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Author Topic: Bogging Down the Bedini  (Read 6442 times)

Offline earthbound0729

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Bogging Down the Bedini
« on: March 17, 2016, 08:10:08 PM »
I have noticed that when I connect any kind of a load to the Bedini 8 filar main coil wires using the SSG circuit, this bogs down my system immediately. I am using the recommended 2 battery 12 volt system one as the run and one as the charge.
The rpm's drop dramatically on the rotor. I saw that last night as I was connecting a simple 35 volt 1000 uf  electrolytic capacitor on one matched set of main coil wires, say the #3 wires. Why would this occur? I didn't even try to connect another set of the wires to another capacitor. I figured it would stop altogether.

And if that happens with me, how could John Bedini connect up that massive recommend 15000 uf 83 volt capacitor without grinding everything to a halt? I would appreciate any insight.

ty all,
earthbound

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Bogging Down the Bedini
« on: March 17, 2016, 08:10:08 PM »

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2016, 04:48:03 AM »
Do you have your diode on the SSG circuit installed correctly?

Bill

Offline citfta

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2016, 12:24:13 PM »
Hi Pirate,

I think guest may be in over his head on this.  He keeps starting new threads asking for help.  It appears he jumped right in and built a 8 filer coil instead of learning the basics of the SSG.  He asked in another thread if he needed a bridge rectifier on the extra power windings.  Brad and myself both told him he did.  Now from this thread it appears he is trying to connect a cap directly to one of the power windings.  I love helping people try to learn, but when they ignore the advice given them it is hard to help them.

Take care,
Carroll

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2016, 12:24:13 PM »
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Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2016, 05:49:22 PM »
Hi Pirate,

I think guest may be in over his head on this.  He keeps starting new threads asking for help.  It appears he jumped right in and built a 8 filer coil instead of learning the basics of the SSG.  He asked in another thread if he needed a bridge rectifier on the extra power windings.  Brad and myself both told him he did.  Now from this thread it appears he is trying to connect a cap directly to one of the power windings.  I love helping people try to learn, but when they ignore the advice given them it is hard to help them.

Take care,
Carroll

Carroll:

Ah, I see...thank you.  It is always better to start out with the basic, simple device and learn what is going on then move to the more complex.

Bill

Offline earthbound0729

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2016, 04:57:35 AM »
To all reading and making comments.
I need to respond to cifta first please. In reference to your comment regarding starting new threads by me, this is done in the interest of keeping things separated and not bunching them up on top on of another in a way in which they do have some relevance to each other, but are still not directly related to the previous thread. It is my same project. Nothing to hide. I have seen how threads get misdirected away from the original intent and purpose.
As to the open complaint by cifta that you had given me advice which i have not followed and I am now just in way over my head, that could actually have some truth. Of course, that is what I am here for, to find the truth of the matter of what I am trying. It seems like it may be easy to get a little aggravated with newbies for being newbies, when no harm is intended on our part, and of course we may ask questions that are too difficult to understand at the moment, but still need to be asked. I keep oin seeking anyway, and spend money like the rest of us on materials and tools to build these projects, and it is nice to get you alls helping hands. I do appreciate that.
I can't tell you all how many of your (this means anyone who posted on Youtube) old Youtube videos you all may have posted, and actually in some of them the statement is made, "I don't know why this is happening." That is a nice truthful statement from people who have way more knowledge of this subject than I do, but still don't know it all, otherwise real overunity be a foregone and practical way of life for us all.
So in closing tonight, please be patient and keep on being patient with us who are learning a new subject.

Thank you all greatly from the bottom of my heart. We need you experienced people to shed light for us. Keep up the good work.

earthbound

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2016, 04:57:35 AM »
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Offline citfta

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2016, 12:06:25 PM »
My apologies Earthbound.  I did not intend to offend you.  Because you had never responded with any results from the efforts of those trying to help you I assumed (bad idea) that you must not be following the advice given you.  I agree that sometimes threads get misdirected but that is usually not the case with a thread about a build someone is having trouble with.  A thread with a title like "Problems with my Bedini" will usually get you help.  Then as you post new problems that thread automatically comes back to the top to be seen by those trying to help you.  And unless they turn that function off on this forum they will also get an email telling them there has been a reply and by whom so they can again come back to give further help.  And the last thing to remember is that no one can make any real progress helping you if you don't report back on what happened when you followed their advice.  If that didn't fix the problem then they can suggest trying something else.

