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Author Topic: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element  (Read 10596 times)

Offline Nink

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #30 on: March 05, 2016, 10:56:29 PM »
They didn't create 1000 snyapses because only 100 was needed for their proof of concept.  You don't build two houses if you're only going to utilize 1 house.

Funding for memristors is now being funneled into Known in the form of government contracts and commercialization (taxation) for further development.  In other-words, the taxpayer is funding memristors through government contracts with Knowm.

Gravock

The funding Nugent had ended in 2013 I already told you that and you ignored it.  Commercially all knowm  have come up with was 8 memristors on a single IC

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Offline gravityblock

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #31 on: March 05, 2016, 11:49:10 PM »
The funding Nugent had ended in 2013 I already told you that and you ignored it.  Commercially all knowm  have come up with was 8 memristors on a single IC

Look at the timeline below.  The eight, 8, discrete memristors in a 16 Pin Ceramic DIP IC is a proof of concept and in no way represents Moores law in memristors.  Lets have a look at the raw research die (second image below).  The research die was created to allow study of device operation over a wide range of device sizes. The die are 7860μm by 5760μm and consists of 9 columns of devices, each corresponding to a different device size. The size is listed at the bottom of each column. Each column contains 20 rows of each device size per column, for a total of 180 devices.  They're available for research and development.  As you can see, they didn't try to cram as many memristors onto a single IC that is currently possible.  180 device sizes with 180 memristors is sufficient to allow for the study of device operations over a wide range of device sizes.  The raw research die itself is much smaller than the package of the IC.  Once again, this doesn't represent moores law in memristors.

Gravock
« Last Edit: March 06, 2016, 05:27:47 AM by gravityblock »

Offline Nink

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #32 on: March 06, 2016, 01:14:45 AM »
So you agree they have no funding and the best they have made is an 8 bit Memristor. If we use them as a baseline the best they can hope for is 256 bits no parity. I was generous and took UC lab results and stated 3200 Synapse but as everyone knows what is achievable in a lab, in no  way reflects anywhere close to what is commercially achievable.


Edit
I guess your silence is agreement.  Get back to me in 10 years.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2016, 03:42:33 AM by Nink »

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #32 on: March 06, 2016, 01:14:45 AM »
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Offline gravityblock

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #33 on: March 06, 2016, 04:14:48 AM »
So you agree they have no funding and the best they have made is an 8 bit Memristor. If we use them as a baseline the best we can hope for is 256 bits or 8 bytes no parity. I was generous and took UC lab results that no in way reflects anywhere close to what is commercially achievable.

No, I don't agree with you.  There are 180 devices on the raw research die of varying sizes ranging from 1 to 30 micrometers with 180 memristors on it (see images below). Each device has 1 memristor.  By taking the smallest device consisting of 1 memristor, which is 1 square micrometer (see image below), then it is theoretically possible to place at least 45,270,000 devices with a memristor on a 45.28 mm2 die.  This isn't taking into account half of the surface area of the die that isn't being utilized, so we'll say this unused surface area will make up the space between the 45,270,000 memristor devices (5,658,750 byte memristor).  The current die is a proof of concept for research and develepment due to popular demand and the number of memristors on it doesn't reflect how many memristors can be placed on the die.

Gravock

Offline gravityblock

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #34 on: March 06, 2016, 04:51:37 AM »
Edit
I guess your silence is agreement.  Get back to me in 10 years.

My 3 hour of silence was because I had to drive out to the lake house (2 hour drive round trip) to bring a few things (stove, small refrigerator, misc. items) back to the house.

