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Author Topic: Is Magnetic 'Leverage' Possible With An Air Gap?  (Read 4982 times)

Offline Eighthman

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Is Magnetic 'Leverage' Possible With An Air Gap?
« on: March 03, 2016, 06:24:45 PM »
All attempts at using magnets to create free energy seem to be based on the idea that a magnetic field can be 'leveraged" i.e. that a strong magnetic field can somehow be controlled by a weaker one.


The Kunel patent seems to be based on this idea, using a small air gap wound with a coil around it to switch a much larger magnetic field into a ferrous core.  A narrow coil of many turns can concentrate a magnetic field in one small area so this idea may be worth looking at.


Is there any academic evidence about air gaps being able to do this?  Kunel claimed current readings backed him up. This would be different from Bearden's MEG ( a device that seems to be based on a misunderstanding of how magnetic amplifiers work)

Offline Berto3

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Re: Is Magnetic 'Leverage' Possible With An Air Gap?
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2016, 12:41:03 AM »
@ Eightman. My efforts, last months, to reach magnetic leverage with a weak electromagnetic field triggering or controlling strong PM fields failed.
I made a small Kunel replication and tested the influence of an airgap with a narrow coil as 'fluxswitcher' to the ferrite core. No registration of leverage in the pickup coils. I tested also 2 fluxswitchers at both sides of the core with the pickup coils. This is more promissing; the experiments are not yet finished. The ingredients are there, now the right cooking.

Offline Eighthman

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Re: Is Magnetic 'Leverage' Possible With An Air Gap?
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2016, 08:15:42 PM »
Here's my further reasoning about the Kunel device:  first, ferrite cores may not be the way to go - and i say that after observing what seems like much better induction created by stroking a steel bolt surrounded by a coil rather than the ferrite rod I carefully bought.


Second, maybe the trick to this device is not 'leverage' per se but rather the temporary 'storage' of magnetic domains in the ferrous material. By that I mean, deflecting the permanent magnet's field may require as much energy as the magnet would transfer to the ferrous material , in the same amount of time - no 'leverage'!  However, the steel/ferrous material might 'fill up' with aligned domains from the magnet and then dump them when the deflection coil is triggered - hence, a gain over what the magnet managed to do with the air gap in its way.


I like your idea of side mounted coils for the deflection.

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Is Magnetic 'Leverage' Possible With An Air Gap?
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2016, 10:27:05 PM »
Here's my further reasoning about the Kunel device:  first, ferrite cores may not be the way to go - and i say that after observing what seems like much better induction created by stroking a steel bolt surrounded by a coil rather than the ferrite rod I carefully bought.


Second, maybe the trick to this device is not 'leverage' per se but rather the temporary 'storage' of magnetic domains in the ferrous material. By that I mean, deflecting the permanent magnet's field may require as much energy as the magnet would transfer to the ferrous material , in the same amount of time - no 'leverage'!  However, the steel/ferrous material might 'fill up' with aligned domains from the magnet and then dump them when the deflection coil is triggered - hence, a gain over what the magnet managed to do with the air gap in its way.


I like your idea of side mounted coils for the deflection.

Would that not be like a Flux Capacitor?  Ha ha.
 
But seriously...if it was able to store magnetic flux then...I suppose it really would be.
 
Bill
 
PS  I used to watch Tobor The Eightman when I was a kid.  It was not until later that I realized that Tobor is Robot spelled backwards, ha ha.

Offline Berto3

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Re: Is Magnetic 'Leverage' Possible With An Air Gap?
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2016, 01:54:17 AM »
Eightman "a strong magnetic field can somehow be controlled by a weaker one"

The attempt, in my last project, was an electromagnet push/pulling a big magnet in a linear movement. The bar magnet moves in a tube with at both sides a bumper magnet. The magnetic (weak) flux of the electromagnet controls the (strong) flux of the bar magnet in a reciprocating movement. Magnetic induction of the bar magnet in the pick-coils, around the tube, should generate more current than used for the 'motor' coil. Keeping the bar magnet in a resonance movement makes that I need even lesser current in the motor coil.
This is not a Kunel imitation but the principle of a 'fluxistor' in a magneto mechanical way.
The outcome of this experiment was that I didn't get enough power out of the pick-up coils to feed the (resonator) circuit. Because of the mass of the bar magnet the resonance frequency was 20Hz.
This experiment can be successful with a stronger magnet moving frictionless in the tube and having the right pickup coils. Magnetic flux switching is the most promising thing i did.
http://www.laboratoiredesynthese.com/2016/01/18/20-hz-resonance/