The following is not meant just for you but for anyone wanting to build and experiment with electronics.  Your question about whether or not you needed a bridge rectifier clearly indicates you have not taken the time to learn even the basics about electronics.  NONE of us was born knowing how electronic things work.  We all had to learn.  And learning takes some effort and time.   There are many free electronics courses on the internet.  So there really is no excuse for not taking the time to learn the basics.  I am talking about what is the difference between AC and DC.   What are all the common components and how are they used.  What is the difference between volts and amps.  You really need to learn all these things BEFORE starting into experimenting with electronic devices.  Not learning them will only cause a lot of frustration and expense as you keep damaging parts trying to get things to work.  Would you attempt to go on a week long hike into the wilderness without a map and without learning to read a compass?  And of course without a GPS device.

Now to try and help you with your Bedini project, please answer the following questions.  Did you connect a bridge rectifier to the output of one of the power coils?  Did you make sure it was connected correctly with the ~ connections connected to the coil.  Did you connect the plus and minus to the cap?  If you did all that did it still bog down your machine?

I will be watching for your reply and will answer as soon as I can.  I have helped probably a dozen or more people get their Bedini type machines running.

Respectfully,
Carroll

Offline earthbound0729

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2016, 04:31:54 AM »
Firstly,
Pirate,
Just want to thank you for your Circuit posting. Your circuit appears to be the same as Bedini's except you added a pot in front of the 470 ohm resistor. I've seen Daftman's circuit which has a pot too. to help manage the trigger timing better, I suppose. Feel free to educate me.

Now on to answer you Carroll.
Quote
Did you connect a bridge rectifier to the output of one of the power coils?  Did you make sure it was connected correctly with the ~ connections connected to the coil.  Did you connect the plus and minus to the cap?

I did both indeed. Included is a picture of my bridge rectifier fromwww.circuitstoday.com after a Google search and looking at various other circuits. This one is straight forward.
Initially I used a single 35 volt 1000uf cap with only the single main wire from my #1 wire set. All of my main coil wires are labeled and matched to each other.

Quote
If you did all that did it still bog down your machine?
Not on this attempt. I also tried charging my 12 volt 18 AH battery, which did very poorly with only a single main coil, although it did not bog down. Using a single 12 volt battery I was generating about 4.47 AC volts from a single Main coil wire set.
Currently I am charging 2 each 200 volt 680uf capacitors in parallel through the bridge rectifier. They are not wanting to get past 60 volts. They are older capacitors from a wide screen rear projection TV, so maybe that is a factor.

The Neon never lit up once using a single or dual 12 volt battery. I don't know whether that is good or bad.


By using the standard Bedini SSG with 2 batteries (Run-Charge), I was able to get about 7.74 volts AC from each Main coil wire set. I never read about that in the Bedini Handbook, nor did I see the AC voltage mentioned either.

For whatever I did differently tonight, everything seems to be working, but that is the voice of the blind. Again, I have no elaborate oscilloscope nor easy access to one I'm sure, but I would like to know that the radiant energy is actually there and doing its job.
Any suggestions would be appreciated Carroll. Also if you have a particularly good beginners guide to electronics I am open. Books I can afford if they are in print, plus I do see plenty of Youtube vids.

Thank you all.
earthbound (Dave)

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2016, 04:31:54 AM »
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Offline citfta

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2016, 02:58:00 PM »
Hi again,

Now we are starting to make some progress.  You really need a pot in the trigger circuit.  That is the only way to adjust the circuit for best performance.  Well moving the wheel closer or farther from the coil also adjusts it somewhat.  But your primary way of getting the best performance is with the pot in the trigger circuit.  You can put a 1 K pot before the resistor and change the resistor to a smaller value like 100 ohms or so.  None of these values have to be exactly right since you can adjust with the pot.

You did not include a picture of your bridge rectifier but that is not really that important.  Most of them are pretty much the same except for voltage rating and current rating.  The shotkey type also switch faster which helps the system to be a little more efficient.  They also have less voltage drop across them which again also helps the system be more efficient.

