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Gravity powered devices => Gravity powered devices => Topic started by: iacob alex on February 11, 2016, 06:05:17 PM

Title: Play Atwood machine...
Post by: iacob alex on February 11, 2016, 06:05:17 PM
.....with rotational inertia , at :
     http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/AtwoodsMachineWithRotationalInertia/
     It can be an intermediate step from an Atwood machine to a possible self-powered gravity machine...to add a flywheel as the transitory in-out storage of the mechanical motion.
     Al_ex
Title: Re: Play Atwood machine...
Post by: sm0ky2 on February 11, 2016, 06:32:36 PM
Anyone else see something interesting here?
(tearing the house up looking for more pulleys, or stuff to make pulleys....)

What we know about pulleys, and the conservational energy dynamics of a gravitational field potential
E=mgh of the weights, leverage, and balance.

do not take into consideration, the angular momentum of the pulley......

Title: Re: Play Atwood machine...
Post by: sm0ky2 on February 11, 2016, 06:49:35 PM
I mean, yes there is the moment of inertia, and the energy required to start the wheel into motion, which takes away from the leverage force, to a calculable negligible amount.

but the acceleration of the pulley mass is (negating friction) controlled by the gravitational force.
since pi are round, the radius and the mass, when much larger than the mass and distances involved in the leveraged weight system, can present themselves as momentum quantities which can be added to the momentum of the falling heavier weight, to derive total system energy output.

It would appear that Mr. Atwood may have something here worth investigating.
If for no other purpose, than another gravitational learning experience.

Title: Re: Play Atwood machine...
Post by: sm0ky2 on February 11, 2016, 06:59:53 PM
heres the math

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atwood_machine (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atwood_machine)

When they present this in a lab, the pulley is made of something light weight. and the weights heavy.
because it was designed to demonstrate how a pulley works.