Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Solid States Devices => solid state devices => Topic started by: d3x0r on August 03, 2015, 08:13:13 PM

Title: What is the difference between high and low voltage current?
Post by: d3x0r on August 03, 2015, 08:13:13 PM
A larger current results in a larger magnetic field through an inductor?
but how does a higher voltage change the character?
Voltage induced on a secondary is relative to the voltage in the primary... so there must be some difference?

Title: Re: What is the difference between high and low voltage current?
Post by: TinselKoala on August 03, 2015, 08:26:49 PM
A larger current results in a larger magnetic field through an inductor?

That much is correct, up to a point.
Quote
but how does a higher voltage change the character?
Voltage induced on a secondary is relative to the voltage in the primary... so there must be some difference?
Not quite.
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/farlaw.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday%27s_law_of_induction
http://web.mit.edu/viz/EM/visualizations/coursenotes/modules/guide10.pdf
Title: Re: What is the difference between high and low voltage current?
Post by: d3x0r on August 03, 2015, 10:01:41 PM



from the pdf "Faraday’s experiment demonstrates that an electric current is induced in the loop by changing the magnetic field. The coil behaves as if it were connected to an emf source. Experimentally it is found that the induced emf depends on the rate of change of magnetic flux through the coil."


But a variac doesn't change the frequency... just changes the current effectively; (connect a  12V downstep transformer to a variac) given that the coil in the transformer has a certain resistance the primary of the transformer will get a lesser current... but I guess less current at the same rate of change is a lower rate of change of flux....


hmm right rate of change... got it.

Title: Re: What is the difference between high and low voltage current?
Post by: minnie on August 04, 2015, 01:01:01 AM



   It's an intriguing subject and I'm trying to "get a grasp".
What I want to find out is what goes on at the atomic level.
Is it all about electrons and photons (virtual)?
Can anyone point me in the direction of a basic tutorial?
       Thanks, John.