You mentioned you were only getting 4.47 volts AC from a single main wire.  You also mentioned you do not have a scope so I have to assume you were measuring the AC with a meter.  You will not get an accurate AC voltage reading with a meter.  The signal consists of some very short pulses with a pause between the pulses.  Most meters cannot measure that accurately.   The 60 volts you measured on the caps is probably pretty close to the correct voltage as the cap will charge close to the peak voltage being put out by the coil.  Also 60 volts is a reasonable voltage to get from this type circuit.  Let me explain a little about how this works.

First I need to say that 3/4 of the videos you see on YouTube about this type of technology are just plain garbage and totally or almost totally wrong.  You can believe me or not but I have worked in electronics for over 50 years and worked on this type technology for the last 8 years.  I have not seen any evidence yet that there is anything like radiant energy in any of this technology.  That term is used to sell videos and books.  As far as I can tell it doesn't exist in the real world.

So what are we working with in this type technology?  When you apply power to a coil there is a delay in the current build up because of the inductance of the coil.  Depending on the amount of wire and the core material the inductance can be quite large or pretty small.   Inductance is the resistance to change in current flow.  How that works is like this.  When you apply voltage to a coil the current starts to flow.  As soon as the current starts to flow it creates a magnetic field that opposes the current flow.  The higher the inductance the stronger the magnetic field.  Since current is just starting to flow the magnetic field is expanding.   The expanding field cuts across the wires of the coil inducing a current in the wire that opposes the current we are trying to push through the wire with our voltage.  If the current were to stop increasing the magnetic field would not be expanding and there would be no induced opposing current.  So the expanding field keeps increasing in strength as the current keeps increasing until we reach a point where the resistance of the coil limits the amount of current through the coil.  I know this is a little hard to understand so please read it several times to try and grasp the idea.  All you really need to know is that inductance resists current change and limits how fast you can get current flowing into a coil.

So what does that have to do with the "radiant energy" or inductive spike or flyback spike?   As I have already stated inductance is the resistance to change in current through a coil.  So what happens when we try to turn off the current going through the coil.  The current wants to keep going.  That works like this.  The magnetic field we created is still there anytime current is flowing.  If a steady current is flowing then the magnetic field is steady and thus it is not resisting the current because the strength of the magnetic field is not inducing any counter force to the current.  I hope that makes sense.  At this point we say the coil has reached saturation.

Now we turn off the voltage.  Since we are trying to turn off the coil the magnetic field starts to collapse.  As soon as it starts to collapse it induces a current into the coil that tries to keep the current flowing in the same direction as it was.  You will see a lot of videos that claim the current reverses.  THAT IS WRONG.   The current does not reverse.  It tries to continue in the same direction.  This is called the inductive spike, kickback, flyback and a lot of other names which are most of the time wrong.  If you doubt about the direction of the inductive kickback I have a thread on this forum where we look at that in depth.  You can clearly see what happens on some of the scope shots posted by some of the members.

This inductive spike wants to go somewhere.  An amazing property of the inductive spike is it will generate a voltage high enough to get it to go somewhere.  If it sees a low resistance the voltage will be low.  If it sees a high resistance it will generate a high voltage to be able to go somewhere.  This makes the spike very useful for reconditioning bad batteries.  As the battery gets sulphated the internal resistance goes up.  The spike just increases the voltage to overcome the resistance and helps to get rid of the sulphation.  This is the biggest advantage of the Bedini circuit.  It makes a great battery reconditioner.  However it does not make a good battery charger.  The current from the spike is just too low to charge a good battery if the battery is very large at all.  I am not surprised it did a poor job of charging a 18 ah battery.

I don't know why your neon did not light up unless it was because the system is not tuned properly.  However you don't really want to see the neon lit.  It should only light if you don't have a good connection to the charge battery.  The neon is a safety device to keep from damaging your transistor.  The neon gives the spike a safe place to discharge without going through the transistor and damaging the transistor.

I don't really have a good link for a study guide for electronics or any books that are not very old.  One of the very best books you can get and even an old one is a book that teaches Ham Radio operators the basics of electronics.  That book is put out by the American Radio Relay League or just called ARRL and the book is the Radio Operators Handbook.  It starts out assuming you no nothing at all about electronics and takes you all the way to building your own radio station if you want to go that far.  They  put out a new version of this book every few years but even one 10 years old or so would be a great place to start.  You can probably find some on Amazon pretty cheap.

