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Solid States Devices => Tesla Technologgy => Topic started by: synchro1 on October 09, 2015, 04:57:50 PM

Title: A.C. Tesla bifilar ferrite rotor attraction motor.
Post by: synchro1 on October 09, 2015, 04:57:50 PM
I need to start this new thread because I drifted too far from the Morin topic.

Consider the constant magnetic field strength of A.C. current in a bifilar power coil compared to the interruption of a pulsed D.C. current: There's no magnetic field generated by the dead spaces between the D.C. pulses. A.C. has an obvious advantage over pulsed D.C. because the attraction field to ferrite is constant not fluctuating. The A.C. polarity is oscillating but the ferrite rotor is blind to it and benefits from both sides of the field.   
Title: Re: A.C. Tesla bifilar ferrite rotor attraction motor.
Post by: synchro1 on October 09, 2015, 11:01:23 PM
I'm considering an  A.C. automotive relay to replace the A.C. Reed switch. The relay can be wired to chatter. This may drive the A.C. attraction motor even more handily!

"AC and DC relays work on the same principle, that of, electromagnetic induction. However, there are some differences in construction. DC relays have something known as the freewheel diode which acts to discharge the emf built in the inductance when the coil is de-energized. AC relays have cores which are laminated to prevent losses due to eddy current heating.

Another more conspicuous difference between a DC relay and an AC relay is presence of the Shading Coil. In AC relays, the alternating current supply changes direction about 100 times a second. At each instance, when the sine wave passes through zero, the current flowing through the coil becomes zero. This results in a loss of magnetism for a few milliseconds. When this happens about 100 times a second, the repeated drop and pickup of the coil produces a noise known as chattering. This also leads to the making and breaking of the relay contacts leading to disturbances in the connected electric circuits.

A shading coil is a coil with high remnance. thus when the magnetism of the coil collapses when the current becomes zero. The shading coil still retains the magnetism. Thus, ensuring that the contacts do not drop off".

The A.C. magnetic attraction field is not constant after all, but perhaps closer to a 90% duty cycle.

"At each instance, when the sine wave passes through zero, the current flowing through the coil becomes zero. This results in a loss of magnetism for a few milliseconds".

The A.C. relay can wire between the wall outlet and a coreless synchronous motor coil from the washing machine drain motor. This one could probably whip a tire iron around at chatter R.P.M. I plan to try this.


 








 










 



   

 
 
 

 


 
   

 
 
 

 


 
Title: Re: A.C. Tesla bifilar ferrite rotor attraction motor.
Post by: synchro1 on October 10, 2015, 01:02:04 AM
"A very good little relay. Suitable for use in making simple 120VAC logic circuits for line powered equipment. The 12A contact rating makes this relay suitable for motor control applications". $2.59

This is a DPDT relay. This is my favorite switch. This current reversing switch will allow the operator to control the frequency. Merely connecting the four parallel outer pins cross ways will energize the coil each way with an A.C. pulse. It doesn't matter what side of the coil the wires are attached to.
Title: Re: A.C. Tesla bifilar ferrite rotor attraction motor.
Post by: synchro1 on October 10, 2015, 02:06:02 PM
Relay bifilar overunity?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyEFaU-O8ZY

Marc's claiming overunity just from pulsing the bifilar alone, but he makes no use of the magnetic field in his bifilar coil. He could easily power a bearingless neo spinner with the oscillating magnetic field from the amplified power of the Tesla bifilar coil! 

"TeaKaluaholic" can add this to his trophy case of malapropisms.
Title: Re: A.C. Tesla bifilar ferrite rotor attraction motor.
Post by: synchro1 on October 10, 2015, 07:34:05 PM
It's possible to see the tiny electro magnet coils through the plastic case in the picture of the A.C. relay above that move the switch contact. Introducing an oscillatory current into these coils will cause this relay to flutter. The plastic case snaps off exposing the two coil electrodes. This provides easy access to connect a 555 IC to the electrodes to adjust the frequency and allow speed control of the rotor. This is a much more versatile setup then Marc's 12 volt chattering relay.
Title: Re: A.C. Tesla bifilar ferrite rotor attraction motor.
Post by: synchro1 on October 11, 2015, 12:52:22 AM
The A.C. motor controller's complete; Next, we need to deliver an A.C. signal to the bifilar coil. A quick and dirty solution involves the audio frequency generator anyone can download off the internet. An audio amplifier needs to be connected to the PC program to regulate the amperage. That leaves the bifilar coil, rotor and bearing. The only remaining problem is to determine the self resonating frequency of the bifilar. It's easy to fish for, you can actually hear it start to audibly ring when you hit it. That frequency in Hertz stays fixed. The A.C. relay can only handle 12 amps at 120 volts, the maximum power. That's around 2 horsepower.

Now the motor has two controls: One for speed on the IC controller, and the other for torque on the amplifier. This motor design would be powerful and sophisticated enough to run an airplane, except the extension cord might get in the way. 

Let's measure the advantages: One , the coil measures zero impedance. Two, the rotor is completely free of Lenz drag which should yield a COP of very nearly 1; Hold on; There's an emerald green spark glowing in the relay, and a 120 volt bulb burning for free on fly back from the parting of the mechanical contacts. That equals OU!