source which can be seen as negative power spike giving the second pulse. Coooool! Very nice to see this getting confirmed. I am sure that when the pulse it cut off while current is still present then the negative spike will be larger than positive spike and more charge will be returned back to source.
 
What could be done next is to take scope shot from the output coils similar to #214 using the short pulse (dual current measurement). Then the ringdowns created by using 50% and 0.9% duty cycle pulses can be compared. We could also see if this has any effect to phase difference between output current and voltage. There is a test case for this but it uses blocking diodes and 50% turn offset coil in addition. You could also decrease/increase the 0.9% duty cycle pulse length to see what is the minimum pulse length to get the maximum ringdown. Then putting FWBR+DC cap in the output could be tested to see what voltage is charged in the DC capacitor. I think that in case current and voltage of the ringdowns are out of phase then it must affect to this voltage. To get the U3*I3 connect ground to DC capacitor and put some resistive load across cap and measure power. Not sure if shorting the capacitor is a good idea when ground is connected. Maybe using low resistance load and then compute I*I*R is better option.
 
 When doing experiments with C2 capacitor it would be good to see close up from the drive pulse, both current and voltage. Use as fine accuracy as possible, let’s put that 1.5gHz sampling rate in to good use. When current lasts longer the current pulse should become more square like instead of spike. I forgot to put this detail in the test cases.[/font]

Offline AlienGrey

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #220 on: April 19, 2018, 07:53:16 AM »

 When doing experiments with C2 capacitor it would be good to see close up from the drive pulse, both current and voltage. Use as fine accuracy as possible, let’s put that 1.5gHz sampling rate in to good use. When current lasts longer the current pulse should become more square like instead of spike. I forgot to put this detail in the test cases.
Hi shorting a capacitor to earth, Lets think what we are really doing here for a moment ! a fully charged cap yeh!
stored energy but what can we do with it, more to the point what did Morey or Don Smith do with it, he dumped it into a tuned load coil
LC to create a simulated lightening pulse. Does this give you any ideas ?

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #220 on: April 19, 2018, 07:53:16 AM »
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Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #221 on: April 19, 2018, 12:55:32 PM »
Oops, I mixed up the voltage amplitudes pretty good in a hurry. The low amplitude oscillation is below 1V, maybe about 0.5V. Looking closer the high amplitude oscillation (joining the sine parts together) the peak to peak is somewhere between 12-13 V. Ratio is much greater but there is no longer squared relation between voltage and current oscillation when relation is computed like this. Anyway the oscillations increase significantly when primary coil capacitor is charged and there must be squared relation but it is somewhere else.


AlienGrey, no ideas about this at the moment. Let's first see how much will be stored in that DC capacitor and whether it can power a load when ground is connected minus of that capacitor.

Offline itsu

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #222 on: April 19, 2018, 10:03:34 PM »
Jack,

i have a hard time following you as you seem to run back and forth between your testcases.

I now reply on your post #219 and specific the below in bold request:

Quote
What could be done next is to take scope shot from the output coils similar to #214 using the short pulse (dual current measurement).
Then the ringdowns created by using 50% and 0.9% duty cycle pulses can be compared.
We could also see if this has any effect to phase difference between output current and voltage.
There is a test case for this but it uses blocking diodes and 50% turn offset coil in addition.
You could also decrease/increase the 0.9% duty cycle pulse length to see what is the minimum pulse length to get the maximum ringdown.


First screenshot below is again the output as show in my post #212 (so NOT #214 as you mentioned) meaning
inputting a 10Vpp square wave at 291Khz @ 50% duty cycle.  (the white trace is the unloaded FG signal used as input)
Yellow is the voltage across the output coil see diagram.
Purple is the CP2 current probe signal
green is the CP1 current probe signal


2th screenshot is same setup, now with 10% duty cycle see white trace again.

3th screenshot is again same setup. now with 0.9% duty cycle, see white trace.  (be aware, the yellow trace amplitude is now set as 2V/div.  instead of 20V earlier!!)

So with only 10% duty cycle not much signal is left, let alone with 0.9% duty cycle.


Itsu

Offline Jack Noskills

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #223 on: April 26, 2018, 09:04:44 AM »
Can you test the capacitor charging next using 50% duty cycle ? And then the same with blocking diodes ?

Offline itsu

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Re: Pulling energy from the ambient energy field using a coil capacitor
« Reply #224 on: April 26, 2018, 11:21:31 AM »

Hmmm,

not sure where you want me to add this capacitor and blocking diodes.
Should the cap go as shown in the below diagram?  And what is its value?

What about the diodes, are they suppose to come in the leads next to where i have drawn them?

No diagram in your PDF equals my present setup


Itsu

 

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