To look for some classes online just type Electronics 101 or basic electronics classes into your search bar.  Try some different ones until you find a teaching style that agrees with the way you like to learn.  Just do not depend on YouTube for a proper education.

And congratulations on getting it working.  I think if you add a pot to the trigger circuit you will be able to get it working like you want it to.

If you have more questions just ask.  Keeping things all in one thread helps to keep track of what has been done and what has worked and what hasn't.  It also makes it much easier to review how things are going.

Take care,
Carroll

Offline earthbound0729

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2016, 09:29:19 PM »
1st response to Carroll.
I thought I had attached this pic, but apparently not.
Tried to make it self-explanatory.
earthbound

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2016, 09:29:19 PM »
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Offline citfta

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2016, 09:45:17 PM »
That looks good.  My only question about it would be, are the ends of the diodes soldered together or just twisted together?  For any serious effort in electronics you will eventually need to learn how to solder.  There are some YouTube videos about that that are pretty good.  Twisted together wires and the little proto-boards have a bad habit of turning into loose connections that can drive you crazy trying to figure out why your circuit suddenly quit working and then works and quits.  Laying the parts out on the schematic is also a good idea in order to help you keep everything straight.

Later,
Carroll

Offline earthbound0729

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2016, 01:51:59 AM »
Carroll, thank you for your earlier congrats.

Quote
are the ends of the diodes soldered together or just twisted together?
All soldered. I have 2 soldering tools: a heavy gun and pen type for finer work, but not too fine.

Some good things I noticed with my setup last night was that neither the coil nor the transistor actually warmed up. After everything had been running for an hour, they were cool to the touch, which did not seem normal since there is an applied voltage and current of some value running through that system. Plus, not to mention the field collapses.

Quote
I have to assume you were measuring the AC with a meter.
Yes.

Quote
You really need a pot in the trigger circuit.
Got one I just soldered leads to a few nights ago. Never knew I would need it this soon.
Most circuits including Daftman's show the middle lead soldered or connected to one side, so I essentially end up with a voltage divider with no real off point. I don't know that that is essential per se in this circuit, but I also know if I connect 1 side to ground and the other to positive I can actually control the voltage output better using the middle lead as my hot wire. If the potentiometer is used merely a a variable resistor then the 2 wire setup should be fine for this experiment. I'll await your clarification on that Carroll.

My Understanding of the Dual Battery Circuit by just looking at the circuit design-please make any corrections.

1. The trigger coil never is actually energized by any battery. The base of the transistor receives its momentary power from the collapse of the magnetic field after any magnet passes by the iron core. According to the Bedini layout, at least, the assumption is made, and then proven, that this collapse and then transfer of Radiant energy must be away from the Top of the Trigger coil down through the outgoing wire into the resistor and is prevented from going through the reversed diode into the negative of the run battery, thereby forcing it into the Base of the transistor.
2. The main coils seem to have 2 components on the mulitifilar wind.
     a. The first component is when the electromagnetic portion occurs as soon as the Main coil(s) are (is) energized by the Run battery (Mine is setup in Push mode, ie repelling the magnet after the pass) as soon as the Trigger coil field collapse energizes the Base of the transistor.
     b. The second component involves the magnetic field collapse of the Main coil(s) which must also send the Radiant spike into the Charge battery Negative side-apparently-I am not sure here. I think this is in line with Bedini's teaching.

I realize all this is happening at the rotation speed multiplied by the number of magnets in rotation on the rotor.
I'll await any updates and corrections.

dave

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2016, 01:51:59 AM »
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Offline citfta

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2016, 02:52:03 AM »
You are pretty close but not quite right.  The magnet passing the coil starts the process by inducing a current into the trigger coil.  If the coil is connected correctly that current will be positive on the end going towards the base.  When the base of a NPN transistor is about .6 to .7 volts more positive than the emitter then the transistor will be turned on almost all the way.  Anything above that and the transistor will be on all the way but you don't want it to go too high or you can damage the transistor.  You also don't want the base to be forced too far in a negative direction and that is why there is a diode connected to the base.  The diode will turn on if the negative voltage from the trigger signal goes over -.7 volts in reference to the emitter which is connected to ground.