Gravock

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #34 on: March 06, 2016, 04:51:37 AM »
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Offline Nink

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #35 on: March 06, 2016, 05:43:49 AM »
No, I don't agree with you.  There are 180 devices on the raw research die of varying sizes ranging from 1 to 30 micrometers with 180 memristors on it (see images below). Each device has 1 memristor.  By taking the smallest device consisting of 1 memristor, which is 1 square micrometer (see image below), then it is theoretically possible to place at least 45,270,000 devices with a memristor on a 45.28 mm2 die.  This isn't taking into account half of the surface area of the die that isn't being utilized, so we'll say this unused surface area will make up the space between the 45,270,000 memristor devices (5,658,750 byte memristor).  The current die is a proof of concept for research and develepment due to popular demand and the number of memristors on it doesn't reflect how many memristors can be placed on the die.

Gravock

It is now obvious that you have absolutely no understanding of what a wafer of raw dies is and how the semiconducter device packaging process actually works.
All I can do now is wish you luck with your memristor recommendations and future investments in memristor technology.

Offline gravityblock

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #36 on: March 06, 2016, 06:01:21 AM »
It is now obvious that you have absolutely no understanding of what a wafer of raw dies is and how the semiconducter device packaging process actually works.
All I can do now is wish you luck with your memristor recommendations and future investments in memristor technology.

ROFLMAO!!!  The above isn't a scientific or mathematical rebuttal.  The 16 pin IC has 8 devices with 8 memristors (1 memristor per device) and the raw research die has 180 devices with 180 memristors (1 memristor per device).  The IC and the raw research die don't correlate with each other in regards to the number of devices and memristors.  The number of devices and memristors, along with the theoretical limits of such, has nothing to do with how the semiconductor device packaging process actually works.  Another red herring from you.

Gravock

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #36 on: March 06, 2016, 06:01:21 AM »
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Offline gravityblock

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #37 on: March 06, 2016, 07:00:57 AM »
Reference:  (CNN) So long, transistor: How the 'memristor' could revolutionize electronics

In a transistor, once the flow of electrons is interrupted by, say, cutting the power, all information is lost. But a memristor can remember the amount of charge that was flowing through it, and much like a memory stick it will retain the data even when the power is turned off.

This can pave the way for computers that will instantly turn on and off like a light bulb and never lose data: the RAM, or memory, will no longer be erased when the machine is turned off, without the need to save anything to hard drives as with current technology.  But memristors have another fundamental difference compared with transistors: they can escape the boundaries of binary code.

There is a physical limit to the number of transistors that we can pack on a chip, and we are already approaching the miniaturization threshold of this technology. It is inevitable that, one day, we will need to move away from silicon based computing.

The memristor technology is a candidate for this crucial step: "It could mean the end of the silicon era, giving us lower power consumption, the ability to compute more information, increased data storage and completely new logic patterns for our computers," says Rupp.

Memristors don't require a silicon layer and different materials can be used as a substrate. This could create a new class of microchips, that could eventually be integrated in everyday items such as windows, clothes or even coffee cups.  Once again, this has nothing to do with how the semiconductor device packaging process actually works.

Gravock

Offline gravityblock

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #38 on: March 06, 2016, 06:23:25 PM »
Meet The Memcomputer: The Brain-Like Alternative to Quantum Computing

Di Ventra explains that this very sort of problem, which could take our most advanced computer decades, could take a memcomputer only seconds.

Gravock

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #38 on: March 06, 2016, 06:23:25 PM »
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Offline gravityblock

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Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #40 on: March 06, 2016, 09:12:53 PM »
How a single memristor can perform all logic operations via spike operations and how a memristor with two detectable hysteresis curves can be used to store more than two values.

Gravock

IMPLY based logic functions with a memristor, awesome! All of these functions so far rely on the logical IMPLY function, which can be achieved by applying a read/condition voltage to one memristor and a write/set voltage to another. As the IMPLY function is a universal logic functions, all logic functions can be derived from a series of condition and set voltages.  A single memristor to perform all logic operations!  How many transistors would that take, LOL?  Transistor count for generic logic functions based on static CMOS implementation

Gravock

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: The Fourth Fundamental Passive Circuit Element
« Reply #40 on: March 06, 2016, 09:12:53 PM »
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