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Author Topic: Bogging Down the Bedini  (Read 8703 times)

Offline citfta

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2016, 11:55:14 AM »
Hi Dave,

Yes now that I have thought about it some more it makes sense there would be AC on the other wires because they are being induced by both the increase of magnetic field as the power coil is turned on and by the decrease of the magnetic  field as the power is turned off for the power coil.

Yes you will be able to increase the voltage by connecting the extra wires all in series and only rectifying that power one time instead of each individual circuit.  This way you only have the voltage drop from one bridge instead of several bridges.  You can also use that higher voltage to charge a cap and then with another circuit you can discharge the cap to another battery to charge it up.  Batteries actually don't like being hit with a lot of real quick pulses.  A higher pulse at a slower rate is better for them.  Some researchers say they like to be charged with pulses at about 5 pulses per second.  Connecting the wires in series is a good idea and shows you have been thinking about what you are doing instead of just blindly following something you saw or read.  That is the best way to learn.  Apply what you are learning and it will help you a lot.

Take care,
Carroll

Offline earthbound0729

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #16 on: March 25, 2016, 12:41:59 PM »
Thanks for your insights again Carroll. One thing about a technology that has a few years behind it, like the Bedini energizer, people have concluded that bad things have happened to batteries over a period of time when subjected to the pulses of radiant energy, such as they quit working as intended. Apparently, the caps in front of the charging side can help save them or even replace the batteries completely if they are setup to completely intercept the voltage before it reaches the Charge battery and then discharge it periodically as you mentioned at around 5 pulses per second.
 
Now though since we've been talking, it makes me wonder if it isn't the AC energy that could be wrecking them. I mentioned in an earlier post that the routinely posted Bedini SSG does not include a bridge rectifier circuit for converting from AC to DC

But look here in the Bedini SG The Complete Beginner's Handbook:
Bedini's Patent # 6,392,370 in 2002 does show a bridge rectifier in the circuit along with a cap in front of the battery (but not apparently for energy collection per se, but merely like you see used in parallel with a load such as a motor to smooth the energy spikes), and other renditions with multiple transistors and 2 battery setups.

TY Carroll and have a great day.
dave

Offline Hoppy

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #17 on: March 25, 2016, 01:13:50 PM »
Thanks for your insights again Carroll. One thing about a technology that has a few years behind it, like the Bedini energizer, people have concluded that bad things have happened to batteries over a period of time when subjected to the pulses of radiant energy, such as they quit working as intended. Apparently, the caps in front of the charging side can help save them or even replace the batteries completely if they are setup to completely intercept the voltage before it reaches the Charge battery and then discharge it periodically as you mentioned at around 5 pulses per second.
 

Hi Dave,

As someone who has spent several years experimenting with Bedini tech, Carroll is in my opinion correct when he says that the energiser is really only practical as a battery desulfator /conditioner. Being fair to Bedini, he has always said that solid lead plate batteries are recommended, as the common pasted lead battery plates can be easily damaged by HV pulsing from an energiser. He has also stressed that the energiser is not designed as a battery charger pere se. My experience is that all sealed lead acid type batteries (SLABS) can be charged and conditioned with an energiser reasonably safely so long as the average pulsed charging current is kept low and some charging voltage limit is applied, typically no higher than 15.5V at the battery terminals. Unfortunately, this warrants long charge times, which is why the energiser is not a practical battery charger.

Offline earthbound0729

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Re: Bogging Down the Bedini
« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2016, 10:07:42 PM »
Hello Hoppy,
And thank you for that insight. Good to know that the voltage being used to charged the batteries needs to be voltage regulated.

There are people doing more experiments with large capacity capacitors these days, so I wonder if that may not be a satisfactory method of utilizing this energy better.

dave