The positive going signal from the trigger coil turns on the transistor and current starts to flow into the power coil or some call it the motor coil.  As that current builds up it induces a current into the trigger coil also.  But in a negative direction.   If the magnets are moving too slow or the resistance is too high in the trigger circuit the signal on the trigger coil can go negative enough to turn the transistor back off before it gets the magnet kicked completely out of the way.  You can sometimes hear that high pitched whistling sound of the circuit oscillating as the coil keeps getting turned on and off at a high speed.  When the rotor gets up to speed you want to adjust the pot so there is only one pulse for each time a magnet goes by the coil.

Then as you said when the power is turned off by the transistor the collapsing magnetic field sends the spike to the charge battery but not to the negative side.  It sends it through the diode to the positive side of the charge battery and then because the negative of the charge battery is connected to the top of the coil the current completes its path back to the coil until all the magnetic field has collapsed. I am talking about the conventional idea of current flow.  Actual electron flow is opposite to the conventional idea of current flowing from positive to negative.  Just ignore this part if it confuses you.  Just remember that the diode connected to the collector of the transistor has to have the cathode end (the one with the band) connected to the positive of the charge battery.  That is all that is really important about connecting the charge battery.

The proper way to connect the pot is like this.  With the pot laying on its back so the shaft is sticking straight up, position the pot so the legs are facing you.  Now connect the trigger coil to the leg on the left.  Connect the middle leg to the resistor going to the base of the transistor.  Now when you turn the shaft you are moving a wiper that is connected to the middle leg so that it is moving closer or farther from the end going to the trigger coil.  That is how you change the resistance for the base.  Start your system with the pot turned most of the way to the left and as it gets up to speed start turning it slowly to the right and listen for the highest speed you can get.  For this circuit we don't need to wire the pot as a voltage divider.  But you are correct if you connect one outside leg to the high side and one to the low side you would have a voltage divider but we don't need that here.

You mentioned nothing was getting hot and that is the way this type of circuit should be.  It is a pretty efficient circuit and the pulses are so short there should never be any heat anywhere in the circuit.  It there is any heat at all something is not right.

For the most part you seem to have a pretty good grasp of what is supposed to happen.  Find you a copy of the ARRL Radio Operators Handbook or take some online classes to help you understand better what you are doing and what you should be seeing in your circuits.

I'll still be glad to answer any questions you have along the way while you are getting educated in electronics.  I'll leave my settings for this thread set so anytime someone posts here I will get an email and can then come see what is going on. 

Take care,
Carroll

Offline earthbound0729

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2016, 03:54:05 AM »
A couple of more things Carroll, and then I'll be off and running for awhile.

1. How many Main coil sets can be run through 1 bridge rectifier circuit since they are all firing at the same time?
2. Why doesn't the Bedini circuit show bridge rectifiers, or most any other Bedini type circuit, especially since an alternative storage or boosting system such as electrolytic capacitors do better with AC to
DC converted electricity. I imagine DC batteries would do better being recharged by dc current also.
3. So, in view of the end of my last query, should I also use a bridge rectifier to the Charge battery? And if, what would be the best way to connect it?

Thank you for all your help and time on a newbie.
dave

Offline citfta

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2016, 12:15:39 PM »
Hi again Dave,

Those are some good questions.   And you have a perfect system for answering some of them.

In regards to the question about using a bridge on the charge battery of the main circuit I can answer that one pretty easily.  If you connect a charge battery with a bridge across the power coil when the transistor turns on current can flow through the bridge and into the charge battery from the main battery if the voltage in the charge battery is pretty low in comparison to the run battery.  I do know of at least one other person who has a bridge connected that way and it also works to charge a battery.   I am not sure that it will charge any better than the single diode from the collector to the charge battery.  This is something you can test for yourself and see what works best.

Why do we need a bridge on the other non-powered windings?  That is also a good question for you to check out.  You are correct we have to have a way to convert the AC from the coil to DC before we can use it to charge a battery or cap.  But review what I posted earlier about the discharge of the coil.  When the magnetic field collapses the induced current is always in the same direction as it was previously going. 
That is why we only need the single diode from the collector to the charge battery to get a charge into the charge battery.

On the other coils that are not powered there is also a current being induced into them that is in one direction.  But we don't have either end connected to power or a transistor so we don't know which end is which.  It is easiest to just connect a bridge and then it doesn't matter.  I have not built a multicoil machine like yours so the next part is based on my experience in electronics and my knowledge of how electronic things work.

