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Mechanical free energy devices => mechanic => Topic started by: Jowik on October 27, 2006, 11:25:36 PM

Title: A possible "Steorn" design...
Post by: Jowik on October 27, 2006, 11:25:36 PM
I am going to post the design concept idea I figure may be part of Steorn's secret OU device.

We all know if we have two cylindrical magnets that are parallel to each other (we'll call this the rail), separated, north-south one side and south-north on one side, that if you place another magnet between the two (called the driver), starting with like poles, if you push the driver magnet past the "sticking" point of the rail magnets, the driver magnet is drawn towards the opposite end of the rail magnets. I've actually tested this with small magnets using cardboard (it was all I could find), and the force at which the driver magnet moves towards the end was extremely fast... in the blink of an eye for a travel length of about 2 inches. The beauty about this configuration is that it was repeatable, easy to start and control with very little "structure" to the device.

The problems with constructing devices using this pattern is the simple fact it takes greater force to push the driver magnet past the sticking point, and the sticking point is the result of like-pole repulsion or the opposite-pole attraction. Also, rails that are too long tend to exhibit weaker forces of attraction.

Consider the construction of the fields in such a way that the rail magnets are positioned to move a semi-spiral pattern of driver magnets (attached to an aluminum tube for visualization purposes) so that the driver magnets enter the rail just past the sticking point. While one driver moves along the path of a rail, just before the driver hits the sticking point, another driver magnet enters another rail past the sticking point. In other words, the closed system would use the forces of the rails perpendicular to the forces required to move past the rail's sticking point. The tube of magnets positioned will be moving up the rails in a step like fashion, so we'll have motion in one direction, then motion in a perpendicular direction until the tube moves past the rails. For testing purposes, gravity could be used to bring the set back down to start again. A device could also be constructed where a magnet at the end of the rails will reposition the tube of driver magnets.

Note for a better picture: the rail magnets that rotate the tube would have to be curved relative to the shape of the tube, and forces are not pushing past the sticking points, but are rather going around...

I was able to put a very basic and crude model of what I was trying to explain... This is JUST A CONCEPT... let me know what you think.

(http://www.globaltrb.org/TECHREVFORUM/extensions/InlineImages/image.php?AttachmentID=8)

I figure that it would be better to create a pattern of driver magnets so that while the tube rotates, it also oscillates up and down (or left to right depending on how you look at it). This is the only design of permanent mangets that I can think of that have trajectories other than a circular path. So in consideration of what Steorn has stated, the technology has different angles of measurement to consider for the full thermodynamic analaysis.

If someone who is an engineer, would perhaps elaborate on the possibility, that would be great and thank you.   Sorry if this post is a bit convoluted, it was compiled from a bunch of posts I made on different forums.

Cheers,

John
Title: Re: A possible "Steorn" design...
Post by: Liberty on October 28, 2006, 05:39:45 AM
I am going to post the design concept idea I figure may be part of Steorn's secret OU device.

We all know if we have two cylindrical magnets that are parallel to each other (we'll call this the rail), separated, north-south one side and south-north on one side, that if you place another magnet between the two (called the driver), starting with like poles, if you push the driver magnet past the "sticking" point of the rail magnets, the driver magnet is drawn towards the opposite end of the rail magnets. I've actually tested this with small magnets using cardboard (it was all I could find), and the force at which the driver magnet moves towards the end was extremely fast... in the blink of an eye for a travel length of about 2 inches. The beauty about this configuration is that it was repeatable, easy to start and control with very little "structure" to the device.

The problems with constructing devices using this pattern is the simple fact it takes greater force to push the driver magnet past the sticking point, and the sticking point is the result of like-pole repulsion or the opposite-pole attraction. Also, rails that are too long tend to exhibit weaker forces of attraction.

Consider the construction of the fields in such a way that the rail magnets are positioned to move a semi-spiral pattern of driver magnets (attached to an aluminum tube for visualization purposes) so that the driver magnets enter the rail just past the sticking point. While one driver moves along the path of a rail, just before the driver hits the sticking point, another driver magnet enters another rail past the sticking point. In other words, the closed system would use the forces of the rails perpendicular to the forces required to move past the rail's sticking point. The tube of magnets positioned will be moving up the rails in a step like fashion, so we'll have motion in one direction, then motion in a perpendicular direction until the tube moves past the rails. For testing purposes, gravity could be used to bring the set back down to start again. A device could also be constructed where a magnet at the end of the rails will reposition the tube of driver magnets.

Note for a better picture: the rail magnets that rotate the tube would have to be curved relative to the shape of the tube, and forces are not pushing past the sticking points, but are rather going around...

I was able to put a very basic and crude model of what I was trying to explain... This is JUST A CONCEPT... let me know what you think.

(http://www.globaltrb.org/TECHREVFORUM/extensions/InlineImages/image.php?AttachmentID=8)

I figure that it would be better to create a pattern of driver magnets so that while the tube rotates, it also oscillates up and down (or left to right depending on how you look at it). This is the only design of permanent mangets that I can think of that have trajectories other than a circular path. So in consideration of what Steorn has stated, the technology has different angles of measurement to consider for the full thermodynamic analaysis.

If someone who is an engineer, would perhaps elaborate on the possibility, that would be great and thank you.   Sorry if this post is a bit convoluted, it was compiled from a bunch of posts I made on different forums.

Cheers,

John


Hi Jowik,

Very good looking picture.  What did you use to make it?  Will it animate movement too?
Title: Re: A possible "Steorn" design...
Post by: Jowik on October 28, 2006, 03:00:52 PM
Quote
Very good looking picture.  What did you use to make it?  Will it animate movement too?

Hi Liberty,

http://www.blender.org - it's free and open source, and it does animation.  It's available in many platforms as well.  I haven't had time to learn the software, but there's alot in there including python scripts, which are really cool.