Almost any device has some capacitance like a capacitor only much smaller.  When a coil discharges into a capacitor even a very small one it will try to keep the current flowing to the point the cap gets charged to some voltage.  Now when the magnetic field is done collapsing the induced current stops but we now have a slightly charged cap connected to the coil.  The cap will then try to send the current back through the coil the other way until the cap is discharged.  This is why we get AC from a coil that is being powered by pulsing DC.  The bridge rectifier changes this AC into DC.  But it also helps to block the AC from even happening because the current from the first discharge is sent to a cap and the bridge blocks it from going back to the coil to discharge the cap.

When current flows through a diode there is a certain amount of voltage drop across the diode.  Usually that is about .5 to .7 volts. except for special diodes like shotkey diodes.  When you use a bridge the current in one direction has to go through 2 diodes to get to the cap or other load.  So a bridge causes twice the voltage drop of a single diode.

Now here is a test for you.  Take one of the extra coils and connect it with a bridge to a cap.  Take another coil and connect it with a single diode with the cathode (striped) end to the positive of a cap and the other end of the cap back to the other lead of the coil.  If the cap with the single diode does not charge then swap ends of the coil.  If you know which end is which (I think you said they were labelled) take the end that is the same phase as the primary that goes to the collector and connect it to the diode with the diode cathode going to the positive of the cap.  Now run the system and see which one charges to the highest voltage.  Since the current really only flows one way to start as the coil discharges there should be almost the same voltage in both caps.  Since there is less voltage drop in the circuit with the single diode it may even be higher.  Let me know what you find.  I am curious about this myself.

From you last couple of questions I think you might be confused about the difference between a diode and a bridge.  They both convert AC to DC but in a slightly different way.  A diode blocks current flow in one direction.  So the pulse from the discharge of the main coil can go to the charge battery but the charge battery cannot send any current back through the main coil.  That is why there is a diode from the collector to the charge battery.

A bridge also blocks current from the cap or battery but allows current from the coil to go to the cap or battery no matter which side of the coil is positive or negative.  Look up how a bridge rectifier works and you will see what I mean.  And then the test I proposed will also make more sense.

Later,
Carroll

Offline earthbound0729

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2016, 04:18:38 AM »
Thanks for this reply Carroll.

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Why do we need a bridge on the other non-powered windings?
I have already read and checked that all these windings produce AC voltage, so bridges would be necessary.

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When current flows through a diode there is a certain amount of voltage drop across the diode.  Usually that is about .5 to .7 volts. except for special diodes like shotkey diodes.  When you use a bridge the current in one direction has to go through 2 diodes to get to the cap or other load.  So a bridge causes twice the voltage drop of a single diode.
I have researched surface mount as being super fast switching with good voltage to > 100 volts and amps up to 30, while the Schottkys come in similar variety with various forward voltage drops as you noted but handling less voltage and amperage generally speaking. It appears that SMDs even have better values, definitely more difficult to work with due to their size.

I can see by merely using my 1N4001 or the 1N4007 both have a forward voltage drop of 1 volt, so I am wasting 2 volts right off the bat compared to the Schottkys or variants and with each lead putting out only 4.5 volts on the DC side  now. I can do better. With 6 filars left to use, that is 12 volts wasted currently if I used individual bridges to them all, while I am only getting 4.5 x 6= 27, compared to optimum 6.5 x 6 = 39 volts.
It would seem plausible Carroll that I could run the 6 filar through 1 bridge circuit and save all those lost volts except those sacrificial ones. And even the 1N4001 could handle that. I do have plenty of those and the 1N4007. It is worth the trial. Can't hurt. Trial one would have to be in parallel.

Trial 1 Parallel: Of course, the voltage has not increased 1 lick as expected, but the amps should have increased somewhat and when I connected the wires there was a definitely a noticeable spark.

Now Carroll, based on the data you covered in an earlier post related to the direction of travel of the Radiant pulse upon the collapse of the magnet field, should a series wound experiment be particularly profitable by causing an additive voltage effect?

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From you last couple of questions I think you might be confused about the difference between a diode and a bridge.
I am definitely lacking in theory. I wasn't aware of that, I only thought the diode prevented reverse voltage from occurring through the path in which it was connected.

Thank you again for your continued help Carroll.
dave

 

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